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Gray Wolf

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NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Matthew Brown and John Flesher, Associated Press
BILLINGS, Mont. - Federal wildlife officials have drafted plans to lift protections for gray wolves across the Lower 48 states, a move that could end a decades-long recovery effort that has restored the animals but only in parts of their historic range. The draft U.S. Department of Interior rule obtained by the Associated Press contends the roughly 6,000 wolves now living in the Northern Rockies and Great Lakes are enough to prevent the species' extinction. The agency says having gray wolves elsewhere - such as the West Coast, parts of New England, and elsewhere in the Rockies - is unnecessary for their long-term survival.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Lenny Bernstein, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The federal government moved Friday to end endangered species protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, contending the population of the apex predator has recovered from decades of hunting that drove it to virtual extinction. The Fish and Wildlife Service formally proposed removing the gray wolf from the list of threatened and endangered species, noting that 6,100 wolves roam the contiguous United States, just about all of them in the northern Rocky Mountains and western Great Lakes areas.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The thrilling adventure of OR-7 has captivated the West Coast and Northwest. It's a saga of courage and the enduring resilience of the wild. It's also a saga that will never happen in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. OR-7 is the gray wolf who left his pack in northwest Oregon and trekked more than 1,000 miles into Stanislaus County, Calif. The first gray wolf in the state since 1924, he has become so famous they had a contest to name him. The winning name, chosen by two separate kids: Journey.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRESNO, CALIF. - He doesn't like busy Interstate 5 or eating cattle, at least so far. He gets along with his distant cousins the coyotes, likes to swim and roams a lot - an awful lot - around the northernmost reaches of the Golden State. A week or so ago, California's lone gray wolf passed his first anniversary as a transplant resident with the same technical accoutrements some people possess: a Twitter account and an online site about his travels. "What strikes me about him is that when I talk to the general public they show remarkable knowledge about his movements, much more than some world events," said Richard Callas, a senior environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
NEWS
September 1, 2005 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the eighth anniversary of Princess Diana's death yesterday, fans and loyalists congregated outside her former home to honor her. The crowd at Kensington Palace was small compared with years past, according to the Associated Press. Nevertheless, people wept, deposited flowers, and bad-mouthed the woman who wound up marrying Prince Charles, who had divorced Diana. "She [Diana] is our queen of hearts. You never forget your queen of hearts," said delivery driver Raymond Nurse, 44. "Camilla [Parker Bowles]
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this corner of northwestern Minnesota, deep in the vast wilderness of the Superior National Forest and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, the gray wolf has ruled the wild longer than anyone can remember. "You can see them sometimes crossing roads," said Lori Schmidt, a naturalist who works with wolves at Ely's International Wolf Center. "At night, you can often hear them howling. " On the federal endangered-species list since 1967, the wolf is, with the government's help, making inroads in other areas of the country, including the neighboring states of Wisconsin and Michigan.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | By Carl M. Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In an office at the Interior Department hangs a framed lithograph of a mother wolf and three pups perched on a boulder in Yellowstone National Park. The peaceful family scene shows the mother and cuddly pups howling at a new moon. "Beautiful, isn't it?" marvels park service spokesman George Berklacy. On the opposite wall of Berklacy's office is a much different piece of art - an oil painting of a wolf pack on the prowl. While the painting is dominated by dark greens and browns, it is the bright, glowing eyes of the wolves that attract attention.
NEWS
May 6, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
ON THIN ICE, FLOATING MOOSE BECOMES A FLYING MOOSE A young moose was a little bruised and woozy but otherwise OK after a helicopter lift yesterday off a sheet of drifting ice in Conception Bay. The yearling was chased onto the ice by dogs Thursday night. A small floe then broke away and drifted about 150 yards off the shore of the community of Kelligrews near St. John's, Newfoundland. Wildlife officials tranquilized the 400-pound animal, put a harness on it, and lifted it to a wooded area, where it was released.
NEWS
January 25, 1998 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Mexican gray wolf returns to Arizona's Apache National Forest tomorrow. The choreographed fanfare accompanying the event befits the reintroduction into the wild of a species that was one female away from being extinct just 20 years ago. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt will be there. So will descendants of Aldo Leopold, cofounder of the Wilderness Society. The national wildlife-preservation group Defenders of Wildlife is throwing a party to highlight the event. But nobody's celebrating here in southwestern Montana, abutting Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park, where wolves were brought back in a similar program three years ago. Not the environmentalists, stunned by a federal court ruling last month that the Yellowstone wolves must be removed.
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NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Lenny Bernstein, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The federal government moved Friday to end endangered species protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, contending the population of the apex predator has recovered from decades of hunting that drove it to virtual extinction. The Fish and Wildlife Service formally proposed removing the gray wolf from the list of threatened and endangered species, noting that 6,100 wolves roam the contiguous United States, just about all of them in the northern Rocky Mountains and western Great Lakes areas.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Matthew Brown and John Flesher, Associated Press
BILLINGS, Mont. - Federal wildlife officials have drafted plans to lift protections for gray wolves across the Lower 48 states, a move that could end a decades-long recovery effort that has restored the animals but only in parts of their historic range. The draft U.S. Department of Interior rule obtained by the Associated Press contends the roughly 6,000 wolves now living in the Northern Rockies and Great Lakes are enough to prevent the species' extinction. The agency says having gray wolves elsewhere - such as the West Coast, parts of New England, and elsewhere in the Rockies - is unnecessary for their long-term survival.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRESNO, CALIF. - He doesn't like busy Interstate 5 or eating cattle, at least so far. He gets along with his distant cousins the coyotes, likes to swim and roams a lot - an awful lot - around the northernmost reaches of the Golden State. A week or so ago, California's lone gray wolf passed his first anniversary as a transplant resident with the same technical accoutrements some people possess: a Twitter account and an online site about his travels. "What strikes me about him is that when I talk to the general public they show remarkable knowledge about his movements, much more than some world events," said Richard Callas, a senior environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Todd Richmond and Steve Karnowski, Associated Press
MADISON, Wis. - For years, vacationers and farmers across northern Wisconsin and Minnesota have heard the eerie howl of the gray wolf and fretted the creatures were lurking around their cabins and pastures, eying up Fido or Bessie. The tables are about to turn: Both states plan to launch their first organized wolf hunts in the coming weeks. The hunts won't be anything on the scale of the two states' beloved whitetail deer hunts, when hundreds of thousands of hunters rearrange work and school schedules and fan out across the woods.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The thrilling adventure of OR-7 has captivated the West Coast and Northwest. It's a saga of courage and the enduring resilience of the wild. It's also a saga that will never happen in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. OR-7 is the gray wolf who left his pack in northwest Oregon and trekked more than 1,000 miles into Stanislaus County, Calif. The first gray wolf in the state since 1924, he has become so famous they had a contest to name him. The winning name, chosen by two separate kids: Journey.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011
TEEN WOLF. 11 p.m. Sunday, MTV. Moves to 10 p.m. Mondays the following night. THE FIRST SIGN that MTV's newest scripted show is, as programming chief David Janollari puts it, "not your father's 'Teen Wolf' " is probably the brief sight of half a dead girl - the top half - illuminated by what looks to be the flashlight app from an iPhone. Michael J. Fox never even got to text, much less stumble over dismembered bodies in the woods. But compared to MTV's controversial remake of the British adolescent drama "Skins," its new "Teen Wolf," which premieres Sunday after "The 2011 MTV Movie Awards," is practically housebroken.
NEWS
September 20, 2009 | By Pam Mitchell FOR THE INQUIRER
Sometimes in life, you need to take an action that makes a statement, not for the rest of the world, but just for yourself. That's what I did in the fall of 2007, when I journeyed to Yellowstone to visit the wolves. September is a crucial time for teachers, and, having retired after 37 years of teaching, I knew I would be feeling the pull of the classroom when autumn arrived. So I decided instead to spend my September days in one of America's most stunning settings, Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.
NEWS
November 11, 2006 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
It was 1970 and Tony Baratta was a junior at Pennsauken High School when his four brothers dragged him out on a hunting excursion. They had been hanging out, eating hoagies, when the whim struck them, and they forced him to come along. He had never shot anything, had never been enthusiastic to shoot anything. That day, though, he bagged a pheasant and his brothers decided they should get it stuffed. "I went to the taxidermist and I was just fascinated about how he made it look so real," said Baratta.
NEWS
September 1, 2005 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the eighth anniversary of Princess Diana's death yesterday, fans and loyalists congregated outside her former home to honor her. The crowd at Kensington Palace was small compared with years past, according to the Associated Press. Nevertheless, people wept, deposited flowers, and bad-mouthed the woman who wound up marrying Prince Charles, who had divorced Diana. "She [Diana] is our queen of hearts. You never forget your queen of hearts," said delivery driver Raymond Nurse, 44. "Camilla [Parker Bowles]
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