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NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania placed the vice dean of its Graduate School of Education on administrative leave late Wednesday after The Inquirer began asking questions about his false claim to have a doctoral degree. Doug E. Lynch has claimed on his resumé that he received the degree from Columbia University. A faculty website repeatedly refers to him as "Dr. Lynch. " Earlier Wednesday, Penn officials said they became aware of the misrepresentation a couple of months ago, taking unspecified "appropriate sanctions" but deciding to leave Lynch in his leadership role.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The vice dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania resigned Thursday, one day after he was placed on administrative leave pending an investigation into his false claim to have a doctoral degree. Penn announced the resignation of Doug E. Lynch, who has been a top official in the education program since 2004, after The Inquirer raised questions about his academic background Wednesday. Lynch said on his resumé that he received the degree from Columbia University.
NEWS
October 21, 2014
L INDSEY SCANNAPIECO, 28, of South Philadelphia, is managing partner and principal of Scout Ltd., which redevelops vacant properties. It recently won a competition to redevelop the vacant, eight-story Edward W. Bok Technical High School, on 9th Street near Mifflin. The daughter of prominent condo/apartment developer Tom Scannapieco, the Philly native moved back in June after five years in London. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Scout? A: I founded a company in London in 2011 and worked on projects to repurpose vacant, unused spaces.
SPORTS
April 25, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Damion Lee, who had decided to transfer after playing three seasons at Drexel, will complete his final year of college basketball eligibility at Louisville. On Lee's Twitter account, there is a photo of Lee in a Louisville jersey with the words, "Louisville First Cards Forever. " The 6-foot-6 Lee, who was unavailable for comment, also mentioned on his Twitter page that he chose Louisville over Arizona, Gonzaga, Marquette, and Maryland. He will be eligible immediately and enroll at graduate school at Louisville after earning his undergraduate degree in general humanities social science at Drexel in June.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Pennsylvania State Sen. H. Craig Lewis, 68, who represented Bucks County and parts of Philadelphia for 20 years, died Sunday, Jan. 13, while swimming on Anegada in the British Virgin Islands. Sen. Lewis, who served five terms, lived in Center City. According to British Virgin Islands police, Sen. Lewis was on vacation and on a day sail at Loblolly Bay when his wife, Dianne Semingson, noticed he was facedown and motionless in the water. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The story of Lincoln University's beginnings routinely highlights the benevolent white Presbyterian minister who founded the first degree-granting institution for African Americans. The Rev. John Miller Dickey started the historically black university in Chester County. James Ralston Amos and his brother, Thomas Henry Amos, were students, among the first to graduate. But in a retelling that shakes up a 160-year history, Cheryl Reneé Gooch, a dean at the school, elevates the Amos brothers' contribution.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The gulf was not immediately apparent as Alex Klein spoke Wednesday. The 24-year-old tech entrepreneur was low-key as he chatted up juniors and seniors at Kensington Creative and Performing Arts High School - casual in a checkered shirt, Nikes with a pink swoosh, and holding a small cup of Dunkin' Donuts coffee. "Is that cool?" Klein asked before passing around a box containing the $150, build-it-yourself Kano computer he has invented and is turning into a global company with help from Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holland Hunter, 92, of Haverford, an expert on Russian transportation policy and professor emeritus of economics at Haverford College, died Saturday, Jan. 18, of pneumonia at the Quadrangle in Haverford. Dr. Hunter grew up in Geneva, Ill., the son of real estate developer Harry Holland Hunter and Hester Hunter, an advertising copywriter. He graduated from the Fountain Valley School in Colorado and received his bachelor's degree in economics from Haverford College in 1943. After completing a master's degree in 1947 and a doctorate in 1949, both in economics from Harvard University, he returned to Haverford College.
NEWS
September 30, 2012
At 27, Martha Carey Thomas applied to be president of a newly formed women's college in Bryn Mawr. She didn't get the job, but was hired as dean and an English professor in 1884. After 10 years at Bryn Mawr College, she was elected its president in 1894. Thomas (she preferred to go by M. Carey or Carey) was born in 1857 in Baltimore. She grew up with a strong determination to attain a higher education, despite her father's wishes otherwise. She was educated at Cornell and Johns Hopkins Universities.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
Jacques Barzun, a Columbia University historian and administrator whose sheer breadth of scholarship - culminating in a survey of 500 years of Western civilization - brought him renown as one of the foremost intellectuals of the 20th century, died Oct. 25 in San Antonio, where he had lived in recent years. He was 104. His son-in-law Gavin Parfit confirmed his death, the Associated Press reported. Barzun was 92 when he published what is widely regarded as his masterwork, From Dawn to Decadence, 500 Years of Western Cultural Life: 1500 to the Present . Journalist David Gates spoke for a majority of critics when he wrote in Newsweek magazine that the book, which appeared in 2000, "will go down in history as one of the great one-man shows of Western letters.
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