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FOOD
August 21, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
The iconic foodstuffs of the Delaware Valley are many. The roast pork sandwich has rightfully become a point of pride, recognized in publications local and national. And we can't seem to shake our notoriety for the cheesesteak, even though our local food scene has evolved so far beyond this humble sandwich. There is, however, one summertime staple that is pure Philly, deserves elite culinary status, and is largely unsung. My grandmother made it, and yours might have, too. If you have Italian heritage, a Jersey Shore tradition, and someone who likes to cook in your family, it may well be on this weekend's meal plan.
FOOD
May 7, 1997 | by Robert Strauss For the Daily News
Though it is no doubt heresy Downtown in South Philadelphia, there is a clear move at the supermarket toward the marketing of "homemade-style" spaghetti sauces, most often distinguished by their Ball-jar like bottles. (You can tell it is heresy, of course, because those bottled concoctions are referred to as "sauce" and not the true appellation, "gravy. ") Nonetheless, it is only fair to try to give the glassed-in reds their due. So the Daily News gathered a panel of worthy judges with good Italian eating roots to dive into a half-dozen of the new bottled entries.
FOOD
December 23, 2004 | By Michael Martin Mills INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We were tooling along one of Phoenix's endless multi-lane quasi-highways a few years ago when the heresy was committed. The woman who would be my sister-in-law if all the familial connections involved marriage licenses was running down the list of things to do and items to buy in preparation for Christmas dinner. One of them - and her inflection indicated it was not a minor consideration - was to pick up gravy at the supermarket. Oh dear, I thought, trying earnestly - politely - not to betray my feelings.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphians may set records in buying prepared pasta sauce, but homemade also ranks high here. Hairdresser Nicole Bologna, 23, of South Philadelphia, says she not only makes her own gravy, she's "never even tasted jarred sauce. " (Vocabulary note: In South Philadelphia, if it comes in a jar, it's called sauce. If it's homemade, it's called gravy.) When Mariella Esposito, owner of Fante's cookware shop on 9th Street, was asked if she could name some customers who buy pasta sauce, she exclaimed: "In South Philadelphia?
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A diet rich in tomato sauce . . . and other tomato-based products . . . can lower the risk of prostate cancer, a new study says. - Associated Press Red gravy is concentrated, molten Italian-ness, a soulful symbol of family, identity, memory and mom. It's not fancy. In fact, tangy, spicy, satisfying tomato sauce - it's gravy here in the East, sauce nearly everywhere else - is dismissed as common and unsophisticated, especially as restaurant fare. But to Italian Americans, there's mojo in the boiling pot. "I think it is at the heart of what it means to be Italian in America," said food anthropologist Paola Sensi-Isolani of St. Mary's College of California in Moraga.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1993 | By Deborah Scoblionkov, FOR THE INQUIRER
In Italian South Philly, two things rule: the heart and the stomach. Which is to say that the most important things in life are the family and food. As soon as the first Italian immigrants settled in South Philly (or "downtown," as locals call it), trattorias appeared, clustered primarily around the main intestinal tracts of Ninth Street and Passyunk Avenue. The exotic, ethnic food - gutsy, saucy, garlicky and, best of all, affordable - attracted adventurous eaters from all parts of the city - except South Philly.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | By Art Caplan
St. Elizabeths Hospital is a sprawling facility for the mentally ill located almost in the shadow of Capitol Hill. It took in its first patient in 1855. Founded by Dorothea Dix, social reformer and mental health pioneer, the institution adhered to a view that was novel for its day and is sadly, if one takes Gingrich seriously, novel in ours. Dix argued that if we treat the mentally ill kindly and with dignity, some might recover. Gingrich ought take a few minutes out from hobnobbing with publishing magnates and $5,000-a-plate dinners and drop in on the young patients at St. Elizabeths.
FOOD
November 19, 2009
Casseroles travel safely to Thanksgiving dinner in this two-quart covered dish. Fits neatly into a woven wood basket, and the pair would make a nice gift to leave with the host.   For the gravy This lovely porcelain gravy boat is bordered with a garland of oak leaves, acorns and pumpkins - perfect for the annual autumnal feast. It holds 11 ounces of gravy, and it's microwavable and dishwasher safe.  
FOOD
January 2, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: Thermal syrup/gravy server Manufacturer: Progressive International Corp., Kent, Wash. Where: Kitchen Kapers Price: $9.99 Purpose: Keeps gravy, sauce or syrup warm during meals. The gravy boat that matches your china pattern may look pretty on the table, but it won't keep gravy warm during a long meal. Progressive International's lightweight plastic gravy pitcher has a Thermos-like, stainless-steel interior; a two-cup capacity; and a cap that screws on tightly so that gravy will stay hot even during a marathon dinner.
NEWS
November 26, 2008
Last week's Inquirer Food section offered suggestions on wines for Thanksgiving and recipes for citrus roasted turkey, stuffed turkey breast, glazed brussels sprouts and pan gravy. Plus, read Craig LaBan's recipe for "The Incredible Barbecued Bird. " Go to and click on the Restaurants & Food link.
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FOOD
August 21, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
The iconic foodstuffs of the Delaware Valley are many. The roast pork sandwich has rightfully become a point of pride, recognized in publications local and national. And we can't seem to shake our notoriety for the cheesesteak, even though our local food scene has evolved so far beyond this humble sandwich. There is, however, one summertime staple that is pure Philly, deserves elite culinary status, and is largely unsung. My grandmother made it, and yours might have, too. If you have Italian heritage, a Jersey Shore tradition, and someone who likes to cook in your family, it may well be on this weekend's meal plan.
NEWS
August 7, 2015
DENISE FIKE'S MEATBALLS Serves 6-8 1/2 c. extra virgin olive oil (or more as needed) 4 Tbsp. butter (or more as needed) 1 large onion, chopped 3 carrots, minced 2 stalks celery, minced 3 cloves garlic minced 1/8 cup Gravy Master 1/4 cup soy sauce 5 dashes Angostura bitters 1 lb. ground veal 1 lb. ground sirloin 1 lb. ground pork 2 eggs 1 bunch parsley, stemmed and minced 1/2 cup Parmigiano...
NEWS
March 3, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's true that you didn't have to come from South Philadelphia or be an ethnic Italian to win Sunday's first-ever Red Gravy Cook-off, sponsored by the East Passyunk Crossing Civic Association. But there's no doubt those qualities helped give contestants an edge. South Philadelphia Italians were making and enjoying red gravy well before anyone came up with the name "East Passyunk Crossing" for the neighborhood around 10th and Morris. So, even if they do occasionally spike their gravies with a secret ingredient or two, they hold firm to the belief that "red gravy has to taste a certain way," explained Mark Squilla, the local councilman and South Philadelphia native who served as one of the competition judges.
FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Townsend "Tod" Wentz was growing up in Palmyra, Burlington County, his family's Thanksgiving table varied depending on who was cooking dinner. When his German-English relatives hosted, the holiday meant turkey, gravy, green beans, and stuffing. But when his Polish grandmother was in charge, it was a feast of ham, stuffed cabbage, and coleslaw. Now that Wentz is the one doing the cooking, he does the only logical thing: He makes all of the above. Only he refines the dishes with the classical French techniques that have become the hallmark of his six-month-old restaurant, Townsend, on East Passyunk Avenue's booming restaurant corridor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — It's easy to make fun of the Palins' penchant for playing themselves on television — I've done it often enough myself. But while it was a little odd to have a former vice presidential candidate at a poolside party at the Beverly Hilton last week to promote her husband's appearance on an upcoming NBC "reality" competition, "Stars Earn Stripes," and only a few days later, at the same hotel, have ABC introduce her oldest daughter to the Television Critics Association as one of the returning "all-star" competitors on "Dancing With the Stars," we're in an odd time, and in an odd place.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
Talk about hot tomatoes. A tractor-trailer carrying a load of tomatoes caught fire late Wednesday in the northbound lanes of I-295 in Gloucester County. No injuries were reported in the blaze south of Exit 17 in Greenwich Township, but the fire created a gooey mess that took workers a good part of the night to clean up, disrupting traffic flow through the area until just before dawn. The cause is under investigation.
FOOD
March 17, 2011
A proper red-eye gravy gets its bold richness in part from a dose of strong black coffee. Shawn Sollberger, chef and co-owner of the new Northern Liberties pub Gunners Run, combines his grandfather's technique for chicken-fried steak with his North Carolina neighbor's red-eye gravy recipe. Instead of adding ham to the gravy, as is the norm, Sollberger crumbles bacon into the oil he uses to pan-fry the top round steak. He deglazes the pan with coffee. It's served with sauteed spinach and black-eyed peas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
With a name like West Side Gravy, you might be looking for the Sharks and Jets. Instead, look to Gordon Ramsay's "Hell's Kitchen" and season seven contestant Siobhan Allgood. Allgood first came to my attention when she turned out fantastic fish tacos at McKenna's bar in Fairmount. I was saddened to learn the tacos had packed up and gone to "Hell's Kitchen. " Now they are back in a new location. West Side Gravy is the second venture for Alex Capasso of Blackbird in Collingswood, N.J. In September, he put Allgood in charge of this kitchen, which turns out casual meals grounded in comfort food.
FOOD
September 16, 2010
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat:        Reader: I checked out Capasso's West Side Gravy and the place was deserted except for the lonely greeter. What's going on with that restaurant? C.L.: West Side Gravy was deserted the last time I passed by - on a Friday night - which isn't a good sign. Alex Capasso is an excellent chef, and I've yet to try his comfort food updates here. They may be outstanding. But there's something a bit cavernous and stark about this converted Woolworth's space that seems to be uninviting.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
By Ralph Cipriano Philadelphia officials would rather risk our lives and raise our taxes than kill DROP. The Deferred Retirement Option Plan is the program that pays city employees six-figure cash bonuses when they retire - on top of their regular salaries, pensions, and five years of free health insurance. Rather than get rid of it, city officials have raised property taxes 10 percent and passed budget cuts that will shut down firehouses, whack millions of dollars in police overtime, and shelve plans to hire 200 new cops.
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