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Grammar

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NEWS
April 1, 1991
In this space last week, we noted that a reader had accused the Daily News of failing to correct "improper grammar" when quoting African-Americans and Latin-Americans. She charged that we correct errors in quotes from a "white family. " Another reader claimed that when we quoted Councilman Francis Rafferty, editors "left all his bad grammar intact. " Here's what other readers think: The woman who criticized the Daily News . . . is dead wrong. I would call it good reporting.
NEWS
March 25, 1991
In a Letter to the Editor last week, Melva Rooney of Philadelphia accused the Daily News of failing to correct "improper grammar" when quoting African-Americans and Latin-Americans. She wrote: "If the article dealt with a white family, one will read proper grammar because the Daily News would correct errors. " But reader T. Harvey wrote to disagree: "She obviously has never read articles in the paper when stories about Councilman Francis Rafferty have left all his bad grammar intact.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edith Schwager, 95, a medical editor and author who wrote a grammarian's curmudgeon column under the name "Dear Edie," died Wednesday, Oct. 17, of natural causes at Wesley Enhanced Living at Stapeley in Germantown. Mrs. Schwager worked for more than a decade as an editor in the department of medicine at Hahnemann Medical College, now part of Drexel University. She then moved to Dorland Sweeney Jones, a health-information firm on South Broad Street. The company is now a worldwide conglomerate.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Inhibited writers and cowering English students can relax. It is now officially safe to selectively split your infinitives. The newest edition of A Dictionary of Modern American Usage from the prestigious Oxford University Press says it is so. Some of the nation's sterner English teachers - you know who they are - may be appalled. Certainly, the release of the Oxford Press' edition in England last year caused a furor among language purists there. But here in the United States, the news is being greeted more quietly.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
A 5-year-old boy is caught in a legal tug-of-war between his estranged parents. Both have been waging a messy custody fight. The boy's mother lives in Rhode Island. His father lives in Carbon County, Pa. Last year, little Zachary Wiskowski's father, Ronald, won the right to have him throughout the school year. This week, the state Superior Court overturned that ruling and said Zachary must be turned over to his mother, Karen, by the end of the month. The father can have him on holidays and during the summer.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | By Mary Croke
There's a mural I drive by all the time in Germantown that makes me crazy. It covers the side of a two-story building, and in the middle of this big picture is an inspiring message in big black letters. And in the middle of the inspiring message is a (scre-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e - fingernail on blackboard) grammar mistake. I've learned to avert my eyes, but my mind still fills with violent fantasies of crossing out that wrong word and replacing it with the right one. In black. In big black letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
FEW OF THE Bureau Chiefs have actually met face to face, despite writing a book together and running the Fake AP Stylebook (@fakeapstylebook), a Twitter feed that exists solely to lampoon the conventions of good grammar and style. "We're 90 percent online friends," said Ken Lowery, one of the 15 official members of the Bureau Chiefs and co-founder of the feed. "I don't know if I will meet them ever," admitted contributor RJ White, a South Philly resident. But who needs human contact anyway?
NEWS
October 10, 2004 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Old friends Albert DiSanto and Santo Apa stood at the airport Thursday waiting for her flight to arrive. Would they recognize her? It had been 45 years. Finally, she appeared and delight covered their faces like too much chocolate cake. Someone asked, "Is that your grandmother?" The two 59-year-old men said no. It was Mrs. Golden, their English teacher at Bartlett Junior High School. The reunion had begun. If you are one of the lucky ones, you had a special teacher, someone who inspired and pushed and, maybe, even changed the direction of your life.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2007 | By Elizabeth Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I'm a grammar nerd. I admit it. Actually, I even embrace it. I get a secret thrill every time someone asks me to look over a paper or a cover letter, and I delight in adding semicolons and changing who to whom. But the excitement I feel sprinkling in commas is nothing to the revulsion that grips me when I receive an instant message that reads, "hey i haven't talked 2 u in 4ever :). " Oh, the pain. Not only is the eye immediately accosted by the lack of capitalization and punctuation, but the deadly trifecta of 2, u, and 4 are also present, along with the stomach-turning smiley-face "emoticon.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Sofia Westin, DOWNINGTOWN EAST HIGH SCHOOL
At Downingtown East High School, teacher Amy Tordone has to compete with Twitter and Facebook for students' attention. She also knows that her students must work on skills often missing from a world of 140-character tweets and minute-by-minute status updates. So Tordone has changed her curriculum by reemphasizing basic concepts, ways of thinking, and note-taking in her Advanced Placement Government class. She always has something for students to read, then follows it up with some form of social media.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Sofia Westin, DOWNINGTOWN EAST HIGH SCHOOL
At Downingtown East High School, teacher Amy Tordone has to compete with Twitter and Facebook for students' attention. She also knows that her students must work on skills often missing from a world of 140-character tweets and minute-by-minute status updates. So Tordone has changed her curriculum by reemphasizing basic concepts, ways of thinking, and note-taking in her Advanced Placement Government class. She always has something for students to read, then follows it up with some form of social media.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edith Schwager, 95, a medical editor and author who wrote a grammarian's curmudgeon column under the name "Dear Edie," died Wednesday, Oct. 17, of natural causes at Wesley Enhanced Living at Stapeley in Germantown. Mrs. Schwager worked for more than a decade as an editor in the department of medicine at Hahnemann Medical College, now part of Drexel University. She then moved to Dorland Sweeney Jones, a health-information firm on South Broad Street. The company is now a worldwide conglomerate.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Stephen J. Pytak, POTTSVILLE REPUBLICAN-HERALD
POTTSVILLE, Pa. - In the age of Facebook posts, emoticons, and tweets, English grammar may appear to be on the road to extinction. "One of the more apparent problems we see in student writing is a carryover of 'texting' language," said Leslie Kraft, a ninth-grade English teacher at Pottsville Area High School. Brandon Kessock, a Pottsville Area freshman, said he'd experienced it. "Texting affects us a lot," he said. "I get so used to texting that I mess up a lot of easy words.
SPORTS
November 10, 2011 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Paul VI girls' basketball program will honor the late Carol Harris with a grammar-school basketball tournament, and participants are still needed. Mrs. Harris, 64, a former varsity girls' basketball coach at Paul VI and teacher at the school for 40 years, died last month of cancer. This year's grammar-school tournament at Paul VI will be named the Carol "Stutz" Harris Memorial Tournament. Games in the eight-team tournament will be held Dec. 28, 29, and 30. Three more teams are needed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
FEW OF THE Bureau Chiefs have actually met face to face, despite writing a book together and running the Fake AP Stylebook (@fakeapstylebook), a Twitter feed that exists solely to lampoon the conventions of good grammar and style. "We're 90 percent online friends," said Ken Lowery, one of the 15 official members of the Bureau Chiefs and co-founder of the feed. "I don't know if I will meet them ever," admitted contributor RJ White, a South Philly resident. But who needs human contact anyway?
SPORTS
September 27, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Paul Szulewski used to be a good soccer player. Now, he's a great cross-country runner. That's because of his speed, stamina, skill and determination. It's also because of his parents. Szulewski was a distance runner in spring track as a grammar-school athlete. But he was a soccer player in the fall. He even played soccer for Williamstown High School as a ninth-grader. But mom and dad knew best. They convinced him that cross-country would be a good sport for him. "I was so stubborn," Szulewski said.
NEWS
September 26, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Szulewski used to be a good soccer player. Now, he's a great cross-country runner. That's because of his speed, stamina, skill and determination. It's also because of his parents. Szulewski was a distance runner in spring track as a grammar-school athlete. But he was a soccer player in the fall. He even played soccer for Williamstown High School as a ninth-grader. But mom and dad knew best. They convinced him that cross-country would be a good sport for him. "I was so stubborn," Szulewski said.
NEWS
July 2, 2010 | Daily News Staff Report
How tweet it isn't. Kelsey Grammer's third wife, Camille, filed for divorce in a Los Angeles court yesterday, seeking to end their 13-year union. The Emmy-winning sitcom giant broke the sad news on Twitter, reports E! Online. "Hello everyone thank you for ur support and Yes it's TRUE Camille and I are Divorcing. I ask U 2 respect our privacy in these difficult times," Grammer tweeted. According to the petition, Grammer's missus (Camille Donatacci) cited irreconcilable differences and is seeking primary custody of the couple's 8-year-old daughter, Mason, and 5-year-old son, Jude, as well as child and spousal support.
NEWS
February 25, 2009 | By Patricia T. O'Conner and Stewart Kellerman
Since his election, President Obama has been roundly criticized by bloggers for using I instead of me in phrases like "a very personal decision for Michelle and I," "the main disagreement with John and I," or "graciously invited Michelle and I. " The rule here, according to conventional wisdom, is that we use I as a subject and me as an object, whether the pronoun appears by itself or in a twosome. Thus, every I in the quotes above ought to be a me. So should the president go stand in a corner of the Oval Office (if he can find one)
NEWS
January 25, 2009 | By Steven Pinker
In 1969, Neil Armstrong appeared to have omitted an indefinite article as he stepped onto the moon and left earthlings puzzled over the difference between man and mankind. In 1980, Jimmy Carter, accepting his party's nomination, paid homage to a former vice president he called Hubert Horatio Hornblower. On Tuesday, Chief Justice John Roberts joined the Flubber Hall of Fame when he administered the presidential oath of office apparently without notes. Instead of having Barack Obama "solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of president of the United States," Roberts had him "solemnly swear that I will execute the office of president to the United States faithfully.
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