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Graveyard Shift

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2012
DEAR ABBY : I just read the letter from a fellow frustrated night-shifter, "Working a 40-Hour Week at Age 73. " I have worked 12-hour shifts for many years to accommodate our family life. I thoroughly agree that the rest of the world does not understand! I've had the strangest requests from people because I'm home during the day. My solution has been to turn off our home phone. This year I made a laminated sign for my front door, asking for peace and quiet. It says, "Please do not ring my doorbell.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
It didn't have to play out this way, but this is Philadelphia and, unfortunately, it did. Two men stormed into a North Philadelphia grocery store looking for free money early yesterday. When the clerk behind the register - Egyptian immigrant Mustafa Shaker, 50, a husband and father of two - refused to give them money, one of them shot him with a sawed-off shotgun. Shaker was pronounced dead at the scene. Another store clerk was uninjured. "It was a senseless, vicious killing," Homicide Unit Capt.
NEWS
December 19, 2007 | By Bob Martin
If work is life's best educator, then the mandatory courses for graduation ought to be manual labor, national service, caregiving and volunteer work. I've done all four and agree with the proposition that they are the foundations for good citizenship and human understanding. Now I'd like to add a fifth: Working nonstandard hours, otherwise known as the swing shift (4 p.m. to midnight) and the graveyard shift (midnight to 8 a.m.). Two things bring these work shifts into focus these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1990 | By Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
Not since "Willard" have rats figured as prominently in a horror film as they do in "Graveyard Shift. " They're all over the rafters, burrowed into the bales, even sometimes stuck in the teeth of a big old cotton comber at a recently reactivated New England textile mill. There are so many of the pests, in fact, that management has only two options: peaceful coexistence or all-out war. Since the decrepit operation's foreman, Warwick (Stephen Macht, with an unfortunate goatee and an even sillier, unplaceable accent)
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
MARRIED FOR LIFE Want a long life? Get married. New evidence that married people live longer than singles has emerged from an anaylsis of life-span data from 16 industrialized nations. "Divorced and widowed people in their 20s and 30s have particularly high risks of dying relative to married people of the same age - sometimes by a factor of 10," Princeton University researchers report. Their study, in the journal Demography, indicates that among those who have never married, the highest risk of dying is linked to people who are between their late 20s and early 40s. OSTEOPOROSIS TREATMENT Good news, osteoporosis victims: An experimental drug can reverse the loss of vertebral bone and prevent fractures in older women.
NEWS
May 31, 1986 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 21 million Americans whose jobs entail rotating-shift work are at greater risk of suffering from heart attacks, ulcers, depression, anxiety and sleep disorders than are people who work a 9-to-5 schedule, researchers reported yesterday. The health problems may develop over time from repeated disruptions in the natural rhythms of the human "biological clock," which is intrinsically programmed for sleep at night and wakefulness during the daylight hours, they said. Moreover, because most workers are not at their best at night, industrial accidents are more likely to happen during the "graveyard shift" - such as was the case at Three Mile Island, Bhopal and Chernobyl, they said.
NEWS
October 24, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. John A. Dietterle, 75, retired pastor of St. Stephen's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Feasterville, died Sunday at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown Township, Bucks County. Mr. Dietterle, a tall and slender man, was a native of Danville in Lackawanna County. He graduated from Danville High School and Muhlenberg College in Allentown, where he worked at the Bethlehem Steel Corp. on the graveyard shift - 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. - and attended school all day. He went on to the Lutheran Seminary in Philadelphia and was ordained in 1947.
NEWS
September 1, 1987
It's not that anyone expects the Camden County Sheriff's Department to operate like a Boy Scout troop, but Sheriff William J. Simon seems to be intent on setting a new standard for sleaziness. Mr. Simon's office has found rather blunt ways to undermine the New Jersey civil service system, which was designed to ensure that qualified applicants are awarded government jobs regardless of their financial ties with the local political organization. Many patronage appointees, for example, were brought in as temporary workers on a "provisional" basis in place of applicants who ranked at the top of the civil service list.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Film Festival isn't limited to charming romcoms, foreign art pictures, and earnest documentaries. Cineastes looking for edgier material will find it in PFF's Graveyard Shift, a program of seven genre offerings from around the world, including a Hitchcockian police thriller from South Korea ( A Hard Day ), a Norwegian black comedy ( In Order of Disappearance ), a New Zealand shocker about a creature who lives inside someone's house ( Housebound ), not to mention a couple of homegrown horror flicks.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"Star Search" - the Ed McMahon-hosted, nationally syndicated TV showcase for undiscovered talent - blew through Philadelphia these past three days like Hurricane Mah-velous. Aspiring vocalists auditioned at ultra-hip Sigma Sound, 212 N. 12th St., on Monday and Tuesday; perspiring hoofers hoofed at Joanna's Studio of Dance, 2439 S. Broad St., yesterday afternoon. At Sigma, framed hit records covered with enough gold to fill every cavity in Center City crowd the walls leading into Studio 2, where "Star Search" sets up camp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Film Festival isn't limited to charming romcoms, foreign art pictures, and earnest documentaries. Cineastes looking for edgier material will find it in PFF's Graveyard Shift, a program of seven genre offerings from around the world, including a Hitchcockian police thriller from South Korea ( A Hard Day ), a Norwegian black comedy ( In Order of Disappearance ), a New Zealand shocker about a creature who lives inside someone's house ( Housebound ), not to mention a couple of homegrown horror flicks.
SPORTS
February 17, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Chesmond makes deliveries for a bakery on the overnight shift, so he knows about shortcuts, stop signs, detours, and sudden changes of direction. His basketball career has taken a similar route as that 16-foot box truck that bumps along South Jersey roads at 3 a.m. while the driver dreams about burying another three-point jumper - or maybe about getting a good night's sleep. Tim McDaniels used to work three jobs to help out at home while strangers would ask him why a 21-year-old with Division I talent was playing in a men's league and not for a college team.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2012
DEAR ABBY : I just read the letter from a fellow frustrated night-shifter, "Working a 40-Hour Week at Age 73. " I have worked 12-hour shifts for many years to accommodate our family life. I thoroughly agree that the rest of the world does not understand! I've had the strangest requests from people because I'm home during the day. My solution has been to turn off our home phone. This year I made a laminated sign for my front door, asking for peace and quiet. It says, "Please do not ring my doorbell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Graveyards and all that comes with them: Death, murder, mayhem, ghosts, ghouls, goblins, and all manner of evildoers. Such is the delectable selection offered for the Philadelphia Film Festival's Graveyard Shift, a program of 10 genre films. Screenings include the postapocalyptic song-and-dance pic The FP , a wigged-out cross between The Road Warrior and West Side Story ; the Norwegian thriller Headhunters , about a corporate headhunter turned art thief; and Italian director Panos Cosmatos' sci-fi saga Beyond the Black Rainbow , an homage to the films of Andrei Tarkovsky and Stanley Kubrick.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
It didn't have to play out this way, but this is Philadelphia and, unfortunately, it did. Two men stormed into a North Philadelphia grocery store looking for free money early yesterday. When the clerk behind the register - Egyptian immigrant Mustafa Shaker, 50, a husband and father of two - refused to give them money, one of them shot him with a sawed-off shotgun. Shaker was pronounced dead at the scene. Another store clerk was uninjured. "It was a senseless, vicious killing," Homicide Unit Capt.
NEWS
December 19, 2007 | By Bob Martin
If work is life's best educator, then the mandatory courses for graduation ought to be manual labor, national service, caregiving and volunteer work. I've done all four and agree with the proposition that they are the foundations for good citizenship and human understanding. Now I'd like to add a fifth: Working nonstandard hours, otherwise known as the swing shift (4 p.m. to midnight) and the graveyard shift (midnight to 8 a.m.). Two things bring these work shifts into focus these days.
NEWS
October 25, 2005 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Detective Terrance Anderson is the only Philadelphia police investigator to probe bogus stolen-gun reports - bogus because they cover the fact that the guns are being sold to criminals. Working out of the North Detective Division at Broad Street and Champlost Avenue, Anderson scrutinizes guns that are reported stolen under suspect circumstances. Sometimes a recently purchased firearm suddenly disappears. Sometimes a woman with a criminal boyfriend reports the theft. To help stem the current surge of gun violence, police brass would like to see more detectives doing similar work across the city.
NEWS
May 14, 2004 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gwen Owens described hosting at QVC as the achievement of a career goal: an on-camera job that would bring her back home to Philadelphia from a TV newsroom in Lancaster. That the job at the West Chester-based cable shopping channel was a big jump in pay and ended a 2 1/2-hour daily commute were also pluses - especially for someone with two young daughters. Reality at QVC was far different, Owens told a jury in a federal civil case yesterday. Owens testified that she lasted four years - fired in 1998 - after finding herself and other African American hosts exiled to the 1 to 7 a.m. "graveyard shift" and criticized constantly for not meeting sales expectations.
NEWS
October 24, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. John A. Dietterle, 75, retired pastor of St. Stephen's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Feasterville, died Sunday at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown Township, Bucks County. Mr. Dietterle, a tall and slender man, was a native of Danville in Lackawanna County. He graduated from Danville High School and Muhlenberg College in Allentown, where he worked at the Bethlehem Steel Corp. on the graveyard shift - 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. - and attended school all day. He went on to the Lutheran Seminary in Philadelphia and was ordained in 1947.
SPORTS
June 14, 1996 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
The PGA Tour is littered with guys who make Walter Mitty look like an underachiever. Woody Austin is one of those. At the University of Miami, he was a promising player, but in the fall of 1987 he tore tendons and cartilage in his left knee during the Qualifying School tournament. The injury sidelined him for two years. So he went to work. A part-time job as a teller in a credit union was his primary source of income, and that obviously didn't put much steak on his plate.
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