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Granddad

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SPORTS
June 21, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baseball was still a curiosity, not a national pastime. Horse racing, with all its gambling, attracted an unsavory crowd. And there wasn't yet a single 18-hole golf course in the nation. In the decade before the Civil War, rowing was the sport of choice for America's aristocrats, particularly those living in the old cities along the Eastern seaboard. An astonishing crowd of 50,000 had lined New York harbor in 1824 for a row between British and American four-man crews. Boston's Brahmins gathered for weekend races along the Charles River.
NEWS
October 30, 1997 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Percy E. Custus Jr., retired big-rig driver who liked to preside over his family as its authoritative head but who did it with such humor that what usually reigned was laughter, died last Thursday of lung cancer. He was 70 and lived in "The Bottom" section of West Philadelphia. "Sitting in his chair, right now, feels funny," said Carmen McGriff, one of his grandchildren. "I'm waiting for him to come in and say, 'Git outta my chair, right now!' If you didn't move out of his chair, you'd get ready for the third degree.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS not a good idea for the children or friends of Earl Morton Washington Jr. to be playing hooky on Germantown Avenue when he was driving the Route 23 Trolley. "He would stop the trolley with passengers in the middle of the street, get out and yell at whomever he saw, telling them to get their butts back to school," his family said. "Many passengers would agree with him and yell out the window, 'Yeah, that's right, get back in school!' " That was the kind of dad, granddad and great-granddad Earl was - deeply committed to education and hard work, and not very tolerant when he encountered those who didn't agree with him. Earl Washington, a SEPTA trolley operator for 39 years, Army veteran of World War II and active churchman, died of pneumonia and heart failure Nov. 29. He was 92 and lived in Mount Airy.
NEWS
May 2, 1992 | By David Lee Preston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shawn Murray barely knew his grandfather, but his father had told him plenty about the former news photographer. Ah, the stories: Granddad, at first a truck driver at the old Philadelphia Ledger who then talked his way onto the photo staff; Granddad perched precariously atop the yet-unfinished Delaware River Bridge in 1925, capturing Philadelphia from an entirely new angle; Granddad's flash going off in a Philadelphia courtroom to snap the '20s...
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | By THOMAS BUBECK, Daily News Staff Writer
Had one of those days when you feel like the world's jacked you up and stolen your tires? Need a little entertainment to let you cruise through life without shocking you like a Diehard battery? "License to Drive" may be just the ticket. Starring two teen-age heartthrobs named Corey (Haim and Feldman), "License" marks a young man's rites of passage in the passing lane. Sixteen-year-old Les (Haim) lives with an Einstein of a twin sister (Nina Siemaszko), a dad who's about as smart as your average carburetor (Richard Masur)
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The tiny old woman in the straw hat stood in the cemetery at stooped attention as the bagpipers passed. She wore canvas shoes, and a brown pocketbook slung over her right shoulder. In her left hand she clutched a large cavalry saber. The woman, Mary Savage, 86, then fell in behind the soldiers, who were perspiring with their blue uniforms and heavy muskets. She chuckled as she tried to stay ahead of Bruiser, the gigantic police horse that was being led behind. Down the macadam path they all went yesterday - the pipes minglng with the sound of distant church bells, the humid air smelling of cut grass - past the silent stone angels and bleached obelisks to the forgotten spot where "Granddad" was buried.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | By Bill Barber
Today, with political correctness insinuating itself deeply into all aspects of our communications, from newspaper columnists to television newscasts and sitcoms, there is still one segment of our society that seems to be fair game for ridicule. That segment is the elderly. You can't watch a family sitcom now without seeing Granddad or Grandma depicted as being uncool, disoriented or just plain stupid. They can't drive well (too slow), they are old-fashioned ("now in my day. . . ")
NEWS
June 25, 2004 | By ELMER SMITH
BILL Clinton's psychiatrist is nothing like the guy I was seeing a few years ago. We used to meet in his office where he sat for 50 minutes pretending to pay rapt attention to my stream-of-consciousness answer to the one question he'd ask at the start of the session. He spoke only two sentences: "Tell me what's going on with you today. " And "Our 50 minutes is up. " Ultimately, I left his nurturing care after deciding that I could hear myself talk for a lot less than $100 an hour.
NEWS
March 14, 1996 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert Lee Lockett, writer, former publisher and public relations director and retired manager of consumer relations for the Food and Drug Administration, died Friday. He was 73 and lived in East Mount Airy. Lockett had a combined federal service of more than 30 years when he retired in 1981 from the FDA, where he was manager of consumer relations for the Philadelphia office. He had previously worked as public relations director for Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) and before that at the Frankford Arsenal, where he began as a copywriter and reached an editorial position.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Blanche K. "Mom-Mom" Ford, who possessed a gift for controlling and caring for large numbers of children with a smoothness that baffled other adults, died Saturday. She was 85 and lived in South Philadelphia. Mom-Mom Ford raised 16 foster children besides her own natural children and kept her home open to uncounted grandchildren, great-grandchildren and all those children's friends. But an outsider wouldn't have been able to tell who was blood and who was not. They all came under the same gentle hand and patient voice of Mom-Mom.
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NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
An army of federal agents, bomb-sniffing K-9 dogs, and local police protected Vice President Biden and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at Franklin Field on Sunday night while Trump watched his daughter Tiffany and Biden saw his granddaughter Naomi graduate from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Arts & Sciences. Trump arrived to warm applause from his section but when Biden arrived a few minutes later, the entire stadium erupted in cheering and waving, and he responded by vigorously waving back.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I have a problem I am not proud of. My daughter is pregnant, and, so far, everything in her pregnancy is routine. When I was pregnant with our three kids, my husband was typical for our generation in terms of the involvement he showed during my pregnancy and even my kids' infant years. But now that our daughter is pregnant, he has shown more interest in her than pretty much every pregnancy I had combined. He downloaded an app for his phone that gives weekly updates of the baby's size, changed all his photos to the ultrasound photo, and even spent hours researching car seats for our car so we can drive the baby around.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Lou Rabito, Inquirer Columnist
Megan Vermeil is the first Vermeil girl to play field hockey, which might explain why her famous grandfather doesn't know too much about the sport. "Whenever he tries to give me field hockey pointers, he's like, 'Oh, never mind, I don't know anything,' " she said. "He'll be like, 'Take it in to them and shoot around them.' And I'm like, 'It's a lot harder than it looks.' " Somehow, Dick Vermeil's youngest grandchild is making it seem easier than it looks. The Villa Maria junior is playing in the state tournament for the first time and has taken on a lead role on the raised stage.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS not a good idea for the children or friends of Earl Morton Washington Jr. to be playing hooky on Germantown Avenue when he was driving the Route 23 Trolley. "He would stop the trolley with passengers in the middle of the street, get out and yell at whomever he saw, telling them to get their butts back to school," his family said. "Many passengers would agree with him and yell out the window, 'Yeah, that's right, get back in school!' " That was the kind of dad, granddad and great-granddad Earl was - deeply committed to education and hard work, and not very tolerant when he encountered those who didn't agree with him. Earl Washington, a SEPTA trolley operator for 39 years, Army veteran of World War II and active churchman, died of pneumonia and heart failure Nov. 29. He was 92 and lived in Mount Airy.
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It usually goes the same at the start of each school year. Unfamiliar teachers, calling out the roll for the first time, will ask Jack Ashburn if he's related to a certain Ashburn who starred for the Phillies and was also a well-known broadcaster. "They're kind of surprised when I say, 'Yeah, that's my grandfather,' " the 17-year-old said. The Phoenixville High senior was 3 when Richie Ashburn died, and doesn't remember any interaction with the beloved outfielder. But family gatherings over the years have brought him up to speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2012 | Choose one .
Travolta accuser No. 2: Arbitration The second Anonymous Masseur who lodged a sexual battery complaint against John Travolta is willing to withdraw his lawsuit and enter arbitration, says his lawyer. "We can set up our own private trial. I'm willing to do that," Okorie Okorocha tells the New York Daily News, "and I've proposed that to [Travolta's lawyer] Marty Singer. " Adds Okorocha, "He hasn't agreed, but he hasn't said no. " Travolta has dismissed the masseurian claims against him as bogus.
FOOD
December 29, 2011 | By Joan Nathan, NEW YORK TIMES NEW SERVICE
Herring is hip and it's high-end. Long a favorite of Jewish grandfathers, herring is showing up on the menus of hip and elegant New York restaurants. Laurent Manrique serves lightly smoked herring, imported from France, with boiled potatoes at Millesime, his French bistro in Manhattan. "Surprisingly, smoked herring and quenelles de brochet are our two most popular appetizers," he said. Herring with wasabi and yuzu kosho paste is one of the haute Jewish dishes at Kutsher's Tribeca.
NEWS
May 27, 2010
Dear Harry: My wife and I have just saved her grandfather's house from foreclosure so he could continue to live there. It took us two years to get the house titled in my wife's name and to have two liens from predatory lenders removed. There is a mortgage for $51,000 that was also transferred to her, and there's still one lien from the electric company that we want to get rid of. They're hitting us with stiff interest, too. The problem is that we need $19,000 to do this, and our savings are getting a bit low. The house is worth close to $100,000.
NEWS
June 25, 2004 | By ELMER SMITH
BILL Clinton's psychiatrist is nothing like the guy I was seeing a few years ago. We used to meet in his office where he sat for 50 minutes pretending to pay rapt attention to my stream-of-consciousness answer to the one question he'd ask at the start of the session. He spoke only two sentences: "Tell me what's going on with you today. " And "Our 50 minutes is up. " Ultimately, I left his nurturing care after deciding that I could hear myself talk for a lot less than $100 an hour.
SPORTS
June 21, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baseball was still a curiosity, not a national pastime. Horse racing, with all its gambling, attracted an unsavory crowd. And there wasn't yet a single 18-hole golf course in the nation. In the decade before the Civil War, rowing was the sport of choice for America's aristocrats, particularly those living in the old cities along the Eastern seaboard. An astonishing crowd of 50,000 had lined New York harbor in 1824 for a row between British and American four-man crews. Boston's Brahmins gathered for weekend races along the Charles River.
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