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Graduate Programs

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NEWS
June 7, 1995 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
French bids adieu. Computer science crashes. Political science gets vetoed. To channel more of Temple University's strained resources into undergraduate education, graduate programs in those and at least six other disciplines should be dismantled, according to recommendations by provost James England. Along with the demise of doctoral or master's programs in those fields, England urged that advanced degree programs in a dozen more areas be "significantly restructured," making them smaller or more focused.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2016
The Mann Center for the Performing Arts , Philadelphia, has appointed Andrew Hamilton and Gordon Wilder to its board. Hamilton is a partner at Morgan Lewis & Bockius L.L.P. and Wilder is vice president of capital markets and divisional manager for the Central and Mid-Atlantic regions for Wells Fargo & Co. Gwynedd Mercy Academy High School, Gwynedd Valley, a college preparatory high school with 400 young women attending, has elected Kathleen Haley Hunsicker, vice chair of the board of supervisors of Lower Gwynedd Township, and Sister Margaret Ann Dougherty, coordinator, graduate programs in education at Alvernia University, to its board.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bryn Mawr College will eliminate some graduate programs, reduce student financial aid and increase its undergraduate enrollment under a plan approved yesterday by the school's trustees. The measures, which are to be phased in over a five-year period beginning this fall, are aimed at staving off a potential cash shortage by the 1991-92 academic year, school officials said. The action follows a consultant's study that found the college was spending a portion of its endowment earnings to cover operating costs at a faster rate than is considered fiscally prudent.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Preston Bodison was a junior at St. Joseph's University in 1990, and contemplating his future. Like a lot of his classmates, he was considering graduate school but - to put it frankly - "I didn't think I had the smarts; I mean, I'm average," he said. Then, he was invited to attend a three-day seminar on graduate school opportunities for African American and Hispanic students, sponsored by State Sen. Chaka Fattah. At the end of the three days, Bodison was not only planning to pursue a master's degree at the University of Pennsylvania; he also was determined to earn a doctoral degree in psychology at Temple University.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Phila.) yesterday proposed a $14 million aid program aimed at increasing the number of blacks and Hispanics in graduate programs at public and private colleges in Pennsylvania. Fattah's proposal, which is to be introduced in the General Assembly on Monday, came on the eve of a three-day conference on minority enrollment in graduate education that was expected to draw more than 400 minority students from across the state to the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
NEWS
May 2, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Academic question of the day: What does it cost to change a college into a university? Answer: About $1 million. Neumann College believes the investment, largely to pay for new signs, stationery and anything else with the university's name on it, will pay off in prestige. And that could help the school better navigate the troubled economy and an expected drop in high school graduates nationwide over the next decade. Neumann president Rosalie Mirenda announced the change yesterday morning at a news conference on the Aston campus in Delaware County following approval Thursday by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The first doctorate degrees from a South Jersey institution will be awarded today at Rowan University, just four years after the school changed its name from Rowan College. Four women will receive a doctorate in education, or an Ed.D., from the College of Education's Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership during Rowan's commencement ceremonies. The program, whose faculty members have included Assembly Speaker Jack Collins and former state Education Commissioner David Hespe, trains experienced educators to assume leadership roles in secondary and higher education.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Drexel art administrator will become the new president of Moore College of Art & Design, replacing longtime leader Happy Fernandez, officials announced Thursday. Cecelia Fitzgibbon, director of Drexel's graduate arts administration program for the last 16 years, will take the helm at the small private arts college in July. Fernandez announced in May that she would be leaving Moore, at 20th and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where she became president in 1999. Fitzgibbon, 57, of Wilmington, was selected from about 40 candidates for the job at Moore, which enrolls more than 460 undergraduate students and more than 50 in graduate programs.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Drexel art administrator will become the new president of Moore College of Art & Design, replacing long-time leader Happy Fernandez, officials announced Thursday morning. Cecelia Fitzgibbon, who has been director of Drexel's Graduate Arts Administration Program for the last 16 years, will take the helm at the small private arts college in July. Fernandez announced last May that she would be leaving Moore, at 20th and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where she became president in 1999.
NEWS
May 17, 2003 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Commission on Higher Education yesterday approved the relicensing of three Philadelphia universities to continue to operate programs in the state. Drexel University was given a new three-year license to maintain its undergraduate courses in construction management in Winslow Township. La Salle University was given a license extension to continue to offer graduate religion courses within the Diocese of Trenton. Thomas Jefferson University was approved for a three-year license to keep up its undergraduate nursing courses at Atlantic City Medical Center.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 2016
The Mann Center for the Performing Arts , Philadelphia, has appointed Andrew Hamilton and Gordon Wilder to its board. Hamilton is a partner at Morgan Lewis & Bockius L.L.P. and Wilder is vice president of capital markets and divisional manager for the Central and Mid-Atlantic regions for Wells Fargo & Co. Gwynedd Mercy Academy High School, Gwynedd Valley, a college preparatory high school with 400 young women attending, has elected Kathleen Haley Hunsicker, vice chair of the board of supervisors of Lower Gwynedd Township, and Sister Margaret Ann Dougherty, coordinator, graduate programs in education at Alvernia University, to its board.
NEWS
January 2, 2016 | By Jessica Parks, Staff Writer
Lucien Roland Roy, 91, a mathematics professor at Villanova University for 40 years, died Monday, Dec. 28, of natural causes at a nursing home in Needham, Mass. Mr. Roy was known for his enthusiasm and high standards in the classroom, although colleagues said he was not to every student's taste. "He had a French Canadian accent, and he'd get quite wrapped up in a given theorem or something. Students would be standing there, and he's ranting and raving about how important this thing is," said David Strows, director of graduate programs.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unveiled in 2009, Drexel's Sacramento, Calif., campus was supposed to be the first of five new locations in growing U.S. cities that would help the university expand its reach. And it was supposed to be the first step in a larger plan to open a 5,000-student undergraduate campus on a large swath of land in nearby Placer County. That's what the late Drexel president Constantine "Taki" Papadakis envisioned. But no other centers have opened, and on Thursday, Drexel said it was pulling out of California after a "comprehensive evaluation" by its board of trustees.
NEWS
March 3, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A 20-SOMETHING man was seated yesterday next to a teen girl at 30th Street Station, his arm around her small shoulders, working his charms to lure her to a party and so much more. But a film crew stationed a few feet away and a small number of adults standing nearby were a sign that all was not as creepy as it may have seemed. It was all in the service of "Keeping Our Children Safe: Online and IRL (In Real Life)," a volunteer, small-film production about human trafficking involving a couple of professional actors and five students from the Philadelphia High School for the Creative and Performing Arts.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Wendell Pritchett had big plans when he arrived at Rutgers-Camden in 2009 to become chancellor. In five years, he said then, he would boost enrollment to 7,500, usher in the campus' first Ph.D. programs, open a nursing school, and quadruple the number of students living on campus. That five-year mark is approaching quickly. Pritchett, who came to Rutgers-Camden from the University of Pennsylvania, where he taught law, announced in the fall he would step down at the end of June.
NEWS
September 22, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University president Ali Houshmand, in a formal inauguration Friday, shared his vision of continued growth and advancement for the school and its community. Houshmand, who has served as interim president and president since 2011, also talked about how far Rowan had come, including two medical schools; achieving research institution status; increasing endowment, scholarships, enrollment, and programs; and executing a $300 million private-public community development initiative with Glassboro, all without raising tuition this year.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archbishop Ryan High School in the Northeast and Holy Family University today unveiled a new partnership that includes a dual-credit program. Archbishop Ryan students who complete Holy Family courses offered on Ryan's campus on Academy Road will receive both high school and college credits for their work. "Today marks an historic moment in our school's 47-year history," Ryan's President Michael McCardle said at a signing ceremony carried live on the websites of both Ryan and Holy Family University.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Drexel art administrator will become the new president of Moore College of Art & Design, replacing longtime leader Happy Fernandez, officials announced Thursday. Cecelia Fitzgibbon, director of Drexel's graduate arts administration program for the last 16 years, will take the helm at the small private arts college in July. Fernandez announced in May that she would be leaving Moore, at 20th and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where she became president in 1999. Fitzgibbon, 57, of Wilmington, was selected from about 40 candidates for the job at Moore, which enrolls more than 460 undergraduate students and more than 50 in graduate programs.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Drexel art administrator will become the new president of Moore College of Art & Design, replacing long-time leader Happy Fernandez, officials announced Thursday morning. Cecelia Fitzgibbon, who has been director of Drexel's Graduate Arts Administration Program for the last 16 years, will take the helm at the small private arts college in July. Fernandez announced last May that she would be leaving Moore, at 20th and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where she became president in 1999.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - During his 2010 gubernatorial campaign, Tom Corbett made the funding of an Arlen Specter library in Philadelphia the punch line of a campaign ad about wasteful government spending. Think of that funding, Corbett said in the television ad, "next time you hear we have to raise taxes because there's nothing left to cut. " Now, the joke may be on him. This week, Gov. Corbett signed off on a $1.9 million state grant for the library that will house Specter's papers and memorabilia - along with an office for the former Pennsylvania senator.
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