CollectionsGraduate School
IN THE NEWS

Graduate School

NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marie Cornelia-Shew, 77, of Center City, a retired English professor and former associate dean at the graduate school of Rutgers-Camden, died Saturday, Nov. 16, of a heart attack. Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mrs. Shew graduated from Nazareth University there and later received her doctorate from Fordham University in New York City. In the early 1970s, she began a career at Rutgers that spanned nearly four decades and touched the lives of thousands of students. She was known on campus as Dr. Cornelia.
NEWS
June 29, 2002 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Rowe knew that making the transition from a small college in Nashville to a graduate mathematics program at the University of Kentucky would be tough. That is why she took a detour this summer to Bryn Mawr College. At Belmont University, said Rowe, 22, "I was the only math major out of 400 students" in the graduating class. Now, she's worried about graduate school, where she wants to get the doctorate she'll need to become a college professor. She's hoping that the EDGE program will smooth her path.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The vice dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania resigned Thursday, one day after he was placed on administrative leave pending an investigation about his false claim to have a doctoral degree. Penn announced the resignation of Doug E. Lynch, who has been a top official in the education program since 2004. Lynch has claimed on his resume that he received the degree from Columbia University. A faculty website repeatedly referred to him as Dr. Lynch.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Curtis Institute of Music vice president and dean John R. Mangan has resigned, school officials said. Mangan, 47, who held the post for 31/2 years, declined to speak about his reasons for leaving the conservatory, referring a reporter to Curtis' press office. "John resigned on Jan. 4 indicating that, as Curtis prepares for the next strategic phase of its future, he made the decision to step down," said a spokeswoman. "He plans to explore other opportunities in his field. " At Curtis, the dean oversees musical and liberal-arts curriculum and the library, and works closely with president/CEO Roberto Díaz and others on student and faculty matters.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the campus of Cheyney University, a school that is no stranger to financial hardship, professor Adedoyin M. Adeyiga is a rainmaker. The African-born chemistry professor, whose father is a king in Nigeria, has secured more than $5 million in grants for programming to increase minority participation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). An additional $1.35 million is pending. Adeyiga, or "Dr. A. " as he is known on campus, works furiously to stop students from shunning a subject and career path that many consider scary and intimidating.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kamri Staples was determined to let nothing stop her drive to a career in medicine - not the chaos in Chester's struggling public schools, not lack of money, not even a bureaucratic screw-up that evidently robbed her of a chance to transfer to elite Episcopal Academy. Now, by winning a national honor that makes her a rarity in the troubled district, the 17-year-old can laugh at what she calls her one moment of high anxiety: when she got to watch a gall bladder removal during a Lankenau Science Symposium, right around lunchtime.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The gulf was not immediately apparent as Alex Klein spoke Wednesday. The 24-year-old tech entrepreneur was low-key as he chatted up juniors and seniors at Kensington Creative and Performing Arts High School - casual in a checkered shirt, Nikes with a pink swoosh, and holding a small cup of Dunkin' Donuts coffee. "Is that cool?" Klein asked before passing around a box containing the $150, build-it-yourself Kano computer he has invented and is turning into a global company with help from Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania placed the vice dean of its Graduate School of Education on administrative leave late Wednesday after The Inquirer began asking questions about his false claim to have a doctoral degree. Doug E. Lynch has claimed on his resumé that he received the degree from Columbia University. A faculty website repeatedly refers to him as "Dr. Lynch. " Earlier Wednesday, Penn officials said they became aware of the misrepresentation a couple of months ago, taking unspecified "appropriate sanctions" but deciding to leave Lynch in his leadership role.
NEWS
September 30, 2012
At 27, Martha Carey Thomas applied to be president of a newly formed women's college in Bryn Mawr. She didn't get the job, but was hired as dean and an English professor in 1884. After 10 years at Bryn Mawr College, she was elected its president in 1894. Thomas (she preferred to go by M. Carey or Carey) was born in 1857 in Baltimore. She grew up with a strong determination to attain a higher education, despite her father's wishes otherwise. She was educated at Cornell and Johns Hopkins Universities.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
Jacques Barzun, a Columbia University historian and administrator whose sheer breadth of scholarship - culminating in a survey of 500 years of Western civilization - brought him renown as one of the foremost intellectuals of the 20th century, died Oct. 25 in San Antonio, where he had lived in recent years. He was 104. His son-in-law Gavin Parfit confirmed his death, the Associated Press reported. Barzun was 92 when he published what is widely regarded as his masterwork, From Dawn to Decadence, 500 Years of Western Cultural Life: 1500 to the Present . Journalist David Gates spoke for a majority of critics when he wrote in Newsweek magazine that the book, which appeared in 2000, "will go down in history as one of the great one-man shows of Western letters.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|