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Graduate School

NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marie Cornelia-Shew, 77, of Center City, a retired English professor and former associate dean at the graduate school of Rutgers-Camden, died Saturday, Nov. 16, of a heart attack. Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mrs. Shew graduated from Nazareth University there and later received her doctorate from Fordham University in New York City. In the early 1970s, she began a career at Rutgers that spanned nearly four decades and touched the lives of thousands of students. She was known on campus as Dr. Cornelia.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
BOSCH. Today, Amazon Prime Video. TITUS WELLIVER is more binge-reader than binge-watcher. "I like to watch something and let it sort of gestate," said the star of Amazon Studios' new cop drama "Bosch," in a recent interview. "I kind of read voraciously. I've always got, like, three books going at the same time. " In "Bosch," based on Michael Connelly's best-selling books and premiering today on Amazon Prime, Welliver, who spent a chunk of his childhood in Philadelphia, plays Los Angeles police detective Harry Bosch.
NEWS
October 21, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
As Jason Osder tells it, in 1985 he was 11, a fifth-grader at the Miquon School in Conshohocken, when news broke that after a daylong standoff, the Philadelphia Police and Fire Departments had bombed the MOVE headquarters on Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia. Six adults, including John Africa, the activist/provocateur/founder of the back-to-nature group, and five children were incinerated in the resulting fire, which also destroyed 60 other homes. One of the two members who survived, Michael Moses Ward (known then as Birdie Africa)
NEWS
June 29, 2002 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Rowe knew that making the transition from a small college in Nashville to a graduate mathematics program at the University of Kentucky would be tough. That is why she took a detour this summer to Bryn Mawr College. At Belmont University, said Rowe, 22, "I was the only math major out of 400 students" in the graduating class. Now, she's worried about graduate school, where she wants to get the doctorate she'll need to become a college professor. She's hoping that the EDGE program will smooth her path.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The vice dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania resigned Thursday, one day after he was placed on administrative leave pending an investigation about his false claim to have a doctoral degree. Penn announced the resignation of Doug E. Lynch, who has been a top official in the education program since 2004. Lynch has claimed on his resume that he received the degree from Columbia University. A faculty website repeatedly referred to him as Dr. Lynch.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
Penn State President Rodney Erickson on Friday offered his best wishes to Henry C. "Hank" Foley, the university's vice president of research and the executive director of the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, who is leaving for a job in Missouri. The university announced in June that Foley, who has worked at Penn State for 13 years and is also dean of the graduate school, was departing to become the executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of Missouri System.
NEWS
March 24, 2015
M ICHELE McKEONE, 33, of Fishtown, is founder and CEO of Autism Expressed, an online learning system that teaches digital literacy to students with autism and other learning disabilities. Autism Expressed won a $20,000 prize from Educational Services of America and was Geekadelphia Startup of the Year for 2013, when it launched publicly. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: I have a background in digital media and went to the University of the Arts. I was an autistic-support teacher [at South Philadelphia High School]
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the campus of Cheyney University, a school that is no stranger to financial hardship, professor Adedoyin M. Adeyiga is a rainmaker. The African-born chemistry professor, whose father is a king in Nigeria, has secured more than $5 million in grants for programming to increase minority participation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). An additional $1.35 million is pending. Adeyiga, or "Dr. A. " as he is known on campus, works furiously to stop students from shunning a subject and career path that many consider scary and intimidating.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kamri Staples was determined to let nothing stop her drive to a career in medicine - not the chaos in Chester's struggling public schools, not lack of money, not even a bureaucratic screw-up that evidently robbed her of a chance to transfer to elite Episcopal Academy. Now, by winning a national honor that makes her a rarity in the troubled district, the 17-year-old can laugh at what she calls her one moment of high anxiety: when she got to watch a gall bladder removal during a Lankenau Science Symposium, right around lunchtime.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania placed the vice dean of its Graduate School of Education on administrative leave late Wednesday after The Inquirer began asking questions about his false claim to have a doctoral degree. Doug E. Lynch has claimed on his resumé that he received the degree from Columbia University. A faculty website repeatedly refers to him as "Dr. Lynch. " Earlier Wednesday, Penn officials said they became aware of the misrepresentation a couple of months ago, taking unspecified "appropriate sanctions" but deciding to leave Lynch in his leadership role.
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