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Great Depression

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BUSINESS
November 2, 2008 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Does the current financial crisis resemble the run-up to the Great Depression? You betcha, some experts say. Decide for yourself with a look at history - and Ben S. Bernanke's book - at these sites. Teaching history. The project of the Center for History and New Media looks to be a resource for classroom discussion that might compare the Great Depression to today. It links to videos on demand from Annenberg Media's Learner.org, where you can watch explainers about booms and busts, monetary policy, inflation, stagflation, and economist John Maynard Keynes, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Making a television show about the Depression that is entertaining and informative without being gloomy and depressing is not an easy task. But the History Channel, again demonstrating its expertise and facility with real-life happenings, has done it. The Great Depression will air in four one-hour episodes, tonight through Thursday night at 9, on HIST. The near-perfect host is former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo. He demonstrates his fitness in his opening remarks, as he uses his own experience to illustrate how families so often helped one another through the trying and frightening 1930s: "My father had lost his job as a ditch digger when construction work virtually stopped after the [stock market]
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | By Msgr. S.J. Adamo
Back in the late '30s, when the government began to sponsor the arts as a way of fighting the Great Depression, stage plays were used as a means of propaganda to make the people more socially responsive. It may have helped, but it wasn't until the nation began to gear itself for World War II that the economy was pulled out of the doldrums and good jobs mushroomed everywhere. It was a form of socialism in warrior's garb. It worked and we have had no serious economic failings since those days.
NEWS
April 2, 2011 | By Christa Oestreich, ARCHBISHOP PRENDERGAST HIGH SCHOOL
Father is working long hours at the factory while mother has been trying to find a job of her own. But there are none. People line the streets for a bowl of soup; no one can afford anything more than that. At home, the children do not have shoes or adequate clothing. There is not enough money for coal, for beds, or to pay rent. This is how the world remembers the Great Depression 80 years ago. Today's recession looks like a stray cat compared with the Depression's roaring lion of the late 1920s and '30s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
"From one democracy - two definitions of liberty, each in conflict with the other. " Narrator Joe Morton's squib of a comment about the government's role in securing freedom for its citizens sums up the tension that provides the underpinning for PBS's ambitious The Great Depression, a seven-hour documentary that begins tomorrow on Channels 12 and 39. It might also summarize the tension that has powered most of the economic and social history...
NEWS
April 2, 2011 | By Alexandra Iacovetti, METHACTON HIGH SCHOOL
Historically, economic recessions such as the Great Depression, the Oil Crisis of the 1970s, and our current recession were brought on by many factors, but all served as a much-needed reality check on the American need to overindulge. One of the main causes of the Great Depression was factory overproduction. The high demand for cars and entertainment outlets such as radios and movies created a "great glut" out of American industry. More demand led to more innovation, and soon enough, more cost and time effective labor-saving machines replaced American workers, and increased unemployment.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
By William C. Kashatus If a picture's worth a thousand words, then Dorothea Lange's Depression-era photograph "Migrant Mother" warrants an entire book. Or at least that's the idea behind Marisa Silver's new novel, Mary Coin . The photo, taken in 1936 at a pea pickers' camp near Nipomo, Calif., depicts the lined and weary face of Florence Owens, a 32-year-old widowed migrant worker, with two of her hungry children resting on her shoulders and a baby on her lap. It has become the most iconic image of the Great Depression.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
THE COUNTRY is in economic quicksand, and no solution is in sight. Infusions of literally trillions of dollars, the nonstop printing of cheap money and the president's refusal to rid himself of advisers whose advice has proven ineffective have put the U.S. economy in an intractable position. Only two industries are thriving - pro sports and gambling venues. How long can they dodge the bullet? The Great Depression was canceled by World War II. It's a different ballgame today.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2002 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stocks dived in 1987. They slumped through most of the 1970s. But in our collective memories, there is only one Great Crash: 1929. To many Americans, that cosmic crash is so closely associated with the Great Depression that every market downturn since tends to raise the specter of recession or depression. With the Dow Jones industrial average and other major market indexes once again falling sharply, it seems worth asking whether drops in stock prices can topple the economy.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Swarthmore College alumni of decades past and present, it was time to give back to a place that transformed them. Don Mizell, 65, Class of 1971, donated his 2005 Grammy for Album of the Year, produced for Ray Charles, to the school's Black Cultural Center, which he pushed to get built as an anthropology student. "This is an outgrowth of my experience here," he said Saturday as he attended an alumni reunion event. "It's an act of gratitude and me saying, 'This [Grammy] exists because of you.' " Imitation is the best homage for Juan Victor Fajardo, 27, Class of 2009.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 23, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
The stock market keeps stretching to new highs. Is it a bubble? And if it is, when will it burst? Bubbles don't announce themselves clearly, so a look back at the history of bubbles is instructive. Booms, burst bubbles , crashes, and other economic upheavals have been going on forever. Harvard Business School offers a collection of case studies on U.S. busts back to the Panic of 1837 and including the famous stock-market bubble of 1925-29 that preceded the Great Depression. It also details the less-well-known real estate bubble that came just before that 1920s market boom and saw empty building lots in Miami being sold 10 times per day. If we only had learned . . . "Whatever else you might say about today's stock market, it is nowhere near as overheated as it was 14 years ago," Mark Hulbert wrote in this MarketWatch post in April, where he compared the market this year with the tech bust of spring 2000.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Swarthmore College alumni of decades past and present, it was time to give back to a place that transformed them. Don Mizell, 65, Class of 1971, donated his 2005 Grammy for Album of the Year, produced for Ray Charles, to the school's Black Cultural Center, which he pushed to get built as an anthropology student. "This is an outgrowth of my experience here," he said Saturday as he attended an alumni reunion event. "It's an act of gratitude and me saying, 'This [Grammy] exists because of you.' " Imitation is the best homage for Juan Victor Fajardo, 27, Class of 2009.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
For there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. - Shakespeare If one trait exemplifies what some call American exceptionalism, it's the ability of this nation's people to be optimistic no matter what tragedy or disappointment is heaped upon their plates. But polls suggest the Great Recession and its aftermath have done what the Great Depression could not: turn us into a nation of pessimists. Even amid clear signs of economic recovery, many - moved more by politics than facts - don't believe the future will be better.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
By George Ball A few years back I witnessed an unforgettable sight. Having just led some visitors around Burpee's Fordhook Farm floral display gardens, I noticed one man standing outside the garden, rocking back and forth, his eyes closed. Concerned, I asked him if everything was OK. "I . . . am . . . happy," he replied simply, lost in rapture. In his honor, we have named it the "Happiness Garden. " I mention this episode because our country is right now in the midst of an epidemic of unhappiness.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Eileen McCafferty DiFranco
My father's one claim to fame in the 1939 Northeast High School yearbook was that he was the shortest boy to graduate that year. At 63 inches, he was pictured in the yearbook shaking hands with the tallest guy on the basketball team. A resident of Port Richmond, my father attended Charles Carroll Elementary School and John Paul Jones Academy before enrolling in Northeast in 1936. In spite of the hardships imposed by the Depression, my father and his seven siblings, children of parents who never made it beyond fourth grade, all graduated from high school or business school.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
Savings found in switching Understanding energy deregulation and alternative electric supply admittedly is a complicated subject. But just as EnergyWorks helps homeowners choose a trusted, home energy-efficiency company, there are many solutions in the deregulated electricity area. In Illinois, there's Power2Switch. Texas has ChooseEnergy. And Pennsylvania has Alphabuyer ("Energy efficiency gets easier," April 21). Real estate writer Alan Heavens notes that he's using less energy every year, but his bill remains the same because the price of electricity goes up. From the Alphabuyer perspective, the data shows something different.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
By William C. Kashatus If a picture's worth a thousand words, then Dorothea Lange's Depression-era photograph "Migrant Mother" warrants an entire book. Or at least that's the idea behind Marisa Silver's new novel, Mary Coin . The photo, taken in 1936 at a pea pickers' camp near Nipomo, Calif., depicts the lined and weary face of Florence Owens, a 32-year-old widowed migrant worker, with two of her hungry children resting on her shoulders and a baby on her lap. It has become the most iconic image of the Great Depression.
SPORTS
December 18, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writersilaryt@phillynews.com
KEITH FLETCHER, we hardly knew ye. Not in the first half, anyway. A 6-6, 205-pound senior forward, Fletcher indeed received a starting nod Monday as Roberts Vaux hosted Communications Tech in a Public A basketball game between schools that are expected to close this June. But if you blinked, you missed him. He tried to block a shot. Tweet. Foul No. 1. He tried to block another shot. Tweet. Foul No. 2. "I thought I went straight up on those plays," Fletcher said. "The referee saw things otherwise.
SPORTS
December 18, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
KEITH FLETCHER, we hardly knew ye. Not in the first half, anyway. A 6-6, 205-pound senior forward, Fletcher indeed received a starting nod Monday as Roberts Vaux hosted Communications Tech in a Public A basketball game between schools that are expected to close this June. But if you blinked, you missed him. He tried to block a shot. Tweet. Foul No. 1. He tried to block another shot. Tweet. Foul No. 2. "I thought I went straight up on those plays," Fletcher said. "The referee saw things otherwise.
NEWS
December 27, 2011
Since the Great Recession of 2008, many have said that America's time as the leading power of the globe is past. Mark Steyn's best-selling After America: Get Ready for Armaged don offers the bracing budgetary fact that "we need $15 trillion just to be flat broke. " Thomas Friedman of the New York Times regularly suggests that China's high-speed trains and other modern accoutrements provide a stark contrast between the ever-progressing People's Republic and the physically and intellectually decaying American one. To underscore the reality of our decline, President Obama, who more than any past leader has spoken of America's many failings (real and imagined)
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