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Grand Canyon

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the nearly 10 years since Lawrence Kasdan defined the anxieties and dashed hopes of a generation in The Big Chill, we have come to worry about global warming. Nonetheless, the temperature is much colder and the world an infinitely harsher place in Grand Canyon. Because Kasdan's ambitious film is a free-ranging ensemble piece that gives a pivotal role to Kevin Kline, the temptation to regard it as a companion volume to The Big Chill is inevitable. But Grand Canyon reaches farther without having the grasp of the earlier film, whose many merits include the launching or boosting of several major movie careers (Kline, William Hurt, Jeff Goldblum, JoBeth Williams and Glenn Close)
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Dorothy Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
I'm not sure where I was colder or more exhilarated: at House Rock Rapid on the Colorado River when a gigantic wave drenched me with 47-degree water, nearly tossing me out of the raft, or on the climb into Silver Grotto, requiring swims though a series of bone-chilling pools. Or where I felt more at peace: gratefully devouring a huge plate of hot lasagna after an exhausting day on the river, or snuggling down into my sleeping bag on a white sand beach in the Grand Canyon under a starry sky. Or where I felt more awed: upon reaching, on the fifth day, the dark, jagged 1.7-billion-year-old walls of the inner gorge; or watching lightning bolt across the canyon as I sat precariously on a narrow ledge near ancient Indian granaries.
SPORTS
March 23, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Rodney Johns scored a career-high 41 points, including the game-winning basket with two seconds remaining in overtime, to lead Grand Canyon (Ariz.) to an 88-86 victory over Auburn-Montgomery (Ala.) last night in the championship game of the 51st NAIA tournament in Kansas City, Mo. Johns, who was voted the tournament's most valuable player, had 39 points in Grand Canyon's semifinal win over Waynesburg (Pa.), in which he also hit the winning shot. The title was the third in five years for the 11th-seeded Antelopes (37-6)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
As an action adventure, it's hard to beat the thrills of Grand Canyon: The Hidden Secrets, the IMAX film that rides the Colorado River rapids slicing through nature's most majestic chasm. "At one point, I felt like I was water-skiing with a drunk driver," reported my companion Morgan, nearly 9, at a preview screening. So effective are the film's you-are-there perspectives that you wipe away imagined whitewater from your brow when you're not holding onto your armrest for dear life.
SPORTS
August 27, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Ottawa Senators left wing Phil Bourque likely will be sidelined at least two months after suffering facial fractures and two fractured neck vertebrae in a rock-climbing accident near the Grand Canyon. Bourque had climbed about 350 feet up a 500-foot cliff Saturday at Lone Rock Canyon off Lake Powell, north of the Grand Canyon, when he fell about 30 feet and landed on a rock-strewn terrace, authorities said. It took four hours to rescue Bourque from the cliff by helicopter.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | By Eric Harrison, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vultures - a familiar sight - were circling in the canyon. Solitary and strangely majestic, the carrion hunters soared over the Colorado River gorge within sight of the trail that follows the canyon's southern rim. Tourists stood at the top of the canyon, their cameras trained on colorful rock formations and steep walls, as other tourists not far away were queuing up for helicopter and airplane rides over the scenic wonder. Two days after a De Havilland Otter twin-engine plane and a Bell Jet Ranger helicopter collided in midair, killing 25 people, visitors continued to flock to the popular attraction.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | Staff Report
A hiker whose body was found near Yaki Point in the Grand Canyon National Park was that of 41-year-old Peter Reichner of Glenside, Pa., officials said. The National Park Service said Reichner's body was found Jan. 12, next to the South Kaibab Trail about one-third mile from the trailhead located near Yaki Point on the South Rim. Reichner died of injuries sustained in a fall, the Park Service said, adding the investigation is ongoing. Additional details are not yet available.
NEWS
July 9, 1986
The June 23 editorial "Chaos at Grand Canyon: Put limits on aircraft" was one of the most ill-informed and misleading pieces on air safety I have read. To the uninformed, the term "uncontrolled" airspace presents a picture of thousands of airplanes vying for the same airspace and indiscriminately crashing into one another everywhere you look. All it really means is pilots' keeping distance between each other using their vision and common sense rather than relying on air traffic controllers to tell them where to be and where other aircraft are. As a user of both controlled and uncontrolled airports (with myself piloting the aircraft)
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Felicia Fonseca, Associated Press
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER GORGE, Ariz. - Florida aerialist Nik Wallenda completed a tightrope walk that took him a quarter mile over the Little Colorado River Gorge in northeastern Arizona on Sunday. Wallenda performed the stunt on a two-inch-thick steel cable, 1,500 feet above the river on the Navajo Nation near the Grand Canyon. He took just more than 22 minutes, pausing and crouching twice as winds whipped around him so that he could get "the rhythm out of the rope. " "Thank you Lord.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Felicia Fonseca, Associated Press
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. - Generations of Navajo families have grazed livestock on a remote but spectacular mesa that overlooks the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers. This is the East Rim of the majestic Grand Canyon - the last with no significant development. But ancestral tradition and the tranquillity of the landscape could be subject to change if the Navajo government's plans are realized for a resort and aerial tramway that would ferry tourists from cliff tops to water's edge.
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TRAVEL
August 1, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Bears and wolves are the animals most visitors at Yellowstone National Park want to see, our wildlife guide says as he scans a lush valley often called the Serengeti of the West. Not me. I already had a wildlife encounter that morning in mid-June before the tour began. At dawn, a pair of rusty-red baby bison emerged from a thick mist and approached the SUV my husband was driving as we crept along a road in the world's first national park. Four eyes had stared at me, just inches away, and one tiny bison attempted a deep grunt and then caught up to his mother.
TRAVEL
April 24, 2016 | By Donna Maccherone, For The Inquirer
A lissome 15-year-old boy with wild hair stood on the edge - I mean the sliver-of-a-spit-of-the-edge - on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon, the March wind billowing his shirt. His back was to the glorious striations of the canyon walls, the heels of his Keds precariously trim with that edge. He seemed more bird than human, with his arms spread as though ready for takeoff. His grin was as big as the firmament above him. Awesome and amazing. Two words so overused we hardly react to them.
TRAVEL
April 4, 2016
This year marks the 100th anniversary of what novelist and environmentalist Wallace Stegner called "the best idea we ever had," the founding of the National Park Service. The greatest hits - Yellowstone, Yosemite, and the Grand Canyon - attract carloads by the millions, but many parks can be visited in absolute solitude. Often, a smaller park or historic sight boasts a powerful but little-known story about America's heritage. Here are a few of our favorites: Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site , Buffalo.
TRAVEL
November 16, 2015 | By David Heller and Jill Richman-Heller, For The Inquirer
There is a moment during travel when relaxation kicks into gear. For us, it came in increments, beginning the moment we arrived in Honolulu. Straight out of our gate, we were steps from the outdoors and soft breezes that carried the scent of native flowers. Tourism is the basis of the economy on the Hawaiian Islands, and everyone we met had an unusually warm and welcoming attitude, in the spirit of "aloha. " We had been to touristy towns before, but not even in the Magic Kingdom were the people as mellow as they were kind and helpful.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan and Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
Jacquell Rountree and his brother Dominic had never gotten along. Jacquell, also known as "Fray," was 31; Dominic was 29. They lived together in a house on Kershaw Street in Parkside. And they fought, often, over everything. Clothes. Bikes. The basement rooms that they occupied. "The only time they really got along was when they were sleeping," their mother, Valerie Pickens-Rountree, who lives nearby on Girard Avenue, said Wednesday. On Monday evening, her youngest daughter banged on her front door, shaking.
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE SIGNIFICANT others of the Virginia journalists gunned down yesterday by a disgruntled former co-worker both grew up in the Philly area. Adam Ward, 27, and Alison Parker, 24, were shot just before 7 a.m. by Vester Lee Flanagan II, a former employee of WDBJ, a CBS affiliate in Roanoke, Va. Flanagan turned the gun on himself yesterday afternoon as he was being chased by police on Interstate 66. Both victims grew up near Roanoke, about 400...
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following a national trend to pair pretty public places with healthier, tastier food choices - beyond the usual fare of hamburgers, hotdogs, and ice cream - New Jersey officials are seeking vendors to bring "high quality" food service to Island Beach State Park this summer. "We're basically just looking to enhance the Island Beach experience for our park-goers," said Bob Considine, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection. "You have people who go there because it's a destination and you have people who go every weekend to be on the beach.
SPORTS
November 10, 2014 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
ARE THE visions of greatness in the desert a mirage or is Arizona for real? There's the Duke freshman who carries the memory of his mom and the Duquesne kid who has licked cancer. The annual college basketball preview is rolling through and the only thing that we're willing to stop for is a performance by the Yale kid who is taking a year off to get his Whiffenpoof on. What's a Whiffenpoof? See No. 9. 1 Kentucky might have more first-round picks on its roster than the Sixers.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As David and Betty Hasiuk rode through the clouds in a small airplane delivering mail to a remote Alaskan wilderness last month, the Bucks County couple realized the adventure was one of their most unusual. The plane was the only way to reach Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, which had been among the few national parks that the retired Warrington Township couple had not yet visited. When the plane landed, they saw a handful of local residents waiting on the tiny runway for letters and packages.
TRAVEL
July 21, 2014 | By Judd Kruger Levingston, For The Inquirer
'Did you make it to the bottom?" everyone asked when we got back from the Grand Canyon. "Of course we did," I answered - but it took five days and a father-son journey to get there. My son Ivan and I have enjoyed backpacking in the Pennsylvania wilderness, and our appetite for the Southwest was whetted four years ago on a family trip to Grand Canyon National Park. Ivan and I hiked most of the way down until an early sunset and common sense led us to pledge to come back to celebrate my 50th birthday with a father-son backpacking trip.
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