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BUSINESS
July 2, 1996 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
For five years, crack cocaine had Tony Smith in a choke hold. He once spent more than $800 a week on crack and bounced from homeless shelter to homeless shelter. Last year, after the habit cost Smith his fiancee and his job at an Abington tool manufacturer, he decided he'd had enough. "I didn't want to go back to living in and out of shelters," Smith said. "I knew I needed some help in getting my life together. " Help came from One Day At A Time, a transitional housing and substance-abuse program, and the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition's Job Placement for the Homeless Program.
SPORTS
April 19, 1999 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Valley Forge Military Academy graduates Larry Smith and Gary Stills were selected in the NFL draft Saturday, increasing the number of former Trojans in the NFL to seven. Jacksonville picked Smith, who played at Valley Forge in 1993 and 1994, in the second round with the 56th pick. The 6-foot-5 288-pounder played defensive tackle at Florida State. The Georgia native led Valley Forge in sacks in his two seasons there. Kansas City chose Stills in the third round with the 75th pick.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the 39 years that Edgewood Senior Regional High School has been educating children, more than 10,000 students have passed through its halls. Whether members of the Class of '67 or '87, those students are bound together by memories of Eagles touchdowns and Cooper's Folly Road - but not by an alumni association. Until now. A small group of dedicated parents, alumni and administrators have banded together to create an Edgewood Alumni Association. The group met for this first time this month to discuss raising money and compiling a database of all alumni.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Contributing was the Fort Worth Star-Telegram
It does pay to be a college graduate. A college graduate's earnings should be at least 62 percent higher than those of someone with only a high school education. The news is even better for college grads earning advanced degrees. The average annual salary for someone with a bachelor's degree is around $48,300, but people with master's degrees earn $54,300 annually. Those whose names begin with "Dr. " have mean annual salaries of $67,500. Lawyers and physicians do even better, of course, earning more than $90,000 on average.
NEWS
October 23, 2006 | By Barry Petchesky
This summer, shortly after graduating from Temple, I was cleaning out my room in preparation for my move from Philadelphia. Included among the stacks of newspapers was a recent issue of Penn's paper, the Daily Pennsylvanian, that had a cover story about the city falling even further in the percentage of residents with college degrees. For decades, despite city officials' best efforts, many students have been leaving Philadelphia after graduation. This deprives the city of the taxable and disposable incomes of young professionals, as well as the social cachet of being a desirable destination.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | BY EDWARD J. HUDAK
When the first announcement of my 25th high school reunion arrived in the mail, I put it aside for a while and then threw it away. None of that nostalgia stuff for me. Then, a few months later, the second announcement arrived. The reunion organizers, it said, decided to make it a "grand reunion" with many classes from the 50-year history of Philadelphia's Widener School. What began as a reunion of just a few classes turned into a sort of mini- convention of people with disabilities.
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Noel Weyrich
During his inaugural speech in January, Mayor Nutter made a grand promise to double the city's number of college graduates over the next five to 10 years, pointing out that with just 18 percent of the adult population holding bachelor's degrees, Philadelphia ranks a lowly 92d among the nation's 100 largest cities. To achieve this goal, Nutter claimed, "we need to commit our resources - both public and private - to helping those who started college but did not finish, some 73,000 Philadelphians.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
Two 1988 graduates of Methacton High School died Friday night from injuries they received in an auto accident in Valley Forge National Park earlier that evening. Killed were Sara Pontaski, 19, of the 800 block of Sunnyside Avenue in Audubon, and Michele Russo, 18, of Stoughton's Road in Collegeville. Russo, a freshman at Kutztown University majoring in art, was home for the weekend, her family said. Pontaski was a nursing assistant at Plymouth House in Plymouth Meeting. The two were riding in a 1988 Toyota pickup truck that went out of control while headed south on Old Route 363 at the Steel Bridge, according to Upper Merion police.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
For some city high school grads, a few dollars have meant a chance at a future. And yesterday, 26 of them were honored for making the most of that chance. The 26 students graduated from college this spring - partly because of the help they received from the "last dollar scholarships" they received through the Philadelphia Scholars program, which is funded by an endowment of nearly $6 million. Ranging between $200 and $3,000, last dollar scholarships have been awarded to more than 500 graduates from nine city high schools since 1990.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | By Dan Rottenberg, Inquirer Contributing Writer
Alexander Woolcott. Marian Anderson. Mark Blitzstein. Wilt Chamberlain. Stan Berenstain. Pearl Bailey. David Brenner. Frank Piasecki, the helicopter inventor. Guy Bluford, the astronaut. There, I have your attention - which demonstrates my point. The accomplished and famous Americans mentioned above share something in common with nearly 200,000 local schoolchildren: All of them went through the Philadelphia public school system. Yes, this is the very same school system that many Philadelphians have written off as a lost cause - partly, I suspect, because every time journalists like me discuss test scores and busing plans and Constance Clayton and Marvin Schuman, most people fall asleep.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
While some teens are soaking up their last weeks of summer at camp or on vacation, 14-year-old Samantha DeMartino spent Monday visiting corporate America. DeMartino, of Robbinsville, N.J., was among 50 high school and college-age young women participating in "Discovery Days," the latest project for University of Pennsylvania alumna Katlyn Grasso to connect girls with successful female role models. The idea, Grasso said, is to "bring the online world offline. " "Girls needed role models and they also needed experiential learning opportunities.
SPORTS
August 3, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
On a muggy Midwest night in June, Kelsi Worrell climbed out of an Omaha pool as an Olympian. The Century Link Center scoreboard, which after the 100-meter butterfly final flashed a "1" next to her name, confirmed that. Walking off the deck, one hand covering a mouth still open wide in joy and surprise, she spotted her family. That's when she cried, the same way Olympic champions often do when the National Anthem plays, and their country's flag rises slowly above their heads. If Worrell, a Westhampton, N.J., native, finds herself atop a medals podium next week at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, it won't be any more improbable than the journey that took her there.
SPORTS
July 22, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Lori King expected the pain. You don't swim for more than 21 hours in the open waters around Bermuda - all the way around, Elbow Beach to Elbow Beach - without aching shoulders, head winds exacting their toll, seemingly whatever direction she swam. A former La Salle University swimmer, Class of 1997, King felt she nailed her nutrition in the run-up to last month's swim. She was ready for the cold water. Still, 16 hours in, aiming for land points that seemed never to arrive - "Objects always appear closer than they are" - she eventually knew her right rotator cuff had slightly torn.
SPORTS
July 8, 2016
Former La Salle High School quarterback Kyle Shurmur is to be the clear-cut No. 1 quarterback at Vanderbilt this season. In a story by the Tennessean , coach Derek Mason made it clear: "I want to just say this: We have a clear-cut one and a clear-cut two," Mason said. "Kyle Shurmur is my clear-cut starter. " According to the Tennessean, "Shurmur's role as the No. 1 quarterback has been assumed since he started five of the last six games as a true freshman last season. And his place seemed almost cemented when Mason said, 'I believe Vanderbilt has found a quarterback in Kyle Shurmur,' following a season-finale loss to Tennessee, when the freshman passed for a career-high 209 yards and three TD passes - the most by any Vanderbilt quarterback in more than a year.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
FOR THE PAST three years, Emma Morando-Young and Anthony Young's Philadelphia home has been doubling as a college dorm. The dining room table is strewn with books - the result of too many 3 a.m. homework sessions - rather than forks and knives. On Monday, some 13 years into their marriage, after raising kids and pursuing careers, the Youngs will walk down another aisle - to get college diplomas at the same time. The couple will graduate from Peirce College, a Center City school focused on adult learners.
SPORTS
June 12, 2016
Former La Salle High multisport star Jimmy Herron, now a freshman baseball player at Duke, earned Louisville Slugger freshman all-America honors this week. Herron, who also starred as a receiver on the Explorers football team, was named second-team all-ACC. He finished the regular season tied for the league lead with 22 doubles and was second with 24 steals. Herron started all but one of the Blue Devils' 57 games, playing center and left field. He finished second on the team with a .324 batting average and led the team in hits (67)
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - Speaking at the Rutgers University commencement Sunday, President Obama condemned what he said was a disturbing anti-intellectual strain in contemporary politics and delivered a thinly disguised takedown of presumed Republican nominee Donald Trump. "In politics and in life, ignorance is not a virtue," Obama told more than 50,000 people in Highpoint Solutions Stadium, home to the school's football program. "It's not cool to not know what you're talking about.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Rutgers University's New Brunswick commencement ceremony next month - with President Obama as speaker - will be ticketed for crowd control, which is riling some college seniors who say they now have to decide whom to invite. Each of the 12,000 graduating Rutgers-New Brunswick students is being offered three guest tickets for the May 15 event at High Point Solutions Stadium in Piscataway. Rutgers-Camden and Rutgers-Newark students also are being invited to attend the ceremony as guests, which has made some New Brunswick students angry.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
College graduation rates are generally rising across the country. That's the good news. Less positive: Gaps remain between the graduation rates of black students and white students, and in some cases those gaps have increased, according to a new report. Some local schools have done well, with Rutgers University's New Brunswick and Newark campuses both shrinking the black/white gap in graduation rates. But, the report found, Rowan University and Kean University saw black graduation rates decrease as white graduation rates rose.
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