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NEWS
July 14, 2013
Penn State President Rodney Erickson on Friday offered his best wishes to Henry C. "Hank" Foley, the university's vice president of research and the executive director of the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, who is leaving for a job in Missouri. The university announced in June that Foley, who has worked at Penn State for 13 years and is also dean of the graduate school, was departing to become the executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of Missouri System.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Gosfield Jr., 94, of Center City, a longtime cardiologist at Graduate Hospital, died Thursday, April 25, of complications following surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. So respected was Dr. Gosfield in the practice of cardiology and internal medicine that he was designated attending physician to Queen Elizabeth II when she visited the United States in 1976. He was a dapper dresser, almost never appearing in public without a signature bow tie. His sons, grandsons, and many medical residents all learned how to tie one by watching him. Dr. Gosfield matriculated in 1947 at the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, completing his training as a resident at Graduate Hospital in 1950.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2015
YOU'VE PROBABLY never heard of Rob Peace, but you might have. Peace was supposed to have done really big things with his life. The son of a single mother and a dad jailed for murder, he grew up in a low-income neighborhood in Newark, N.J., during the height of that city's crack-fueled drug wars. His mother worked in a hospital cafeteria and scrimped to get him into a private high school, where he excelled, earning straight A's. After graduating at the top of his class, Peace enrolled at Yale University on a full scholarship paid by a wealthy benefactor, who told him, "You can go to college wherever you want.
NEWS
October 21, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
As Jason Osder tells it, in 1985 he was 11, a fifth-grader at the Miquon School in Conshohocken, when news broke that after a daylong standoff, the Philadelphia Police and Fire Departments had bombed the MOVE headquarters on Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia. Six adults, including John Africa, the activist/provocateur/founder of the back-to-nature group, and five children were incinerated in the resulting fire, which also destroyed 60 other homes. One of the two members who survived, Michael Moses Ward (known then as Birdie Africa)
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Bill Cosby offered to pay college tuition for two women who alleged he drugged and sexually assaulted them, according to court filings unsealed this week. The scholarships were not intended to buy his accusers' silence, Cosby maintained in a 2005 deposition. But both offers were made immediately after the women confronted him about the alleged sexual encounters. His admission regarding the tuition payments could further complicate one of the 77-year-old actor-comedian's most visible philanthropic legacies - the millions of dollars he and his wife, Camille, have given to universities and individuals seeking college degrees.
NEWS
September 30, 2012
At 27, Martha Carey Thomas applied to be president of a newly formed women's college in Bryn Mawr. She didn't get the job, but was hired as dean and an English professor in 1884. After 10 years at Bryn Mawr College, she was elected its president in 1894. Thomas (she preferred to go by M. Carey or Carey) was born in 1857 in Baltimore. She grew up with a strong determination to attain a higher education, despite her father's wishes otherwise. She was educated at Cornell and Johns Hopkins Universities.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
Jacques Barzun, a Columbia University historian and administrator whose sheer breadth of scholarship - culminating in a survey of 500 years of Western civilization - brought him renown as one of the foremost intellectuals of the 20th century, died Oct. 25 in San Antonio, where he had lived in recent years. He was 104. His son-in-law Gavin Parfit confirmed his death, the Associated Press reported. Barzun was 92 when he published what is widely regarded as his masterwork, From Dawn to Decadence, 500 Years of Western Cultural Life: 1500 to the Present . Journalist David Gates spoke for a majority of critics when he wrote in Newsweek magazine that the book, which appeared in 2000, "will go down in history as one of the great one-man shows of Western letters.
NEWS
May 25, 2011
Chemist Corwin Hansch, 92, who pioneered the field of relating a molecule's chemical structure to its biological activity, an approach widely used in developing new drugs and other commercial chemicals, died in Claremont, Calif., on May 8. He had suffered from a prolonged bout with pneumonia. Dr. Hansch was known as the "father of computer-assisted molecule design" for his development of Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships, known colloquially as QSARs, a series of equations that allow chemists to modify drugs and other molecules in a predictable manner to achieve desired characteristics.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
NEWS
October 21, 2014
L INDSEY SCANNAPIECO, 28, of South Philadelphia, is managing partner and principal of Scout Ltd., which redevelops vacant properties. It recently won a competition to redevelop the vacant, eight-story Edward W. Bok Technical High School, on 9th Street near Mifflin. The daughter of prominent condo/apartment developer Tom Scannapieco, the Philly native moved back in June after five years in London. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Scout? A: I founded a company in London in 2011 and worked on projects to repurpose vacant, unused spaces.
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