CollectionsGrads
IN THE NEWS

Grads

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 2, 1996 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
For five years, crack cocaine had Tony Smith in a choke hold. He once spent more than $800 a week on crack and bounced from homeless shelter to homeless shelter. Last year, after the habit cost Smith his fiancee and his job at an Abington tool manufacturer, he decided he'd had enough. "I didn't want to go back to living in and out of shelters," Smith said. "I knew I needed some help in getting my life together. " Help came from One Day At A Time, a transitional housing and substance-abuse program, and the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition's Job Placement for the Homeless Program.
SPORTS
April 19, 1999 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Valley Forge Military Academy graduates Larry Smith and Gary Stills were selected in the NFL draft Saturday, increasing the number of former Trojans in the NFL to seven. Jacksonville picked Smith, who played at Valley Forge in 1993 and 1994, in the second round with the 56th pick. The 6-foot-5 288-pounder played defensive tackle at Florida State. The Georgia native led Valley Forge in sacks in his two seasons there. Kansas City chose Stills in the third round with the 75th pick.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the 39 years that Edgewood Senior Regional High School has been educating children, more than 10,000 students have passed through its halls. Whether members of the Class of '67 or '87, those students are bound together by memories of Eagles touchdowns and Cooper's Folly Road - but not by an alumni association. Until now. A small group of dedicated parents, alumni and administrators have banded together to create an Edgewood Alumni Association. The group met for this first time this month to discuss raising money and compiling a database of all alumni.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Contributing was the Fort Worth Star-Telegram
It does pay to be a college graduate. A college graduate's earnings should be at least 62 percent higher than those of someone with only a high school education. The news is even better for college grads earning advanced degrees. The average annual salary for someone with a bachelor's degree is around $48,300, but people with master's degrees earn $54,300 annually. Those whose names begin with "Dr. " have mean annual salaries of $67,500. Lawyers and physicians do even better, of course, earning more than $90,000 on average.
NEWS
October 23, 2006 | By Barry Petchesky
This summer, shortly after graduating from Temple, I was cleaning out my room in preparation for my move from Philadelphia. Included among the stacks of newspapers was a recent issue of Penn's paper, the Daily Pennsylvanian, that had a cover story about the city falling even further in the percentage of residents with college degrees. For decades, despite city officials' best efforts, many students have been leaving Philadelphia after graduation. This deprives the city of the taxable and disposable incomes of young professionals, as well as the social cachet of being a desirable destination.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | BY EDWARD J. HUDAK
When the first announcement of my 25th high school reunion arrived in the mail, I put it aside for a while and then threw it away. None of that nostalgia stuff for me. Then, a few months later, the second announcement arrived. The reunion organizers, it said, decided to make it a "grand reunion" with many classes from the 50-year history of Philadelphia's Widener School. What began as a reunion of just a few classes turned into a sort of mini- convention of people with disabilities.
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Noel Weyrich
During his inaugural speech in January, Mayor Nutter made a grand promise to double the city's number of college graduates over the next five to 10 years, pointing out that with just 18 percent of the adult population holding bachelor's degrees, Philadelphia ranks a lowly 92d among the nation's 100 largest cities. To achieve this goal, Nutter claimed, "we need to commit our resources - both public and private - to helping those who started college but did not finish, some 73,000 Philadelphians.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
Two 1988 graduates of Methacton High School died Friday night from injuries they received in an auto accident in Valley Forge National Park earlier that evening. Killed were Sara Pontaski, 19, of the 800 block of Sunnyside Avenue in Audubon, and Michele Russo, 18, of Stoughton's Road in Collegeville. Russo, a freshman at Kutztown University majoring in art, was home for the weekend, her family said. Pontaski was a nursing assistant at Plymouth House in Plymouth Meeting. The two were riding in a 1988 Toyota pickup truck that went out of control while headed south on Old Route 363 at the Steel Bridge, according to Upper Merion police.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
For some city high school grads, a few dollars have meant a chance at a future. And yesterday, 26 of them were honored for making the most of that chance. The 26 students graduated from college this spring - partly because of the help they received from the "last dollar scholarships" they received through the Philadelphia Scholars program, which is funded by an endowment of nearly $6 million. Ranging between $200 and $3,000, last dollar scholarships have been awarded to more than 500 graduates from nine city high schools since 1990.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | By Dan Rottenberg, Inquirer Contributing Writer
Alexander Woolcott. Marian Anderson. Mark Blitzstein. Wilt Chamberlain. Stan Berenstain. Pearl Bailey. David Brenner. Frank Piasecki, the helicopter inventor. Guy Bluford, the astronaut. There, I have your attention - which demonstrates my point. The accomplished and famous Americans mentioned above share something in common with nearly 200,000 local schoolchildren: All of them went through the Philadelphia public school system. Yes, this is the very same school system that many Philadelphians have written off as a lost cause - partly, I suspect, because every time journalists like me discuss test scores and busing plans and Constance Clayton and Marvin Schuman, most people fall asleep.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA & DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN MARCH, James Harris left a comment on Jasmine Wright's Facebook page, words forever branded on her public, electronic memorial. "All in," he posted, with a picture of a dozen roses that said: "For you. " Under other circumstances, it would have been an innocuous gesture. But with yesterday's news, it twists into something ominous and morbid. Harris, a/k/a James Camp, has been charged with allegedly raping and murdering Wright, 27, on July 15 inside her apartment in the West Philly building where he had been the maintenance man, police said.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IT WAS ALMOST by accident that Tyshawn Toney reconnected with Jasmine Wright, an old friend from Penn State University. A few weeks ago, a photo of her at Drexel University popped up on his Facebook. Toney, who works at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, had no idea that Wright was in Philly completing her master's in public health. Toney, 31, laughed last night as he recalled their first meeting in a late-night visit to a Sheetz convenience store in State College. "She was always the quiet one," Toney said as dusk fell at Drexel Park, on Baring Street near 32nd in Powelton, where about 10 of Wright's friends gathered to honor her memory.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police said Saturday that a man was being questioned by investigators as a person of interest in connection with the death of a recent Drexel University graduate. Jasmine Wright, 27, was strangled inside her West Philadelphia apartment last week, police said. After she was not heard from, Wright's family asked police to check the apartment. Police found no signs of forced entry when they entered the unit Thursday and discovered her body. Evidence has led investigators to believe that Wright may have known her assailant.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
SOME PEOPLE stumble aimlessly through life, hoping to find purpose before their hourglass runs out of sand. Jasmine Wright wasn't one of them. "She had a promising future, she was definitely going to make a difference," said Wright's former roommate at Penn State University, who spoke with the Daily News last night on condition of anonymity. "It's beyond sad that her future got cut down so early. " At 27, Wright already had traveled the world in relentless pursuit of something simple, pure, noble - helping the less fortunate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The Mahoning Drive-In doesn't require guests to arrive behind the wheel of a vintage DeLorean, but it would certainly be in keeping with the spirit of the place. Entering the drive-in, about 90 minutes from Philly in Lehighton, Pa., can feel a bit like traveling back in time - if not quite to 1947, when the theater was built, then at least to the 1980s, when much of its current programming was produced. With a longtime projectionist and two former Temple University film students taking over its management this season, the Mahoning Drive-In has been reinvented as an open-air nostalgia palace.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The body of a 27-year-old woman who appeared to have been beaten and strangled was found Thursday afternoon in her West Philadelphia apartment, police said. Jasmine Wright was in her third-floor unit in the 200 block of South 50th Street. Her father could not reach her by phone and asked an apartment attendant to check on her, said Homicide Capt. James Clark. Wright, who lived alone, was pronounced dead at the scene at 2:35 p.m. She was a 2015 graduate of Drexel University's School of Public Health, a Drexel spokeswoman said Thursday night.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"LIKE A PUNCH in the gut. " That's how Keith Hooks said he felt upon hearing that Jasmine Wright, 27, his kind and quiet neighbor, had been found brutally murdered in her apartment. "It's just sick," Hooks, 53, said last night, mere feet from the slain Drexel University grad's front door, directly beside his own. "She was professional and sweet," Hooks said. "She just went about her business and didn't bother anybody. "And she certainly didn't deserve this. " Wright's body was found about 2:30 p.m. inside her third-floor apartment on 50th Street near Locust in West Philly, Homicide Capt.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mastery Charter School Shoemaker Campus called forward 86 students at its Thursday commencement ceremony at Temple University as Khalilah Harris, the keynote speaker, urged the seniors to make names for themselves. The Class of 2015 is "an unnamed generation blessed with the opportunity to claim their names and how they will be labeled," said Harris, deputy director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans. After honoring the victims of the Charleston, S.C., church shooting with a moment of silence, Harris spoke to a predominantly African American audience of graduates, friends, and family about the importance of avoiding labels and creating one's own success.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|