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NEWS
February 14, 1987
The subject of grass versus artificial turf has been with us ever since Houston Astros owner Judge Roy Hofheinz spread a plastic rug across the Astrodome back in 1966 because real grass died in the enclosed stadium. The issue has elicited a wide variety of responses. When Tug McGraw, the famous Phillies relief pitcher and savant, was asked whether he preferred grass or Astroturf, he supposedly replied that he didn't know - he'd never smoked Astroturf. In any event, the issue is with us again - or should be - since the city's capital budget for the coming fiscal year includes a tidy $2.1 million for the replacement of the artificial turf at Veterans Stadium.
SPORTS
July 15, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
The Bermuda grass installed on the surface at Giants Stadium for the World Cup went on sale yesterday. The grass is selling for $20 a square foot and there were takers willing to reach into their pockets for a section of it. The first customer showed up at 6 a.m., World Cup grass expert Don Lockerbie said. "It was an Italian gentleman and he had a plane to catch," Lockerbie said. "But he said he had to have a piece of the grass that Roberto Baggio scored goals to get Italy to the World Cup final.
SPORTS
July 1, 1990 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An hour before the first match of the tournament is played, there is no more beautiful sight than Centre Court at the All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club. The grass is fresh and springy. When the clean British breeze kicks up, the smell is of summer, sweet and healthy. This, you think, is the way tennis is supposed to be played. But the first heavy step defending champion Boris Becker takes on Centre Court leaves a heavy impression on the baseline. The second tears up a piece of the carefully groomed turf.
NEWS
August 16, 2005
WATCHING the T.O. workout in front of his home on television Wednesday, I have come to one conclusion. T.O. is definitely underpaid by the Eagles. Just take a good look at the deplorable state of the grass in front of his beautiful home. This poor man is spending all his money to take care of his family, and obviously does not have enough left over to bring in Lawn Doctor. The Eagles should be ashamed. Maybe someone should hold a fund-raiser. Glenn Stankovics Upper Providence
NEWS
October 25, 1986
I recently had the pleasure of visiting Philadelphia for the first time. I picked up the paper and read some letters complaining about the SEPTA trains. Well, if these people rode the New York subways for a week, they would never again complain about the Philadelphia transit system. I rode the PATCO line and the Broad Street line, and I found the trains to be clean, comfortable, quiet and safe. To sum it up, I was very impressed. To the people of Philadelphia: Take a trip to New York, ride the trains and buses, and you'll appreciate SEPTA a lot more.
NEWS
August 30, 2005 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
'SOUTH PHILLY with grass" is our witty local description of New Jersey. Actually, it's a pretty good description of suburbs in general. My variation is that the suburbs are grass farms. The American appetite for grass farming has always amazed me. With only 6 percent of the world's population, we account for 70 percent of the world's small-scale grass farmers. (Note to political hacks searching my columns for errors: I'm making it up!) For 50 years, grass farming has been the single largest difference between cities and suburbs.
SPORTS
May 17, 1991 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The clock is ticking on Philadelphia's World Cup bid. If the city is to host some first-round games in the 1994 soccer tournament, it must prove to World Cup organizers by this fall that grass can be grown over artificial turf. The latest grass-at-the-Vet plan, announced yesterday by the Philadelphia Sports Congress, is to temporarily lay narrow strips of sod - 65,000 square feet worth - over the turf. World Cup USA 1994 has said it will select the eight to 12 World Cup sites from 31 applicants in December, and local organizers need to prove that soccer can be played on temporary grass by then.
LIVING
August 20, 1993 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For decades, a seamless, rolling expanse of green lawn has been the quintessential symbol of American suburban life. In the ideal, the grass is as pure as possible, mowed to an even two inches high, and free of dandelions and other insidious intruders. It speaks of quiet, comfortable economic status. Neighbors who properly guard property values. Properly tamed children. Leave It to Beaver social norms. But grass is under attack. Spreading, impressive lawns are increasingly getting a bad name in environmental circles as a wasteful use of water and land.
SPORTS
April 12, 1996 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The Phillies infielders were out at Busch Stadium early yesterday afternoon, taking grounders on the new grass-and-dirt surface that replaced the artificial turf that had been the surface since 1970. The conversion leaves the National League with five carpets: Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Houston, Montreal. Manager Jim Fregosi predicts none will remain in five years; he didn't say it, but, obviously, that would require the indoor Astros and Expos to relocate. "I don't think there's any question down the line, and it's not going to be too far off, where there will not be an artificial turf left in the league," he said.
SPORTS
September 6, 1988 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Gene Scott of New York City retained the U.S. 50-and-over title, and John Powless of Madison, Wis., kept his 55-and-over crown yesterday in the windup of the week-long National Senior Grass Court Tennis Championships at the Germantown Cricket Club. The two finals were shifted to the grass courts of the Philadelphia Cricket Club after the turf at Germantown Cricket Club was declared unplayable in the wake of Sunday's rain. Scott, a former Davis Cup player and the top seed, scored a 7-6 (7-5)
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prime Healthcare Services Inc. hired Linda J. Grass as chief executive of Lower Bucks Hospital, in Bristol Township, Prime said. Grass stepped down as CEO of Temple University Health System's Jeanes Hospital in March. She had been in that position for 12 years. Peter Adamo, who has been regional CEO for Prime since the for-profit California company entered the Philadelphia market in 2012 with the purchase of Roxborough Memorial Hospital, will retain daily responsibilities for Roxborough and oversee the integration of Suburban General, which Prime is buying in a deal that could close as soon as Oct. 1.  
SPORTS
September 11, 2015 | By the Inquirer Staff
Heart to Heart and Divine Oath head the field for the $200,000 President's Cup, a 11/8-mile grass stakes race Saturday at Parx. Heart to Heart, trained by Brian Lynch and owned by West Point Thoroughbreds and Robert Masiello, has gone wire-to-wire in three Grade III races since last September. He also won the Grade III Oceanport at Monmouth on Aug. 2 Divine Oath, trained by Graham Motion, won the Grade III American Derby last year at Arlington Park. He last raced in the Grade I United Nations at Monmouth Park on July 5, finishing last.
SPORTS
July 24, 2015 | BY GARRETT MILEY, For the Daily News
THE PITCH conditions throughout the CONCACAF Gold Cup have been a hot topic of discussion among players, commentators and fans alike. Games have been played all over the United States on varying field setups. After holding matches in Dallas and Kansas City in MLS grass-field stadiums, play moved to larger-capacity stadiums for the later rounds. Gillette Stadium, for example, is a turf field, which is fine for the New England Patriots and other teams to play football on. While all games in the Gold Cup have technically been played on grass pitches, many stadiums laid grass sod over turf fields when hosting the CONCACAF national teams.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Baltic composers are naturally keen to reclaim the national identity that was so often suppressed under Soviet rule. But that didn't make the ultra-American poetry of Walt Whitman - in its original English language - off-limits for Tuivo Tulev in his major work premiered Sunday by the Crossing choir at its Month of Moderns Festival. Funded for the Crossing by the Estonian Ministry of Culture, Tulev's A child said what is the grass was a triumph of internationalism, never resorting to any false Americana while dramatizing Whitman's words, but creating distinctive musical symbolism with the composer's characteristically complex, high-style harmonies.
NEWS
May 12, 2015
ISSUE | L&I REFORM Into the weeds The Inquirer Editorial Board's complaints about the ineffectiveness of the city Department of Licenses and Inspections seem to be right on target ("L&I hasn't been 'fixed,' " May 7). But L&I is not completely dysfunctional: I want to report that they were right there, on the spot, when a tenant of ours failed to mow the lawn - saving who knows how many lives. |Betty Mock, Bala Cynwyd ISSUE | MUSIC EDUCATION Learned travels As a proud alumnus of the 1950s-era All-City Orchestra under the distinguished leadership of Louis G. Wersen, I was glad to hear the orchestra will go to Europe ("Student orchestra to tour Italy," May 6)
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
BIGGIE SMALLS' "Ready to Die" was playing on the radio of a 1987 Buick somewhere in the woods of Delaware County when N.A. Poe did it for the first time. Chris Goldstein was at a Quaker youth retreat in Cape May when he did it for the first time on the beach. Nearly two decades after both men first smoked pot, they planted the seeds for decriminalizing small amounts of marijuana here in Philadelphia. The buddies found fertile ground in then-Councilman Jim Kenney, and with him on board as their "stallion," the city passed an ordinance decriminalizing up to 30 grams, or about an ounce, of weed.
SPORTS
September 22, 2014 | By John Stuetz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State exploded on the ground for 228 yards against Massachusetts on Saturday - 1 more yard than the Nittany Lions had rushed for through their first three games combined. Gaping holes in the 48-7 blowout victory over the Minutemen offered the Lions' running game an opportunity to put on a show for the Beaver Stadium crowd, which celebrated five Penn State rushing touchdowns alone. The breakout day on the ground, as well as a largely peaceful day for Christian Hackenberg in the pocket, allowed a youthful offensive line to prove something to itself, redshirt freshman Andrew Nelson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
STUDENTS from Philadelphia Futures met up with astronomer/personal hero/host of Fox's "Cosmos" Neil deGrasse Tyson on Friday to ask the famed astrophysicist (and excellent "Daily Show" guest) big questions about the universe. They met at Tyson's office at the Rose Center for Earth and Space in New York City, where he is the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium. Tyson reminded the teens that they were in rare air. "There are 7,000 astrophysicists in the world and 7 billion people in the world," he said.
SPORTS
February 5, 2014 | BY BILL FLEISCHMAN, For the Daily News fleiscb@phillynews.com
WILMINGTON, Del. - Randy Monroe was standing at midcourt, surrounded by his basketball players at a recent practice. "If you're not sweating and panting . . . " he began. Finishing the thought, his players chanted, "You're not working hard enough. " This wasn't a college practice. Monroe, a former outstanding Roman Catholic, Philadelphia U. and Cheyney player, is in his first season as head coach at Brandywine High. Before Brandywine, Monroe was the head coach at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County for eight seasons, and an assistant at La Salle University for five (1988-93)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Metrione can't remember the names of all the ornamental grasses in her Haddonfield garden, but her affection for them makes an unforgettable impression: "I like their lines. They're taller than most plants that I have, and I just love it when the wind blows - they're all bent over - and I like the ethereal ones that are real fluffy. I like the ones that are heavy with seeds, too. Then they bend differently. I just think they give shape and form and a lot of motion to the garden.
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