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Grapes

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FOOD
March 1, 2012
Makes 6-8 servings 2 pounds red seedless    grapes, stems removed 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground black pepper    (optional) 1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. In a large mixing bowl, toss the grapes with the olive oil, salt, and pepper, if using. 2. Arrange the grapes in a single layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Roast until the grapes have wilted and given off much of their juices, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
The ship Bizen Reefer unloaded its cargo of Chilean grapes yesterday at Holt Marine Terminal in Gloucester City. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, in efforts to protect California grape growers, has ruled that no more Chilean grapes will be allowed through Philadelphia's ports this season. For the Port of Philadelphia, it's the end of a key part of the year. About two-thirds of all grapes exported to the United States from Chile arrive at the region's ports.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1987 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia officials are mounting a lobbying campaign to make fruit salad out of a federal proposal that would limit local winter imports of grapes from Chile. The lobbying is aimed at stopping a U.S. Department of Agriculture proposal to restrict duty-free imports of grapes, one small salvo in a growing international trade battle. Chilean fruit imports in the past four years have become one of the biggest money-making imports on the Delaware River waterfront, with grapes accounting for about 70 percent of the growing winter fruit and vegetable imports, according to Philadelphia Port Corp.
FOOD
September 18, 2003 | By Mary Carroll FOR THE INQUIRER
Fall table grapes are abundant in local stores now, and it's hard to resist buying a bunch. These days, any flame-colored grapes that make it past afternoon snack time at my house go into a dessert that's cool to look at and cooling to eat: a tangy ice or a grape tart. A long-ago issue of Sunset magazine inspired my idea for a lightened grape tart. A cook had mounded the crimson-hued grapes in a golden tart shell, topping them with a layer of creamy filling, then glazing with homemade port wine jelly.
FOOD
October 26, 1986 | The Inquirer staff
An unusual growing season has produced a 1986 California wine-grape crop smaller than last year's, but one pronounced by vintners as superior in quality. The annual harvest and crush weighed in at 2.7 million tons, about 4 percent below last year's, the California trade's Wine Institute reported Wednesday. Growers said they were enthusiastic over prospects for the vintage. At Zaca Mesa Winery near Santa Barbara, assistant winemaker Chuck Carlson called the new grapes "one of the most well-rounded, balanced harvests we've had. " The growing season got off to a midwinter start, thanks to an unseasonal warm spell.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1989 | By Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Two card games in a dark, grimy, longshoremen's hiring hall in South Philadelphia was where the only money could be found for about a dozen dockworkers yesterday. Normally, they'd be making about $18-an-hour unloading cases of imported Chilean fruit. But those jobs came to a sudden halt Monday night, when the federal Food and Drug Administration impounded Chilean fruit following the discovery of two poisoned grapes. As a result, 110 dockworkers left the hiring hall at International Longshoremen's Association Local 1291 without work yesterday morning.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1987 | The Inquirer Staff
U.S. District Court Judge John P. Fullam yesterday rejected a bid by Chilean grape growers and American fruit importers for an injunction to halt the imposition of tough quality standards on table grapes imported from Chile. Lawyers for the Chilean interests had said the standards would cut the volume of grapes imported to the United States, most of which move through the port of Philadelphia. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, which sets the standards, is planning to make them effective on April 20, rather than May 1 - the date they are normally imposed each year.
NEWS
September 8, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For years, the wine that Tony Valenzano Sr. and sons Anthony and Mark made from the grapes they grew was only a hobby. The real crops on the family farm in this Burlington County community were alfalfa and hay, not to mention the pigs, cows, steers, quail and pheasant they raised to sell. These days, the farm has a new look - and a new name to go with it. The Valenzano farm is now Valenzano Winery, one of 17 commercial wineries in New Jersey. More and more farmers are turning to the profitable production of wine grapes, while trying to overcome a perception that Jersey wines are not as good as those from other regions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2014
  B   UZZ: I had enough French in high school to know blanc means white. But grapes, like sauvignon blanc, are green. Shouldn't it be sauvignon vert ? Marnie: That's a good question, Buzz. Green wine grapes likely weren't dubbed "white" because they look white but to emphasize their contrast with purple grapes, which are so dark they look black on the vine. Buzz: So, you're saying winemakers think in black and white? Marnie: I guess they must, since that's how they historically named grape varieties in Europe.
NEWS
December 30, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services (Inquirer staff writer James Asher contributed to this article.)
The Environmental Protection Agency said yesterday that it would not permit table grapes to be shipped or imported in 1988 if they contain detectable residues of sulfite compounds. The compounds, which help prevent spoilage, can cause deadly allergic reactions in some people. EPA spokesman Dave Cohen said the new rule, which goes into effect Friday, requires growers to test their grapes and certify that the amount of sulfites on them is less than 10 parts per million. Although that is considered the level of detectability, no safe level has been found for the compounds, according to an officer of a consumer group that has fought the EPA for 18 months over the sulfite rules for grapes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
I just drank a bottle of improbably impressive barbera wine from . . . the Jersey Shore?! Yes, I did. And just so we can move on to the important details, let's get the snickering out of the way ASAP, both for the provenance and name of this North Cape May winery - Turdo Vineyards - which landed as a gag mention not once, but twice, by comedian Jay Leno. "What can I say, it's our last name," says Luca Turdo, 34, who makes the wines with his father, Salvatore. "My family's from Sicily, so we go to brush it off. " That's easier to do when you run a labor-of-love winery that rises above both expectations and conventions.
FOOD
July 14, 2016
Makes 6 servings 4 cups chicken stock 2 cups white wine 2 carrots, peeled and roughly chopped 2 garlic cloves, peeled 1/2 small yellow onion 3 thyme sprigs 1 stalk celery, roughly chopped plus ¼ cup minced celery 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts 1 cup red grapes, halved 2 tablespoons minced shallot 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup fat-free plain Greek yogurt ...
NEWS
May 13, 2016
BUZZ: Hey Marnie, why do they bother making white wine out of cabernet sauvignon if it's a red grape? Marnie: That's not really a thing, Buzz. I've never even seen a white cabernet. Buzz: Really? There are tons of them at the State Store. They call it sauvignon blanc. Not quite as dry as the red. How do they do that? Marnie: Easily, Buzz. Sauvignon blanc is not a white wine made from red cabernet sauvignon grapes. It's a separate grape variety. Unlike cabernet sauvignon, sauvignon blanc is green-skinned, so used for making white wines only.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
Buzz: Hey, Marnie, my brother just got back from a trip to Napa Valley. He said some wineries put other grapes in their cabernet sauvignon. Isn't that illegal? Marnie: No, Buzz, it's legal in most wine regions, as long as it's a small percentage, though in some European regions, the named grape on the bottle must be in the wine 100 percent. Buzz: Do other places require every grape to be named? Marnie: Yes. Australia requires all grapes in a wine to be named on the label, in order of volume.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | Don Russell, Daily News
LAST WEEK, The New York Times tackled the quandary of outdoor wine drinking. Specifically: How does one enjoy a fine vintage on a picnic without the proper glassware? Indeed. For starters, everyone knows it's impossible to balance a crystal Champagne flute on a cashmere blanket. Never mind those pesky bugs swarming that 2005 magnum of Saint Emilion Grand Cru. But the big question on the south lawn at the summer estate is: Cabernet goblets or claret chalices? Oh, pooh! The servants simply cannot be trusted with the Waterford decanter - not after that disastrous outing in the Hamptons when Jeeves nearly knocked it over with a croquet mallet.
NEWS
July 9, 2015
AS A CITY, we've gotten pretty good at attracting and handling crowds, and with the number of visitors growing year after year, we get more and more practice. Thanks in part to the smart management of the city's "Visit Philadelphia" tourism office, the number of visitors has increased every year for the past 18 years, with 39 million domestic visitors in 2013. This provided more than $10 billion in economic impact in that year alone, creating jobs and activity in hospitality and beyond.
TRAVEL
May 11, 2015 | By Tom Koppel, For The Inquirer
CHAMPAGNE, France - Tiny bubbles rise and burst as Nathalie Domi pours out glasses of her finest champagne. My wife and I sip and nod approval. It is superb. Flavorful, crisp, and sparkling. We are visiting Champagne Domi Moreau, Nathalie's family company, one of the smallest and most traditional producers in the Champagne region of northeastern France. Many tourists just spend a day in Champagne's main cities, Reims or Epernay. They go to famous champagne houses like Veuve Clicquot and enjoy a tasting.
SPORTS
February 13, 2015 | BY TYLER R. TYNES, For the Daily News
THE ENCHANTING RUN that Philadelphia's Taney Dragons and ace pitcher Mo'ne Davis went through last summer at the Little League World Series in Williamsport may have ended too soon. The Chicago-based Jackie Robinson West club, the first all-black squad to win the United States Little League Championship, was stripped of its title by Little League International yesterday after it was determined the team had falsified boundaries to field ineligible players. Little League International also said that after the boundaries had been changed, JRW officials went to surrounding leagues in Illinois to claim players to build a superior team.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2014
B UZZ: Hey, Marnie, why do wines need to rest before they're ready to drink? Marnie: Most wines are ready to drink immediately, Buzz. Certainly all wines in your favorite bargain category. If it's on the shelf for less than $25, there's no need to age it any further, so drink up. Buzz: No, I mean when you make wine, not when you buy it. My Italian father-in-law makes his own homemade red. I helped him crush grapes in September, so when we visited last weekend I wanted to drink the batch we made.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2014
  B   UZZ: I had enough French in high school to know blanc means white. But grapes, like sauvignon blanc, are green. Shouldn't it be sauvignon vert ? Marnie: That's a good question, Buzz. Green wine grapes likely weren't dubbed "white" because they look white but to emphasize their contrast with purple grapes, which are so dark they look black on the vine. Buzz: So, you're saying winemakers think in black and white? Marnie: I guess they must, since that's how they historically named grape varieties in Europe.
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