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Graduate School

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NEWS
February 23, 1997 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yohann D'Oliveira never set out to be a triple graduate student. But after the bachelor's degree in finance from Beaver College came a master's from Temple. Now, D'Oliveira, 26, who grew up at 60th and Market Streets in West Philadelphia, is close to earning a law degree and a doctorate in economics. The intellectual odyssey, he said, was spurred in 1990 at an Education Summit sponsored by U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Phila.). The experience so influenced D'Oliveira that he has returned nearly every year since to help spread the gospel on graduate school.
NEWS
August 25, 2016
ISSUE | FRANK RIZZO Statue 'is deeply offensive' I moved to Philadelphia in 1971 to attend graduate school. Living my first eight years in a city where Frank Rizzo was mayor did not inspire civic pride. I watched his "law-and-order" regime treat with contempt the North Philadelphia community where I was attending school, provoke what would become the MOVE tragedy, destroy the nation's bicentennial celebration with his vicious response to possible protests, and instill fear among law-abiding African American and gay residents.
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Theodore Arapis
Pennsylvania needs to take a crash course in school funding fairness. That's one conclusion drawn from the 2016 National Report Card (NRC), which gave the Keystone State a D for its inequitable funding system. Although ranked among states that generally provide high fiscal support to their school districts, Pennsylvania is in the unenviable company of 13 other states deemed regressive in their school-funding levels. According to 2013 data, the most recent available, Pennsylvania school districts with 30 percent of their student body living at the poverty level received 7 percent less per-pupil state funding than school districts with no students living in poverty.
SPORTS
January 25, 2001 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sean Hansen had planned to go to graduate school at Texas, where younger brother Brendan, a freshman, is making waves in the breaststroke. But a call at the end of last summer changed all that for the former Haverford High and Lafayette standout. The call came from the Healthplex in Springfield asking Sean Hansen to coach the aquatics teams there. A short time later, a representative of the Haverford School called to say it was looking for a swim coach. Sean remembered the school's outdated pool and wasn't enthusiastic about taking the job. "Then he told me Haverford was getting a new pool," said Sean Hansen, who is now coaching at both the Healthplex and Haverford School.
NEWS
April 6, 2013
The Middle States Commission on Higher Education has approved a Lincoln University plan to open a campus in Coatesville. Classes will start in the fall at a new branch of the historically black college, at 351 Kersey St. Courses initially will be offered in the evening and on weekends. Other classes will be added as enrollment increases. For information on undergraduate admissions, contact 484-365-7207; for the graduate school, call 215-590-8233. - Kristin E. Holmes
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Bill Cosby offered to pay college tuition for two women who alleged he drugged and sexually assaulted them, according to court filings unsealed this week. The scholarships were not intended to buy his accusers' silence, Cosby maintained in a 2005 deposition. But both offers were made immediately after the women confronted him about the alleged sexual encounters. His admission regarding the tuition payments could further complicate one of the 77-year-old actor-comedian's most visible philanthropic legacies - the millions of dollars he and his wife, Camille, have given to universities and individuals seeking college degrees.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
Gratz College recently received an endowment gift of $1 million, the largest such gift in the Montgomery County institution's 120-year history, officials said Tuesday. The gift was bequeathed by Berenice Abrams, an alumna from the class of 1936, in memory of her parents, said Joy Goldstein, the college's president. The gift is restricted for the use of the Benjamin and Dorothy Abrams Scholarship Fund, which will aid teachers working in the field of Jewish education. Abrams, 96, died in 2014.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marie Cornelia-Shew, 77, of Center City, a retired English professor and former associate dean at the graduate school of Rutgers-Camden, died Saturday, Nov. 16, of a heart attack. Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mrs. Shew graduated from Nazareth University there and later received her doctorate from Fordham University in New York City. In the early 1970s, she began a career at Rutgers that spanned nearly four decades and touched the lives of thousands of students. She was known on campus as Dr. Cornelia.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Pennsylvania State Sen. H. Craig Lewis, 68, who represented Bucks County and parts of Philadelphia for 20 years, died Sunday, Jan. 13, while swimming on Anegada in the British Virgin Islands. Sen. Lewis, who served five terms, lived in Center City. According to British Virgin Islands police, Sen. Lewis was on vacation and on a day sail at Loblolly Bay when his wife, Dianne Semingson, noticed he was facedown and motionless in the water. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The story of Lincoln University's beginnings routinely highlights the benevolent white Presbyterian minister who founded the first degree-granting institution for African Americans. The Rev. John Miller Dickey started the historically black university in Chester County. James Ralston Amos and his brother, Thomas Henry Amos, were students, among the first to graduate. But in a retelling that shakes up a 160-year history, Cheryl ReneƩ Gooch, a dean at the school, elevates the Amos brothers' contribution.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Theodore Arapis
Pennsylvania needs to take a crash course in school funding fairness. That's one conclusion drawn from the 2016 National Report Card (NRC), which gave the Keystone State a D for its inequitable funding system. Although ranked among states that generally provide high fiscal support to their school districts, Pennsylvania is in the unenviable company of 13 other states deemed regressive in their school-funding levels. According to 2013 data, the most recent available, Pennsylvania school districts with 30 percent of their student body living at the poverty level received 7 percent less per-pupil state funding than school districts with no students living in poverty.
NEWS
August 25, 2016
ISSUE | FRANK RIZZO Statue 'is deeply offensive' I moved to Philadelphia in 1971 to attend graduate school. Living my first eight years in a city where Frank Rizzo was mayor did not inspire civic pride. I watched his "law-and-order" regime treat with contempt the North Philadelphia community where I was attending school, provoke what would become the MOVE tragedy, destroy the nation's bicentennial celebration with his vicious response to possible protests, and instill fear among law-abiding African American and gay residents.
NEWS
July 17, 2016
Her Again Becoming Meryl Streep By Michael Schulman; HarperCollins. 293 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by Carrie Rickey 'Superlatives stick to her like thumbtacks," Michael Schulman writes early in his chronicle of the making of America's most-acclaimed actress. It is a sign that he comes not to bury her, but to puncture her with praise. The book's title comes courtesy of Streep's 2012 Oscar acceptance speech for her role as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady . "When they called my name," she said, "I had this feeling, I could hear half of America going, 'Ohhh, no. Oh, come on. Why?
NEWS
June 24, 2016
ISSUE | SEXUAL ABUSE Greenleaf's conflict Thank you for your editorial exposing certain members of the Pennsylvania Senate for the sham Judiciary Committee hearing on a bill that would give abuse victims more time to file criminal and civil claims, a conflict of interest, and the consequent lack of integrity ("Poor excuse to ignore abuse," Monday). It seems that Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Montgomery) has a distinct conflict - his law firm represented a religious order in Delaware that was sued by abuse victims.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Kudos to Obama girls The first daughters are fast approaching adulthood. Malia Obama , who turns 18 on the Fourth of July, graduated from high school on Friday. Dad President Obama , mom Michelle and sister Sasha attended the ceremony at Sidwell Friends in Washington's northwest section. "I'm going to be sitting there with dark glasses, sobbing," the prez told Ellen DeGeneres earlier this year. The Obamas kept a low profile. "[Obama] was just a total dad. No fanfare.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
Gratz College recently received an endowment gift of $1 million, the largest such gift in the Montgomery County institution's 120-year history, officials said Tuesday. The gift was bequeathed by Berenice Abrams, an alumna from the class of 1936, in memory of her parents, said Joy Goldstein, the college's president. The gift is restricted for the use of the Benjamin and Dorothy Abrams Scholarship Fund, which will aid teachers working in the field of Jewish education. Abrams, 96, died in 2014.
NEWS
May 23, 2016
Elizabeth Eisenstadt Evans is a writer in Glenmoore My son and I almost never fight. Life with this balanced, curious, and fiercely independent child has, by and large, been serene, even joyful. But in this spring of his senior year in high school, Colin and I found ourselves caught up in college admissions mania, a process that engendered not only disillusionment but bickering, disappointment, and, ultimately, some cathartic, necessary, and very difficult conversations. The last time my son and I had found ourselves at odds was when I urged him to try the then-new public high school opening in our school district, the STEM Academy.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
THE PARENTS: Grace Savage, 30, and Tom Savage, 29, of Ambler THE KIDS: Thomas (Tripp) Savage III, 22 months; Mollie Grace Savage, born February 3, 2016 THE CONCERT TOM MISSED BECAUSE GRACE WAS IN LABOR WITH MOLLIE: The Owls, an indie rock band; he'd been a fan since age 13. It wasn't a date. It was just An Inconvenient Truth , playing at a nearby movie theater on a summer night. But by the end of the outing, Tom thought Grace was hilarious and Grace thought Tom was easygoing, and they'd talked so long it was nearly morning.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: As my spouse and I decide when to have children, I find myself, the female partner, ambivalent about "motherhood. " It feels like being a "mom" in our culture is so all-consuming and defining of who you get to be and how you get to live that I worry about the rest of me and us. It doesn't seem like my friends have this same anxiety at all. Do you have any words of wisdom? Can I just get over it? It might not shock you to learn that culture and gender are fields I studied in graduate school, and that, yes, my field is slightly-to-quite hostile toward pregnancy/childbearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
THE PARENTS: Haajar Aziz, 32, and Kamau Halim, 37, of Wynnefield THE KIDS: Laylah Aiyesha-Arlene and Malik Ashtar-Kamau, born Jan. 7, 2016 For Haajar and Kamau, parenthood - in fact, life itself - called for faith and planning. From the moment they met, introduced by older sisters who had been best friends for years, the couple shared a spiritual and a practical agenda. Kamau was finishing graduate work in Buffalo; Haajar had recently returned to Philadelphia after studying theology in Iran.
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