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Gravity

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NEWS
July 20, 1990 | Inquirer photographs by Rebecca Barger
Bungee-jumping fans call it exciting: Leaping off a high point and dangling by a cord. In Pennypack Park, the high point is a Conrail bridge, and Conrail spokesman David Neurohr calls it "illegal and dangerous. " Ken Clements, who runs the jumps with Ron Fonde, says they are looking for a permanent site, but for now they "are trespassing on Conrail property. " They warn customers, who pay $35 a pop, that if caught, they are all subject to ticketing and fines.
NEWS
August 19, 1994
Republican critics make much of the staggering weight and complexity of the health bill offered by Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell. We weighed it ourselves: It's a hefty 4 pounds 15 ounces. That brings up a question, though: How come the GOP leaders never mentioned the weight and complexity of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which they labored mightily to help President Clinton get passed? It weighs in at a herniating 5 pounds 12 ounces - without the side agreements.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By MARK RANDALL
I can't have lunch even until I finish this because lives are at stake. Stand back! Lawyers have detected dangerous amounts of gravity along the entire path of the zoo's monorail! This results in a condition where a passenger who decides to leave the monorail at a point on the line not connected to a station will undergo a gravity-induced acceleration toward the center of the earth, followed by a rapid deceleration right at the uppermost layer of the earth's crust. Myself, I run around with a pretty bright crowd, many of whom have read about this phenomenon and even experienced it to lesser degrees.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Quiz: The law of gravity says A) Whatever goes up must come down; or B) The study of physics must remain solemn and sedate. If you answered B, you were proven wrong at Cedar Point amusement park's Physics Day. Thousands of high school physics students earned laboratory credits, and in some cases took final exams, by conducting experiments recently at the park. For instance, they buckled themselves into roller coaster seats with accelerometers strapped to their wrists to measure how fast they were going.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
The Gate Reopened Shows: 8 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $28-35. Information: 215-413-1318 or www.livearts-fringe.org A huge, hexagonal, cagelike structure that reached to the ceiling commanded the space inside Pier 9 on Friday night for the premiere of Brian Sanders' The Gate Reopened . Surrounding it was a packed audience. As Sanders' eight muscular performers - six men and two women - emerged, fleetly circling the Gate's base to the wild cheers of the crowd, I couldn't help but see them as gladiators.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With a story that is nothing if not down-to-earth and characters who represent a threat of violence that is entirely physical, Nick Gomez was right to christen his striking directing debut Laws of Gravity. On the rough streets of Brooklyn where petty hustlers Jimmy (Peter Greene) and Jon (Adam Trese) scrape out a living and issue macho challenges to the other small-time crooks, certain rules of etiquette prevail. For example, it is acceptable to beat your wife or girlfriend, but bad form to do so in public.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1996 | By Bing J. Mark, FOR THE INQUIRER
Emotionally satisfying theater can be made with the simplest means. Case in point: Jess Curtis and Stephanie Maher, the creators of the dance-performance work Sex and Gravity, at the Arts Bank, arrived in Philadelphia from San Francisco less than a week ago. They drafted dancers Paule Turner and Laura Peterson, then taught them short speeches and strenuous tumbling sequences. I didn't expect them to contribute much to Sex and Gravity, but I was wrong. The show's texts are simple, too, depending heavily on simple repeated phrases, litanies, and improvised writing.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Tucked inside a Cabbage Patch Kid shoe and suspended by a plastic-bag parachute, Rafiel Williams' egg landed on the grassy patch just outside the front door of Nether Providence Elementary School. It didn't break. It didn't so much as crack. Hillary Turner's egg, wrapped in tissue paper and secured in a plastic margarine cup, also survived the drop from the second-floor window with its shell intact. But a wrapping of toilet paper and Ziploc bag failed to soften the landing of Brian Sakers' egg, which cracked on contact.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
TORONTO - It's one thing to make a science fiction film. It's another to feel like you're living in one. You would think that for Alfonso Cuarón - director of the verite road pic Y Tu Mamá También , the giant Hogwarts installment Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , and the dystopian thriller Children of Men - a nice, simple stranded-in-space saga would be a cakewalk. Or at least a space walk. You would think wrong. "Here's the thing," says the filmmaker, on the couch in a swanky hotel on the morning after the Toronto International Film Festival premiere of his Sandra Bullock / George Clooney survival thriller.
NEWS
January 13, 2003
The speed of gravity is not to be taken lightly. True, it's weird to think that gravity has a speed. Gravity's something that's just there. If we think of it at all, it's more as a condition of our reality, from the moment we swing our feet out of bed to the moment we dive back in at night. Then again, gravity must have a speed. Earth is this gigantic pear-shaped hunk of rock that throws a gravitational lasso around the moon to keep it faithfully orbiting. Gravity is made of waves, which (although invisible to us)
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NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Angela Coloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - The Pennsylvania Supreme Court's chief justice took a swipe Saturday at embattled Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, saying some information made public by her office about a 2009 investigation was covered by state secrecy laws. Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille told reporters that some of the documents in question constituted grand jury material, which would be confidential. Kane, the subject of a grand jury leak inquiry, has acknowledged releasing material but has argued that she did nothing illegal, that she would prevail in the inquiry and win reelection.
SPORTS
November 20, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
THE SUN shone brightly in eastern Pennsylvania yesterday, a dazzling change from the Monday-morning hangover weather: endless clouds and drizzle, brought, perhaps, by the rainmaker passes thrown by Aaron Rodgers. By yesterday the region was well into recovery from post-Packers malaise; buoyed, perhaps, by a thrilling Steelers win in Nashville against the team that visits Philadelphia on Sunday. Yesterday might have been bright, but it was bone-chilling; a fitting circumstance, considering the cold reality that confronts the Eagles as they come down the homestretch.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "THE SIGNAL," tech-savvy college kids on a cross-country road trip take a detour to confront the Internet troll who's been taunting them. This sidetrack leads them to the middle of nowhere, and to a sinister rural shack inhabited by . . . the Blair Witch? Leatherface? I'd say that you're guess is as good as mine, but it's not, since I've seen "The Signal," and I know what awaits these kids. But I can't tell you, can't even hint at it, because the movie's shift in direction is so radical, its surprises deserve to be preserved.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
T ESS GERRITSEN , the author of the Rizzoli & Isles book series, as well as a number of best-selling suspense novels, filed suit against Warner Bros. on Tuesday, reports TheWrap.com, claiming that the studio based its hit film "Gravity" on her novel. Her book was also called "Gravity" and Warner's New Line subsidiary bought the rights to it in 1999. Gerritsen is seeking 2.5 percent of the film's net profit, according to the New York Times . The author claims that her agreement with Warner promised her a "based upon" credit, if the movie were produced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* BELIEVE. 10 tonight, NBC10. Moves to 9 p.m. Sundays next week.   TV DIRECTORS sometimes complain that they don't get the recognition - or clout - of their big-screen counterparts. That shouldn't be a problem for Alfonso Cuaron, the Oscar-winning director of "Gravity," whose new TV show, "Believe," premieres tonight on NBC following "The Voice" (after which, yes, "The Blacklist" will return to Mondays and "Believe" moves to Sundays). Because curiosity about what he'd do for a TV show may draw even viewers who weren't already watching "The Voice" (or tuning in expecting to see James Spader)
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
12 Years a Slave , the tough, true tale of a free black man abducted and sold into slavery in the 1840s South and a film that fearlessly explores the horrors of what has been termed America's Holocaust, won three Oscars, including the ultimate prize, best picture, at the 86th Academy Awards ceremony Sunday night. But it was Alfonso Cuarón's Gravity , the five-years-in-the-making 3D space saga starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney as astronauts helplessly ricocheting around in Earth's orbit, that landed the most Oscars of the night - seven - sweeping the technical awards and claiming the director, cinematography, editing and original score prizes, too. Cuarón won his first Oscar in the editing department (with co-editor Mark Sanger)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Gravity' heads skyward Alfonso Cuaron was awarded the top film honor from the Directors Guild of America for Gravity Saturday night, giving the lost-in-space saga an edge on the journey to the Oscars. In the recent bustle of Hollywood honors, Gravity , David O. Russell 's con-artist caper American Hustle , and Steve McQueen 's historical epic 12 Years a Slave had been competing in the tightest three-way Oscar race in years. But Cuaron's film now has the upper hand, and with 10 Oscar nominations, is likely to be the biggest overall winner on March 2. American Hustle also has 10 nominations, but in tougher, more competitive races than Gravity 's mainly craft nods.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Two very different American stories - American Hustle , about con artists, greedy pols and an FBI sting, and 12 Years a Slave , about a free black man abducted and sold into slavery - were among the big winners as nominees for the 86th Academy Awards were announced this morning in Beverly Hills. Leading the pack with 10 nominations apiece were David O. Russell's freewheeling take on the polyester-era Abscam scandal, American Hustle , and Alfonso Cuaron's stranded-in-space suspenser, Gravity . 12 Years a Slave , a searing slice of pre-Civil War history, received nine Oscar nods.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THIS YEAR'S Oscar nominations point to a three-way best picture race among "American Hustle," "Gravity" and "12 Years A Slave," and I'd call it a toss-up. "Hustle" and "Gravity" have 10 nominations apiece, and "12 Years" is just behind with nine, so each front-runner has widespread support among the voting base. Handicappers have established "12 Years" as an early 2-to-5 favorite over "Hustle" (4-to-1) and "Gravity" (12-to-1), but these are the same oddsmakers who a few weeks ago thought "Saving Mr. Banks" was an Oscar favorite.
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