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Graffiti

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NEWS
September 4, 2001
One thing about graffiti taggers: they leave behind lots of destruction, but very few actual words, so it's tempting to ask, when you see their work: "What were they THINKING?" That's why we're publishing these excerpts from Web sites devoted to the defense of graffiti. - The Editors FROM: "Hows and Why of the War on Graffiti. Things every graff artist should know!!" By Zener, Praez and Chris Caruso of the Kensington Welfare Rights Union: www.geocities.com/SoHo/Museum/ 1519/ war_on_graff.
NEWS
October 12, 2007
LET'S EXAMINE the graffiti thing (editorial, Oct. 10). Graffiti is NOT nasty when done the right way. I've seen graffiti that would make famous artists look twice in amazement. Tagging on any property is ugly - but graf artists are extremely talented and some might not have a chance to show any respectable, established artist or business what they can do. Who's to say that businesses can't benefit from graffiti intended to advertise the business? These cats that are "bombers" are some talented homemade artists who have some of the same knowledge and expertise that established artists have, without all the studies.
NEWS
April 24, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
If you have the volunteering bug but don't have a project, you have two days to sign up for this one: Zero Tolerance Day II, the kickoff event for the School District's anti-graffiti program. Saturday morning, hundreds of students, faculty and volunteers will paint over graffiti, clean up yards, plant shrubs and do other beautifying projects in more than 22 schools. More schools will do projects on other weekends throughout May. This is the second year for the program, co-sponsored by the Daily News.
NEWS
January 15, 1987
In a Dec. 28 article on graffiti, the question of whether graffiti is art or vandalism was raised. An officer, who exists outside our "subculture" responded, "the whole point is rep" and that graffiti is ugly and could not be considered artistic. Well, unfortunately, this investigative officer has wasted both your time and his. Writing one's name on walls incorporates a specific style. Writers who deviate from this implicit style of writing are considered outcasts; they are not tolerated.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parents and guardians will be held responsible when their children destroy or damage property under a new ordinance approved by the City Council to help erase the local graffiti problem. Under the ordinance, which was passed Tuesday parents or guardians of youths younger than 18 would face up to 90 days in jail or $2,000 in fines for each violation. A municipal judge also could order the parents or guardians to clean, paint or restore damaged property. The youths would face a hearing in the juvenile domestic relations court.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
They're the graffiti-busters, cops whose beat is nabbing the spray-paint vandals and wall scrawlers in West Philadelphia. But Wednesday was anything but routine for the four undercover cops. They tracked down and arrested a murder suspect. And it was a suspect in not just any homicide case. It was the high-profile, purse-snatching-turned-fatal-stabbing of Vladimir Sled, a University of Pennsylvania biophysicist who was slain on Halloween night while walking home from campus with his fiancee.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | By Richard V. Sabatini and Bill Price, Inquirer Staff Writers
Some fortune tellers read tea leaves. Nick Tamaro and Bill Bain read walls. But unlike some readers who may predict good fortune, the news that Tamaro and Bain deliver is always bad. Tamaro and Bain, both from the Northeast, are members of the Police Department's Preventive Patrol Unit and are trained to read graffiti. They are participating in a major crackdown against high-profile wall-writers in the city. In a little over a year, the unit, headed by Capt. Al Lewis, has made nearly 100 arrests for wall-writing in the city.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | By Matthew Futterman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The graffiti mystery that has confounded officials for months may have come to an end Tuesday when police arrested a local high school student on numerous counts of criminal mischief. Police took Washington Township High School senior Mandel Harris, 19, into custody at the end of the school day Tuesday. Police said they soon uncovered several pieces of evidence linking Harris to more than three dozen cases of graffiti that included the word sour on private and government property throughout the community.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
They looked tiny against the backdrop of the tall, expansive masses of stone and brick. Elizabeth Barone was kneeling in the front yard of Bok Technical High School in South Philly planting palm-sized begonias. William Wallace was reaching up with his paint roller to cover new graffiti on the back wall of Sayre Middle School in West Philly. Young Jason McDowell was sweeping away dirt and trash behind Bryant Elementary School in Cobbs Creek. These people were among the small armies of students, school faculty and parents doing what they could to change those long-time magnets for graffiti and trash into pleasant places to learn.
NEWS
October 21, 1986 | By JOE O'DOWD and JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writers
Seven alleged "high-profile writers" - alias graffiti artists - were arrested today and charged with causing almost $35,000 in damage to buses and buildings over the past 1 1/2 months. Juvenile Aid Inspector William Bergman said the suspects, including three juveniles, did the most damage to buses parked at SEPTA's major operating headquarters at 200 W. Wyoming Ave. Bergman said the damage to the buses occurred on three separate occasions - Aug. 28, Aug. 30 and Sept. 3 - and totaled $31,500.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Imagine my surprise when I got home to discover my fiancée had lovingly had my name tattooed on a private area of her body. For me, tattoos represent low-life, trailer-trash graffiti of the body. To be fair, I don't recall ever having discussed my views of such with her, so I tried to feign some enthusiasm: "Wow, honey, I can't believe you did that. I feel so . . . honored. " Privately, I'm really kind of bummed out about it, and the prospect of watching that thing age and stretch over the years is totally turning me off. No, I won't break off the engagement over this, but what on earth do I do to not be repulsed by this, and how do I make sure it never happens again?
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
THERE IS NO graffiti on the quiet East Germantown block of redbrick rowhouses where Darryl McCray lives. His home is modest, with a pink hydrangea bush out front. A black-and-white cat sleeps beneath a beige patio chair. For McCray, 62, it's a subdued existence, considering that at one time he had celebrity status due entirely to the nickname he spray-painted all over Philadelphia: Cornbread . Legend has it that at age 17 he hopped a fence at the Philadelphia Zoo to spray-paint "Cornbread Lives" on the hind side of an elephant, a stunt to disprove a newspaper article that had mistakenly declared "Cornbread Shot to Death" about a murder outside a bar at 40th and Filbert Streets in West Philly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Make your way past the Port Richmond Village Shopping Center, weave underneath I-95, dodge the cars drag-racing down Beach Street, and you'll reach a locked gate. Hop over, slip around, or duck under it and you're on the well-worn path to what's known as Graffiti Pier - a postindustrial ruin, open-air art gallery, and informal park that has, in recent years, become perhaps Philadelphia's worst-kept secret.   Graffiti Pier // Philadelphia, PA from Adam Englehart on Vimeo . The 500-foot-long pier has long drawn teenagers from the River Wards to drink beer and ride dirt bikes.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A MURAL that included embattled comedian Bill Cosby among civil-rights crusaders was wiped away Tuesday after spray-painters had tagged it with phrases including "rapist" and "dudes with ludes. " The Father's Day Rally Committee's mural on Broad Street near Indiana Avenue was painted over with a gray coat, according to Jane Golden, the Mural Arts Program's executive director. "It was attracting a lot of graffiti," Golden told the Daily News yesterday. "We moved it up on our decommission list.
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fairhill Elementary School haunted Pepón Osorio: a boxy, unlovely structure at Sixth and Somerset, all graffiti, trash, and broken promises. The artist and professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art often rode his bicycle past the building, one of two dozen schools the Philadelphia School District closed in 2013. "There was a sense of abandonment around the building, of lifelessness," said Osorio, whose work often touches social-justice themes. "And the idea came to me: What if I reactivate this area?
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Nothing all that unusual seemed likely to unfold at the Philadelphia Orchestra's second consecutive subscription week with principal guest conductor Stéphane Denève: A potentially pop-slanted John Williams film score suite; Graffiti , a choral work by the increasingly popular Magnus Lindberg; and excerpts from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet ballet. Yet the orchestra, Philadelphia Singers Chorale, and the audience had plenty to contend with at Thursday's concert, which was one of the more distinctive programs of the season - a confounding, mixed success.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Someone spray-painted the N-word on a sign at the entrance of Lincoln University overnight, according to a message sent to the university community Thursday morning. Public safety officers at the university in Chester County discovered the graffiti on its northwest corner entrance sign at 1:50 a.m., and the word was gone later Thursday morning, officials said. "This incident is a sober reminder that our forebearers persevered in the face of hatred and intimidation, yet achieved and maintained standards for excellence which Lincoln University has become known," acting president Valerie I. Harrison told the university community.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 50 people - including religious leaders, political officials, and community members - gathered in Yardley on Friday afternoon to denounce an anti-Semitic slur apparently spray-painted onto a family's garage door this week. Organized by State Rep. Steve Santarsiero (D., Bucks), the event featured speeches from him and Lower Makefield Township Supervisor Jeff Benedetto as well as two rabbis, a nun, a Presbyterian pastor, a representative from a local Islamic group, and other community members.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Ma, For The Inquirer
Graffiti crawl up exterior walls like webs of ivy, bending and twisting around rows of shuttered windows. At some street corners, layers of posters pile unevenly over this graffiti like papier mâché, stitching together urban blocks. When I traveled to Greece this year, my original itinerary focused on ancient history sites: the Parthenon, the National Archaeological Museum, and the Agora. These places all tell valuable Greek stories from centuries past through classical busts, orderly columns, and symmetrical ruins.
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