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Gray Wolves

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NEWS
February 26, 1994 | By DEROY MURDOCK
Striking a blow for common sense in wildlife protection, a federal judge removed the Bruneau Hot Springs snail from the federal Endangered Species List last December. The pencil-point-sized snail was the first creature ever booted from the list through court action. The judge criticized federal authorities for not allowing public scrutiny of the scientific data which earned the snail protected status. Hundreds of farm workers in Idaho's Bruneau Valley, whose jobs the snail endangered, now sleep more soundly at night.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The thrilling adventure of OR-7 has captivated the West Coast and Northwest. It's a saga of courage and the enduring resilience of the wild. It's also a saga that will never happen in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. OR-7 is the gray wolf who left his pack in northwest Oregon and trekked more than 1,000 miles into Stanislaus County, Calif. The first gray wolf in the state since 1924, he has become so famous they had a contest to name him. The winning name, chosen by two separate kids: Journey.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Lenny Bernstein, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The federal government moved Friday to end endangered species protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, contending the population of the apex predator has recovered from decades of hunting that drove it to virtual extinction. The Fish and Wildlife Service formally proposed removing the gray wolf from the list of threatened and endangered species, noting that 6,100 wolves roam the contiguous United States, just about all of them in the northern Rocky Mountains and western Great Lakes areas.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Michael Silverstein
A few years ago, several dozen gray wolves were reintroduced in Yellowstone National Park. It was part of an Interior Department effort to keep down excess deer and elk populations, and to restore a natural predator to a habitat where it once roamed free. In a larger sense, it was also a recognition that the "natural" approach to public-land management - the way it was done before elaborate human planning became the rule - often remains the best way to get things done. The question that leaps to mind is whether a similar effort might work well in the parklands of major American cities - more specifically, whether the introduction of gray wolves into Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, or Central Park in New York might have a salutary effect on the local ecologies.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Matthew Brown and John Flesher, Associated Press
BILLINGS, Mont. - Federal wildlife officials have drafted plans to lift protections for gray wolves across the Lower 48 states, a move that could end a decades-long recovery effort that has restored the animals but only in parts of their historic range. The draft U.S. Department of Interior rule obtained by the Associated Press contends the roughly 6,000 wolves now living in the Northern Rockies and Great Lakes are enough to prevent the species' extinction. The agency says having gray wolves elsewhere - such as the West Coast, parts of New England, and elsewhere in the Rockies - is unnecessary for their long-term survival.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
U.S.: Retaliation in 'Fast-Furious' WASHINGTON - The U.S. attorney in Arizona violated Justice Department policy by providing Fox News with information apparently aimed at undercutting the credibility of a federal agent who helped reveal the botched arms-trafficking probe called "Operation Fast and Furious," the Justice Department's inspector general said Monday. There was substantial evidence in the 2011 incident that then-U.S. Attorney Dennis Burke's motive for disclosing a memo by federal agent John Dodson was retaliation, the inspector general's report said.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By John Flesher and Steve Karnowski, Associated Press
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. - John Koski is itching to pick up his rifle after losing dozens of cows to wolves on his farm in Michigan's Upper Peninsula - and he'll soon get his chance. A legal shield that has protected gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region for nearly four decades will end Friday, when the animal is taken off the federal endangered species list. With that milestone, a primal struggle that was waged in this rugged backcountry for more than a century will resume, although in a more restrained fashion.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the fourth consecutive year, the effort to reauthorize the federal Endangered Species Act - a law designed to protect plants and animals threatened with extinction - has run into serious opposition in Congress. The reauthorization bill, which would increase funding and strengthen the law, was passed by the House in December. But in the Senate, where the bill is now before a committee, there is opposition that focuses on efforts made in the bill to preserve a fish, a bear, a wolf and a turtle.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Asked to name the bad guy in the classic Little Red Riding Hood, most elementary school students would probably say the wolf. Not so the students of Coopertown Elementary School teacher Karen Penn. Her students, she said, have learned that the wolf is a misunderstood victim and Red, as she's known to her friends, is a liar. "I teach fairy tales in second grade - Peter and the Wolf, Little Red Riding Hood and The Wolf and the Seven Kids - as part of language arts. I feel they also need to know what real wolves are like," Penn said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Lenny Bernstein, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The federal government moved Friday to end endangered species protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, contending the population of the apex predator has recovered from decades of hunting that drove it to virtual extinction. The Fish and Wildlife Service formally proposed removing the gray wolf from the list of threatened and endangered species, noting that 6,100 wolves roam the contiguous United States, just about all of them in the northern Rocky Mountains and western Great Lakes areas.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
U.S.: Retaliation in 'Fast-Furious' WASHINGTON - The U.S. attorney in Arizona violated Justice Department policy by providing Fox News with information apparently aimed at undercutting the credibility of a federal agent who helped reveal the botched arms-trafficking probe called "Operation Fast and Furious," the Justice Department's inspector general said Monday. There was substantial evidence in the 2011 incident that then-U.S. Attorney Dennis Burke's motive for disclosing a memo by federal agent John Dodson was retaliation, the inspector general's report said.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Matthew Brown and John Flesher, Associated Press
BILLINGS, Mont. - Federal wildlife officials have drafted plans to lift protections for gray wolves across the Lower 48 states, a move that could end a decades-long recovery effort that has restored the animals but only in parts of their historic range. The draft U.S. Department of Interior rule obtained by the Associated Press contends the roughly 6,000 wolves now living in the Northern Rockies and Great Lakes are enough to prevent the species' extinction. The agency says having gray wolves elsewhere - such as the West Coast, parts of New England, and elsewhere in the Rockies - is unnecessary for their long-term survival.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
LITITZ, Pa. - Levi, the hybrid wolf-dog who eluded capture in Pennypack Park from March until 3:30 a.m. Tuesday, is not seeing any visitors these days. That's the word from Speedwell Forge Wolf Sanctuary, where Levi lives in quarantine in a 10-by-10-foot enclosure. The gray wolf-Malamute can hear the barks, growls, and howls from the 44 other gray wolves and hybrids on the place, a private, nonprofit sanctuary licensed by the Pennsylvania Game Commission. If he were suddenly thrown in with one of the packs of wolves that roam 22 acres of securely fenced Lancaster County land, he'd be torn to pieces in two minutes.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The thrilling adventure of OR-7 has captivated the West Coast and Northwest. It's a saga of courage and the enduring resilience of the wild. It's also a saga that will never happen in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. OR-7 is the gray wolf who left his pack in northwest Oregon and trekked more than 1,000 miles into Stanislaus County, Calif. The first gray wolf in the state since 1924, he has become so famous they had a contest to name him. The winning name, chosen by two separate kids: Journey.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By John Flesher and Steve Karnowski, Associated Press
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. - John Koski is itching to pick up his rifle after losing dozens of cows to wolves on his farm in Michigan's Upper Peninsula - and he'll soon get his chance. A legal shield that has protected gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region for nearly four decades will end Friday, when the animal is taken off the federal endangered species list. With that milestone, a primal struggle that was waged in this rugged backcountry for more than a century will resume, although in a more restrained fashion.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Matthew Brown, Associated Press
BILLINGS, Mont. - The Obama administration is taking steps to extend new federal protections to a list of imperiled animals and plants that reads like a manifest for Noah's Ark - from the melodic golden-winged warbler and slow-moving gopher tortoise, to the slimy American eel and tiny Texas kangaroo rat. Compelled by a pair of recent legal settlements, the effort in part targets species that have been mired in bureaucratic limbo even as they inch...
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Michael Silverstein
A few years ago, several dozen gray wolves were reintroduced in Yellowstone National Park. It was part of an Interior Department effort to keep down excess deer and elk populations, and to restore a natural predator to a habitat where it once roamed free. In a larger sense, it was also a recognition that the "natural" approach to public-land management - the way it was done before elaborate human planning became the rule - often remains the best way to get things done. The question that leaps to mind is whether a similar effort might work well in the parklands of major American cities - more specifically, whether the introduction of gray wolves into Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, or Central Park in New York might have a salutary effect on the local ecologies.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Asked to name the bad guy in the classic Little Red Riding Hood, most elementary school students would probably say the wolf. Not so the students of Coopertown Elementary School teacher Karen Penn. Her students, she said, have learned that the wolf is a misunderstood victim and Red, as she's known to her friends, is a liar. "I teach fairy tales in second grade - Peter and the Wolf, Little Red Riding Hood and The Wolf and the Seven Kids - as part of language arts. I feel they also need to know what real wolves are like," Penn said.
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