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Grays Ferry

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NEWS
October 3, 1997 | GEORGE REYNOLDS/ DAILY NEWS
Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua (above, center) talks with residents of Grays Ferry after prayer service (below) at St. Gabriel's Catholic Church in which about 500 people of different races came to promote peace.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The saga of Grays Ferry continues. Catholic and Protestant clergy are holding an ecumenical prayer service and procession of hope in Grays Ferry tonight to encourage healing in the racially charged neighborhood. Community groups are coming up with proposals to ease tensions between black and white residents of the South Philadelphia community. A march through Grays Ferry to protest racial violence, called by the Nation of Islam, is set for April 14. Meanwhile, the city is being close-mouthed about its behind-the-scenes efforts to ease racial tensions in the community.
NEWS
February 6, 2003 | By ANDREW HOHNS
GRAYS FERRY gets a bad rap for community relations. It is commonly held that people just don't get along here, don't ever help one another across racial and social lines. The truth is that it is not so much black against white as it is those who care and want to fight for the neighborhood versus those who are indifferent to its fate - and by their indifference, contribute to the speed of its decline. Walk down the streets here, spend time getting to know the people, and you quickly realize that a war is being waged for this community's survival, a war whose stakes are impossibly high and whose outcome is all but certain.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | By Darrell Dawsey, Clea Benson and Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Police arrested a third suspect yesterday in an attack on a black family by a group of white men in Grays Ferry that has stirred racial tension in the neighborhood. City Council President John F. Street, meanwhile, reiterated his appeal to the Nation of Islam and other groups not to stage protest marches through the community. "We hope we can avoid the risk that something terrible could happen down in Grays Ferry and forever scar the reputation of the people who live there and all over this city," Street said in an interview.
NEWS
September 11, 1997
Some people in Grays Ferry believe the neighborhood's racial troubles would go away if Annette Williams would just move out. Her family - particularly her 18-year-old son and 17-year-old nephew - have been at the center of several confrontations in the neighborhood, including last spring's meltdown that created a dangerous uproar, prompting an invitation to Louis Farrakhan. But despite some prodding from her lawyer and offers of help from Mayor Rendell, the 34-year-old African-American hotel worker has decided to stay in Grays Ferry.
NEWS
March 18, 1997
The situation in Grays Ferry is tragic, sad, ugly and dangerous. Young Christopher Brinkman, only 16 years old, is dead. And in the South Philadelphia neighborhood in which so many see their problems in terms of race, too many whites blame his death on blacks - instead of armed robbers. And Annette Williams, her son and nephew, who are black, are recovering - especially emotionally - from a Feb. 23 attack by a large group of white men who were leaving a party in a church (!
NEWS
August 15, 1997
People of Grays Ferry: Is this really the way you want to live? It's a working-class neighborhood of tight rowhouses and, increasingly it seems, tight nerves. For economic and social reasons, you can't leave. This is home. And will be for a long time. For black and white, those are the facts. You can't change where you live. But you can change how you're living. If not, the Philadelphia Police Department will have to become an occupying force, newspapers and TV stations will have to open bureaus in the neighborhood to keep up with what's happening, and you'll be treated to the kind of scrutiny reserved for Bosnia and the Middle East.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
"This is Grays Ferry. " That's how the prosecutor and defense lawyers in the trial of nine white men accused of beating a black family summed up the neighborhood. As the trial ended yesterday, a year of neighborhood conflict, racial divisiveness and intense media scrutiny boiled down to this: Was it a neighborhood brawl or a unified attack by angry whites against a black family because of their race? During passionate closing arguments yesterday, Assistant District Attorney Jan McDermott argued that the defendants hit and threatened to kill the family, trashed the front of their home, then threatened to blow it up. "This is a case of racial bias," she told Judge Albert J. Snite Jr. But defense lawyers argued yesterday and Thursday that the brawl had been merely a street fight that spiraled out of control.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank X. "Monk" Markey, a truck driver and strong union supporter who engendered the spirit of Grays Ferry pride, died yesterday. He was 49 and lived in the Grays Ferry section of South Philadelphia. "He was a corner guy who loved the neighborhood and hated the oil refineries. He was such a strong union man that, believe it or not, he wouldn't even go through the exact-change lanes on the bridge," said his brother, Joe "The Lord of Tasker" Markey. "He'd sit in a traffic jam (at the toll booth)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doris Polsky, 90, a precocious mathematician who helped integrate Mount Airy, died Wednesday, June 3, in her home at Cresheimbrook Condominium. Along with her twin sister, she was recruited out of the Philadelphia High School for Girls to work on Army ballistics research during World War II. Together, they also helped found the Allens Lane Art Center and West Mount Airy Neighbors. As owners of Twin Realty, they helped stanch white flight in Northwest Philadelphia during the 1960s, thwarting banks' redlining practices and selling to people of all colors, creeds, and sexual orientations.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tyrique Glasgow stood on the corner of Taney and Tasker Streets, a few squares of South Philadelphia pavement outside the May Flower Chinese restaurant - a 15-foot stretch of concrete and asphalt that was once his world. A world he had been willing to die for. A world he had been willing to kill for. A world he had gone to war for. From that vantage point, Glasgow scanned the surrounding corners of Grays Ferry and counted off six others like the one where he stood: Six corners in a space not quite the size of a football field, ruled by crews of young men who see little for themselves but the lure of easy money and the threat of early death.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Recent census figures indicate that the influx of young adults, immigrants, and empty nesters to Philadelphia could be ebbing. The growth they have brought, especially to areas surrounding Center City, could recede, and neighborhoods that aren't ready for development could miss out on what's left of the trend. Philadelphia's Second Councilmanic District - encompassing parts of Center City, South Philadelphia, and Southwest Philadelphia - is especially vulnerable. With deep poverty as well as significant wealth, it has seen rapid change in areas like Point Breeze and Grays Ferry.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Ask Father Doug McKay to explain what's at the heart of his ministry in Grays Ferry, and he may tell you a story about two brothers. It's an afternoon 10 years ago, and he's sitting on the porch of his ministry house across from St. Gabe's Church. These two brothers from the neighborhood come running down the street, one chasing the other with a butcher knife. When they pass St. Gabe's, the brother with the knife doesn't miss a beat: He switches the knife into his left hand, makes the sign of the cross with his right, and keeps on running after his brother.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward A. Wiggins, 81, a former Pennsylvania legislator who represented a district in South Philadelphia during the 1970s and 1980s, died Sunday, March 8, of heart failure at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He was pronounced dead at the hospital after being rushed from his home in the King Village section of South Philadelphia, said his granddaughter Laurena Tolson. Mr. Wiggins was elected to the state House in 1976, was unseated in 1978, and won again in 1980.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
As corrupt police officers go, Jonathan Garcia was more brazen than most. Less than two years after joining the force, he was making illegal traffic stops and stealing cash seized from drug dealers. He sold heroin, often in uniform and in broad daylight, across the street from the 17th District station in South Philadelphia. And, as he explained to a federal Judge Wednesday, he did all of this thinking that was just the way the system worked in a city with a history of dirty cops.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"IT'S NOT ME!" William Pugh kept telling the stranger who approached him about 11:30 a.m. on the sidewalk outside his home in Grays Ferry that he had the wrong guy, his family told the Daily News . "It's not me," he repeated, before the unknown man, maybe out of frustration, maybe out of spite, pulled out a handgun and fired a round into Pugh's right leg. Not satisfied, the punk then walked onto the porch of the adjacent home, pried...
NEWS
November 15, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
NO PROTOTYPE exists for a hero. No blueprints to follow, no tests to pass. A hero can be someone with a troubled past, a seasoned police detective or a 17-year-old high school kid. Yesterday, City Council honored the heroes of two Philadelphia tales that made headlines last week - the civilians who saved a police officer from his burning car and the men and women who helped return an abducted woman home safely. "We do good things in Philadelphia," Councilwoman Cindy Bass said.
NEWS
October 21, 2014
LET'S GET IN the gutter for a bite to eat. In another of the myriad ways Philadelphia is evolving, now you can sit in the gutter, chill and eat at a parklet, a platform in a parking space. Here's something the world has been clamoring for. Well, maybe it has. We call them parklets. The first time I saw anything like this was in an Israeli Arab town, where they are called necessity. My family ate lamb kebab and hummus at a table placed perpendicular to the curb while cars - even a guy on horseback - rode by. If it's good enough for an Arab town, it's good enough for Philly.
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