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Great Debate

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NEWS
September 30, 1988 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Depending on whom one listens to, the great debate of the 1988 presidential campaign didn't come off because: (A) Former Mayor Frank L. Rizzo is afraid of state Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (Fumo's explanation). (B) Rizzo is too busy (Rizzo's explanation). "I don't know why he's afraid to discuss the issues of this campaign with me," Fumo said yesterday of Rizzo. "I'm sorry to hear he is so busy. I thought he was just sitting around grabbing a fat retirement check from the city's taxpayers.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
On May 20, 1787, 200 years ago yesterday, George Washington sat in Philadelphia and wrote to a Virginia friend that the federal convention called for May 14, 1787, had not yet begun because "not more than four states were represented yesterday. " ". . . These delays greatly impede public measures," Washington wrote, "and serve to sour the temper of the punctual members, who do not like to idle away their time. " The convention did not begin until May 25. Some tempers soured even further after it began.
NEWS
October 11, 2002 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congress' great debate over Iraq began with two of the Senate's gray eminences invoking Caesar and brandishing the Constitution, passionately arguing questions of war. It ended with a whimper - the outcome a foregone conclusion and the five days of debate bearing little resemblance to the toe-to-toe contest between Sens. John W. Warner (R., Va.) and Robert C. Byrd (D., W.Va.) that marked its beginning last Friday afternoon. As the House and Senate gave their backing, the doubters, the worriers and the potential opponents had convinced themselves that President Bush needed Congress to authorize the use of force against Iraq to win the U.N. Security Council to his side.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Students involved in street brawls and attempted rape, manipulative university administrators, unscrupulous coaches - what, another story about Oklahoma football? No. It's the Kenmont College debate team, the focus of the new movie "Listen to Me. " Debate coach Charlie Nichols (Roy Scheider) tells the Kenmont squad at the beginning of the season that "debate, as practiced here, is meaner than football. " He isn't kidding. Just to prove it, he gruffly tells a Kenmont girl with a leg brace that she'd better not use her bum leg to exact sympathy from the judges.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | By DAVID S. BRODER
One thing on which everyone could agree in the tense hours leading up to the deadline for war in the Persian Gulf was that Congress - that familiar whipping boy - had dealt with the issue of authorizing the use of force in a manner befitting the gravity of the subject. The weekend debate was civil and somber, always serious and often eloquent. Senators and representatives dealt respectfully with each others' arguments and showed compassion for the anguish even their opponents felt.
NEWS
April 15, 1996
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO CONSIDER ON THE 'GREAT SCHOOL DEBATE' Rather than furthering a reasoned, informed, factual debate about fiscal and educational issues facing the School District, what the Daily News seems to understand as a "great debate" has been "great" only in redundancy, opinion and distortion. The arrogant puffery and self-importance of Zack Stalberg's column (April 8) about advancing the so-called debate was staggering. On the same day Yvette Ousley's two-page so-called news story about standards contained neither news nor standards, but was blessedly contradicted by the following day's editorial.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | By George F. Will
At Henry IV's coronation, the archbishop anointed the king with oil said to have been given to Thomas Becket by the Virgin Mary (and the archbishop found the king's hair aswarm with lice). Republics, favoring simplicity, have less exotic civic liturgies - no stately ranks of bishops or oceans of ermine and silk. Republics rely on rhetoric to quicken the public pulse. America's pulse probably stayed steady during President Clinton's bland Inaugural Address, but he could not expect to excite while declaring the end of political excitements.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | By E.J. Dionne Jr
Republicans are supposed to be the party of states' rights. Democrats are supposed to be the party of the national government. So why is it that in the great debate over a patients' bill of rights, it's the Democrats who insist that patients should be able to sue their HMOs in state courts and Republicans, including President Bush, who see suits in state courts as an abomination? It may have something to do with the fact that patients generally get a better break and bigger settlements in state courts - the courts that are, as the Republicans would say on so many other issues, "closest to the people.
NEWS
September 26, 1988 | By Gene Seymour, Daily News Television Critic
As television, last night's Great Debate I was ultimately about as satisfying as a nine-inning pitchers' duel with lots of throwing that was hard, high and wild, some nibbling at the corners, a vigorous distribution of garbage hits and errors - and no scoring. Baseball contests of that type have their own peculiar fascination when you watch them, and there was something of that same riveting tension evident throughout those 90 minutes. But those who tuned into the debate came in expecting something decisive to come out at the end - or, at the very least, some evidence of triumph or collapse from one of the two combatants.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Maybe I'm a pointy-head, but in the debate I saw Sunday night, Michael Dukakis knocked George Bush around the ring for 90 minutes. Not clear out of the ring, mind you. Dukakis did not elicit from Bush a media-certified "gaffe. " Which is why the TV referees declined to declare a winner. They are required to set this ridiculously high "objective" standard for victory to avoid the charge of subjective, i.e., liberal, bias. Unless a candidate declares Poland free of Soviet domination (poor Gerald Ford, he was just a bit ahead of his time)
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NEWS
September 5, 2014
MAYBE IT'S the dog days of a late summer. Could they be causing people to act so uncivil? Another flight was diverted recently after two airline passengers got into a fight over a reclined seat. This is at least the third such skirmish reported in the last couple of weeks. First it was a United Airlines flight from Newark to Denver. It had to make an unscheduled stop in Chicago after a passenger wouldn't remove a device that kept the woman in front of him from reclining. Both were removed from the flight.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
MILTON ANDERSON was the consummate charmer. Dapper in his Sunday best, he would greet congregants at the door of the Reformation Lutheran Church in Mount Airy, paying special attention to the ladies, whom he would welcome in French. How cool was that?   "He was very suave," said his daughter, Tracey L. Anderson. Milton was a pillar of the church, not only as the greeter, but also as a member of the Men's Ministry and the Church Council. He also took it upon himself to provide transportation and guidance to those who needed help and a ride.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
It's no surprise that Republican front-runner Mitt Romney is being compared to the fictional "greed is good" capitalist Gordon Gekko. What's surprising is that the criticism is coming from members of his own pro-business party. The "class warfare" debate was supposed to wait for the general election, when whoever is the Republican nominee can be counted on to accuse President Obama of engaging in what is, by GOP standards, such despicable behavior. But the Republican also-rans in Iowa and New Hampshire are now attacking Romney as a capitalist job-killer.
SPORTS
December 7, 2010
ON FRIDAY famed rock guitarist Nils Lofgren published a letter scolding both the media and the NFL for praising and promoting Michael Vick, saying, "However repentant he may be, he committed acts whose vileness will resonate down the years. "Shame on the NFL for not banning him permanently," he wrote. "How can we justify this saga to our children?" Yesterday, Lofgren seemed to answer his own question with a more conciliatory follow-up, recognizing Vick's attempts to make amends by speaking out against dogfighting at schools and imploring reporters and commentators to, "Help him do his job and shine more of a regular light on his efforts off the field to abolish dogfighting.
NEWS
June 7, 2010
COLUMNIST Stu Bykofsky unequivocally believes bikes "will never become a significant alternative to private cars," and thus opposes plans to expand the number of bike lanes in Philadelphia. Mr. Bykofsky should try traveling outside Philadelphia before making such bold predictions. In cities all over the world, bikes are a major mode of transportation. In Amsterdam, for instance, more trips are taken by bike than car. And Amsterdam is a lot like Philadelphia: same population density, similar narrow historic streets and a large fleet of buses and trams.
NEWS
January 6, 2010
RE DOM Giordano's op-ed on the award to Michael Vick: The last time I looked, there was no mention of canines in our constitution or Bill of Rights. Normal people, unlike over-the-top dog-lovers think that Michael Vick was wrongly accused and prosecuted for crimes against a soulless animal who should have no civil rights and should not be taking up time in our courtrooms. Michael Vick shouldn't have served one day in jail. That makes him a hero. Mike Franklin, Marlton, N.J. Re the story about the ruling that upheld a verdict against the Pennsylvania SPCA: Laila Snead and the jury that ruled in her favor should be ashamed of themselves.
NEWS
December 7, 2009 | By FRANK DiCICCO
WHEN I introduced legislation requiring every bicycle to be registered, it certainly grabbed people's attention. Considering the city's lagging economy and job loss, continued concerns over crime and our struggling public school system, I was surprised by the passionate and emotional response I received. E-mails and phone calls have poured in that range from questioning my intelligence and work ethic to failing to comprehend why I would raise the issue at all to praising me as a hero to pedestrians and motorists.
NEWS
December 7, 2009 | By ALEX DOTY
CHAOS HAS reigned on Philadelphia's streets for too long. In the free-for-all on Philly roadways, 204 motorists, 105 pedestrians and 12 bicyclists lost their lives in the last three years. So I wholeheartedly agree with both Councilman DiCicco and Councilman Kenney that we need to take bold steps to make our streets - and sidewalks! - safer, even as I disagree with many particulars of what they've proposed. Bicyclists who don't follow the law are contributing to traffic chaos.
NEWS
July 15, 2008
RE DEBBIE Burns' response to my letter on parents of screaming brats in public places: It's hilarious that someone would tell me that I lack consideration when she has no problem with one child and his or her parents spoiling everyone else's outing. Consideration for others means that if someone's child starts throwing a tantrum, the parents remove the kid. Debbie asks how I was raised. I was taught to behave. To not scream, to not throw tantrums, and not spoil something for everyone around me. I was taught to have consideration and respect for others.
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