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Graceland

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NEWS
June 18, 1987 | By Pamela Bloom, Special to The Inquirer
Paul Simon has found diamonds in South Africa. At least 10, to be exact. Ten singing Zulu men who sound sometimes like Gregorian monks, sometimes like the Temptations, and sometimes like nothing else in the world. The a cappella group is Ladysmith Black Mambazo, an unforgettable presence on Simon's Grammy-winning Graceland album and a major feature of the tour that stopped at the Spectrum last night and has another show scheduled there tonight. They are just becoming known in America, but they have been giant stars in South Africa for years, working and polishing to absolute brilliance a style that came to their leader in a dream.
NEWS
June 26, 2002
L&I SAYS Elvis can't stand outside of Mr. Barstool because the law prohibits retailers from putting their wares out on the sidewalk. We've going to skip right over the question of why a place called "Mr. Barstool" is selling a life-sized statue of Elvis and go on to ask this: If Philadelphia is no longer interested in tourists, shouldn't L&I now demand that all the city's attractions be kept under wraps? Move Swann Fountain indoors! Shroud Independence Hall! Move the Liberty Bell to a dark cellar!
NEWS
July 17, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
Older pop stars often serve up predictably balanced career overviews in concert - that's a safe way to keep everybody happy, after all. But it also keeps a musician from sharing his own perspective on what parts of his past he values most. Paul Simon's Saturday night show at the Borgata was indeed career-spanning, ranging from his earliest '60s hits to material from his newest album, Surprise. But the set left little doubt what music Simon considers the center of that body of work: his 1986 fling with South African music, Graceland.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
*  GRACELAND . 10 p.m. today, USA *  IN THE FLESH . 10 p.m. today, Friday and Saturday, BBC America   USA'S STILL the "blue skies" network, but sea and sun come at a price in its latest drama, "Graceland," which premieres tonight immediately after the final-season opener of "Burn Notice. " Loosely based on actual events involving a government-seized beachfront property used to house federal agents, "Graceland" stars Aaron Tveit ("Les Miserables") as Mike Warren, a rookie FBI agent who finds himself thrown into the deep end when he's assigned to live and work with undercover veteran Paul Briggs (Daniel Sunjata, "Rescue Me")
NEWS
August 16, 2002 | By Dick Polman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Life isn't easy for Elvis acolytes. They've got a hunka burnin' love for the dead baron of Graceland, and they can't fathom why so many heathens treat the guy as a punch line, a bloated relic of '70s kitsch. You might think they have no reason to complain, given that the anniversary of Elvis Presley's death - 25 years ago today - lured Katie Couric to his sloping lawn this week. That Elvis is cited by Fortune magazine as the world's richest dead celebrity ($37 million this year)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The composers of Elvis Presley's first gold record, "Heartbreak Hotel," attended a cake-cutting ceremony yesterday on the 51st anniversary of the birthday of the late rock-and-roll idol. Mae Axton and Tommy Durden also were to attend a banquet last night at Graceland, the Presley mansion that has been turned into a shrine to the superstar, who died in 1977. Graceland officials decided to commemorate Presley's birthday with a "30 Years of Gold" theme because he recorded his first gold, or million-selling, song, "Heartbreak Hotel," in January 1956.
NEWS
August 16, 2002 | By Steven Conn
The most extraordinary thing about Graceland, Elvis Presley's home and the place where he left us 25 years ago (due to a "dependence on medication" according to the Acoustiguide, an audio tour) is that it is so breathtakingly ordinary. It is routinely referred to as a "mansion" but in truth it is no such thing. No Versailles or Buckingham for the American King. Instead a large, but unpretentious house on a small hill, done appropriately enough in a "nouveau-plantation" style. Inside, Graceland might as well be anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Staff Writer
A bunch of daisies rests on Elvis Presley's grave. So does a wreath of carnations. And a red silk scarf. And a card shaped like a Gibson guitar. Elvis is buried at Graceland, and it is to the 14-acre estate that fans laden with flowers, gifts and memories are flocking this week on the tenth anniversary of his death. "It surprises me that so many people come back out here so many years after his death," said George Eaker, 43, of Thebes, Ill. "I'm surprised that I'm here. " "We'd move here if we could," said Mary Barker, 52, here from Oklahoma City with her family and friends.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By ADRIAN SAINZ & MATT SEDENSKY, Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - The Mississippi River rose yesterday to levels not seen in Memphis since the 1930s, swamping homes in low-lying neighborhoods and driving hundreds of people from their homes. But officials were confident that the levees would protect the city's world-famous musical landmarks, including Graceland and Beale Street, and that no new areas would see any serious flooding. As residents in the Home of the Blues waited last night for the river to crest at a projected mark just inches short of the record set in 1937, officials downstream in Louisiana began evacuating prisoners from the state's toughest penitentiary and opened floodgates to relieve pressure on levees outside of New Orleans.
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NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police-procedural maestro Steven Bochco's latest offering, Murder in the First , which premieres 10 p.m. Monday on TNT, does away with some of the usual conventions. Like Bochco's brilliant 1990s experiment, Murder One , it avoids the murder-a-week format, opting instead to cover a single homicide investigation through the course of its 10-episode first season. Starring Taye Diggs and Kathleen Robertson as San Francisco homicide detectives Hildy Mulligan and Terry English, the story also spends an unusual amount of time exploring the cops' personal lives.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
*  GRACELAND . 10 p.m. today, USA *  IN THE FLESH . 10 p.m. today, Friday and Saturday, BBC America   USA'S STILL the "blue skies" network, but sea and sun come at a price in its latest drama, "Graceland," which premieres tonight immediately after the final-season opener of "Burn Notice. " Loosely based on actual events involving a government-seized beachfront property used to house federal agents, "Graceland" stars Aaron Tveit ("Les Miserables") as Mike Warren, a rookie FBI agent who finds himself thrown into the deep end when he's assigned to live and work with undercover veteran Paul Briggs (Daniel Sunjata, "Rescue Me")
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's something inherently fascinating about the double life undercover cops lead. To serve justice, they must lie and deceive. To further the good, they must manipulate and betray people who have come to count on them as friends, allies, even lovers. USA Network makes a strong foray into that shadow world with Graceland , a slick, cinematic, and addictive thriller about undercover feds fighting crime in Southern California. It premieres Thursday with a 12-episode first season.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By ADRIAN SAINZ & MATT SEDENSKY, Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - The Mississippi River rose yesterday to levels not seen in Memphis since the 1930s, swamping homes in low-lying neighborhoods and driving hundreds of people from their homes. But officials were confident that the levees would protect the city's world-famous musical landmarks, including Graceland and Beale Street, and that no new areas would see any serious flooding. As residents in the Home of the Blues waited last night for the river to crest at a projected mark just inches short of the record set in 1937, officials downstream in Louisiana began evacuating prisoners from the state's toughest penitentiary and opened floodgates to relieve pressure on levees outside of New Orleans.
SPORTS
June 16, 2010 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
THE PHOTO THAT accompanies this story was snapped 8 years ago on an unbearably hot day in Memphis, Tenn. With a few hours on our hands before the Mike Tyson-Lennox Lewis bout that evening at the Pyramid, I persuaded Dad to drive out with me to Graceland, the extravagant estate where Elvis Presley wallowed in barbiturates and peanut butter-and-banana sandwiches. Given Dad was doing a book on Tyson, and that it would deal to some degree with the excesses of fame, it seemed like a good place to pick up a few odds and ends that could possibly work their way into his narrative.
NEWS
April 5, 2010 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
At a little past 11 Friday night, just as the sold-out crowd left the Vampire Weekend show at the Electric Factory, a bus bearing the logo "Bourgeois" inched down Seventh Street. An unrelated coincidence, no doubt, but an amusing one, as Vampire Weekend's Ivy League roots and its co-opting of South African guitar styles has balkanized critics: They either dismiss the band as privileged cultural imperialists or praise it for its knowing wit and inventive blend of cross-cultural styles.
NEWS
June 17, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Palin is hoping for man's evolution In the latest in Important Political News, Sarah Palin accepted an apology yesterday from David Letterman over his insensitive (flat-out sick) sexual joke about Palin's daughter. The Alaska governor, who had demanded that D.L., who is 62-going-on-12, ought to apologize to All Womankind, was grand enough to speak on behalf of that vast constituency. She said she accepted the mea culpa "on behalf of all young women, like my daughters, who hope men who 'joke' about public displays of sexual exploitation of girls will soon evolve.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WAS yesterday a slow day in the world of gossip? Oui. The big news was that Gallimard Jeunesse, the French publishers of the Harry Potter books, said it is not seeking damages from a 16-year-old boy who allegedly made an online posting of an unauthorized translation of the final book in the series. Unauthorized translation? Sacre bleu! He's lucky his reworking of the "Deathly Hallows" didn't lead him to the deathly gallows. The wicked, wicked teen spent a night in jail last week in Aix-en-Provence and was questioned by prosecutors before being released.
NEWS
July 17, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
Older pop stars often serve up predictably balanced career overviews in concert - that's a safe way to keep everybody happy, after all. But it also keeps a musician from sharing his own perspective on what parts of his past he values most. Paul Simon's Saturday night show at the Borgata was indeed career-spanning, ranging from his earliest '60s hits to material from his newest album, Surprise. But the set left little doubt what music Simon considers the center of that body of work: his 1986 fling with South African music, Graceland.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bubba Ho-Tep has one of the all-time great premises: Elvis is alive and living in a sleepy nursing home down in Texas. Sometime in the '70s he switched places with a convincing Elvis impersonator, trading in Graceland for a trailer park. No one believes his story, of course, so now he lies around with a bum hip, grousing about managed care and musing about Priscilla and his lost virility. Bruce Campbell, the Clint Eastwood of cheeseball movies such as Army of Darkness and Maniac Cop, is marvelous as an elderly Elvis, still proudly maned and sporting platinum sunglasses.
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