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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Our Jan. 11 entry about a hairline crack in a countertop brought some expert advice and more questions, proving once more that one should never take anything for granite. The hairline crack under discussion was about 22 inches long, and was in front of the sink. The countertops are five years old, and the installer is out of business. Marty Jensen of Blue Bell spent 44 years in the granite business, and, though retired, troubleshoots for trade organizations. He said the crack may be the result of a natural fissure or could be a pressure crack caused by the method of installation.
NEWS
July 16, 2007 | By Andy Borowitz
In a bold new strategy to avoid a congressional subpoena, Vice President Cheney today declared himself a national monument. Cheney took the unorthodox step only after failing in his attempt to invoke a little-known legal principle called the separation of Cheney and state. Aides to Cheney confirmed that being a national monument gives the vice president not only immunity from subpoenas, but also a draft deferment in perpetuity. President Bush presided over a solemn White House ceremony this morning in which a plaque documenting Cheney's status as a national monument was affixed to the vice president's midsection.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | By Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
If those who are plugging for the Rocky statue to remain at the Art Museum lose out, they needn't go to the Spectrum to see a pugilistic sculpture. In fact, they needn't look any farther than the museum. Just a few dozen paces from where Rocky now stands, they can find "The Boxers," a Rocky-sized granite sculpture of two athletes locked in what the old cliche calls "the manly art of self-defense. " It was lent to the museum in 1957 by its creator, American sculptor Ahron Ben-Schmuel, and brought into the museum's permanent collection in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Five years ago, you couldn't tour a house with granite countertops in the kitchen and not hear about it. The real estate agent would proclaim its attributes, and you, as a prospective homeowner, would feel confident that those speckled surfaces were the best. Granite has been the showstopper for years, dazzling with its glossy appearance and high performance. But as more surface materials take center stage, the rock star of countertops is sharing the spotlight with materials that flaunt a hipper vibe: concrete, zinc, bamboo, even glass.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By BOB GROTEVANT, Daily News Staff Writer
Attorney General LeRoy S. Zimmerman has asked a special House committee to turn over any evidence of wrongdoing it may have gathered in connection with a $117 million addition to the state Capitol building. Zimmerman made the request yesterday in a letter to Rep. Nicholas Colafella, D-Beaver, the chairman of the House panel that heard testimony alleging kickbacks, unethical conduct and other improprieties stemming from the purchase and fabrication of $30 million worth of granite for the Capitol project.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By BOB GROTEVANT, Daily News Staff Writer
A special House committee has decided to press its investigation of possible wrongdoing in the construction of a $117 million addition to the state Capitol despite investigations by two federal grand juries and the attorney general. Rep. Nicholas Colafella, the committee's chairman, said yesterday that the committee had decided to subpoena personal financial records of two former high-ranking state General Services officials. They also agreed to the re- interview of several businessmen involved in purchase and fabrication of $30 million worth of granite for the massive project.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I had granite countertops installed in the kitchen about five years ago by Riya Imports L.L.C. in Monroe Township, N.J. There is a hairline crack about 22 inches long in front of the sink. I tried reaching the installer, but it apparently is out of business. No help was available at either Home Depot or Lowe's, or at other granite suppliers. Is there anything you can suggest other than replacing it, which is too expensive? Answer: I tried calling Riya, and the number was no longer in service.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | By Bill Price, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 5-by-5-foot granite horse trough that has stood forgotten and unused beneath a sign in Jenkintown for the last 50 years is getting a face lift. On March 8, work began that will restore the 76-year-old trough to its former condition. The trough once served as a gathering place for townsfolk and travelers in the horse-and-carriage age. It also provided a source of water for horses on hot summer days. The project has the approval of the Jenkintown Borough Council. Most of the first work day, workers blasted the trough with millions of particles of sand, peeling away decades of accumulated dirt and tar. "It's a relic of Jenkintown's history that should be maintained," said Jenkintown Lions Club president Robert J. Furlong, whose organization is sponsoring the project.
NEWS
July 12, 2001 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Philadelphia's landmark of modernist architecture, the PSFS building, underwent an extensive interior renovation a few years ago when it was converted to a Loews hotel. Now the skyscraper is undergoing a second overhaul to clean up its exterior. The famous tower is once again imprisoned in scaffolding, but this time its owner is repairing the polished granite panels that curve sensuously around the building's corner at 12th and Market Streets. The panels are being trucked in groups of 14 up to Conshohocken for repairs at Dan Lepore & Sons' masonry yard.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
House Democratic leaders will go to court to try to block a subpoena ordering a House committee chairman to testify before a federal grand jury about its continuing probe of alleged profiteering and payoffs in a Capitol construction project, officials said yesterday. Ironically, Rep. Nicholas Colafella (D., Beaver), the committee chairman, wanted to testify and has said that his committee eventually will turn over its documents to federal authorities. But hours after Colafella's announcement that he would testify Tuesday before a federal grand jury sitting in Harrisburg, the House Democratic leadership announced that it intended to go to U.S. District Court today in an attempt to keep him out, arguing separation of powers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 2, 2015
The material of the slab that seals the grave of Elva Parker was misidentified in an article Tuesday. It is granite.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The escalators still buzz up and down in the Granite Run Mall, but passengers are rare. The water trickling out of a fountain is the loudest noise in its center lobby, echoing off the glass of empty storefronts. Just 30 of 125 stores are occupied in the once-bustling Delaware County mall. Although its business has dropped in recent years, that's not the only explanation for the vacancies: The property is headed for major change. The best way to turn around the struggling mall, according to its owners, is to demolish it. What was once a classic suburban mall will be reborn as something more classically urban.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At one point during the chaos and carnage of D-Day, the USS Frankford sailed so close to Omaha Beach that it scraped bottom. The destroyer's big guns blasted German machine-gun positions and helped pinned-down GIs advance on June 6, 1944, when all seemed lost. Tom Potts, then a teenager from Moorestown, was manning an antiaircraft gun on the Frankford's deck amid the cacophony of fire - and lost most of his hearing that day 70 years ago. After numerous surgeries and hearing aids, the now-89-year-old from Upper Pittsgrove, Salem County, still has trouble following conversations and is among four million disabled service members who returned home with the lingering effects of war. Next Sunday, all of them will be honored with the dedication of the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial in Washington.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
BET Investments, the real estate investment group owned by Toll Bros. cofounder Bruce E. Toll, plans "a walkable mixed-use project" at what is now Granite Run Mall after the firm's successful bid of $24 million for the shopping center near Media. "We are very excited about the deal and its possibilities," said Michael Markman, president of BET Investments, in Horsham. New York-based Rockwood Realty Advisors conducted the sale. Banks represented by CW Capital Management foreclosed on Granite Run in 2011 after national mall owner Simon Property Group and partner Macerich Co. stopped paying interest on $115 million they had borrowed to buy the place, figuring it wasn't worth that much anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Five years ago, you couldn't tour a house with granite countertops in the kitchen and not hear about it. The real estate agent would proclaim its attributes, and you, as a prospective homeowner, would feel confident that those speckled surfaces were the best. Granite has been the showstopper for years, dazzling with its glossy appearance and high performance. But as more surface materials take center stage, the rock star of countertops is sharing the spotlight with materials that flaunt a hipper vibe: concrete, zinc, bamboo, even glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Our Jan. 11 entry about a hairline crack in a countertop brought some expert advice and more questions, proving once more that one should never take anything for granite. The hairline crack under discussion was about 22 inches long, and was in front of the sink. The countertops are five years old, and the installer is out of business. Marty Jensen of Blue Bell spent 44 years in the granite business, and, though retired, troubleshoots for trade organizations. He said the crack may be the result of a natural fissure or could be a pressure crack caused by the method of installation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I had granite countertops installed in the kitchen about five years ago by Riya Imports L.L.C. in Monroe Township, N.J. There is a hairline crack about 22 inches long in front of the sink. I tried reaching the installer, but it apparently is out of business. No help was available at either Home Depot or Lowe's, or at other granite suppliers. Is there anything you can suggest other than replacing it, which is too expensive? Answer: I tried calling Riya, and the number was no longer in service.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We recently installed new granite tile countertops and backsplash in our kitchen. We are noticing that if we place a wet object on the countertop, the granite is stained in that area. Most of the time it fades in a few days, but lately, we are noticing the dark stains staying longer. Is there any way to remove these or to prevent them in the first place? Answer: We have granite countertops and don't have this problem, so I can only tell you what other readers tell me. Most water stains are only a temporary problem.
NEWS
January 10, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian and Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
MANCHESTER, N.H. - The students in Mr. Walsh's government and politics class at Franklin High School south of Boston were up well before the crack of dawn on Monday. By 7:30, after two hours on a bus, they were eating breakfast at Moe Joe's Family Retreat, waiting to meet GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul. By 8 a.m., they'd been sucked into a political vortex and spit out the other side. It was exactly what they'd hoped for. "All of a sudden, there were all the lights," said John Weich, 18. The 76-year-old Texas congressman materialized at his table in a crush of cameras, a delicious crumb surrounded by ravenous ants.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By David Lightman, McClatchy Newspapers
DOVER, N.H. - When it comes to the politics of 2012, New Hampshire is a state of uncertainty. From Keene to Dover, voters are largely unenthusiastic about President Obama, but they're not crazy about the Republican challengers either. Folks here routinely say they're fed up with everyone and don't know what to do when they vote next year. "The candidates all say what people want to hear, and then nothing gets done," said Debbie Babineau, a Lebanon property manager.
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