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NEWS
November 29, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ONEKAMA, MICH. - For more than a century, easy access to Lake Michigan has made Onekama a popular place for summer visitors and a refuge for boaters fleeing dangerous storms. Now, the community itself needs a rescue, from slumping lake levels that threaten its precious link to open water. The Great Lakes, the world's biggest freshwater system, are shrinking because of drought and rising temperatures, a trend that accelerated with this year's almost snowless winter and scorching summer.
NEWS
March 31, 1986 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're preparing for war here. Tons and tons of dirt and clay have been dumped onto beautiful front lawns and shoveled into ugly ramparts that encircle houses. Steel breakwaters, concrete barriers and wooden balustrades have been erected. Homeowners, using jacks and hoists, have elevated their houses, and moved furnaces, washers and dryers from their basements. City officials have sealed manhole covers, organized evacuation teams, and invoked emergency and nuisance ordinances to force indifferent residents to protect themselves.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vanilla beaches of fine-grain sand. Seagulls swooping overhead. Sailboats on the horizon. Fluffy white clouds in an azure sky. Out to the east as far as you can see, unbroken horizons of blue, blue water. Door County. Call it the Midwest's revenge. For years, we Eastern snobs looked down our noses at the Great Lakes. What possible reason could there be to trade the mighty Atlantic for a vacation here? As far as we seaboarders knew, these were oversized puddles, rust-belt sewers that were boring at best and toxic at worst.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | BY DAVE BARRY
I had hoped that we could get the new year under way without any reports of ecologically dangerous shellfish attacking women's undergarments, but I see now that I was a fool. I have here an alarming news article written by Christopher Taylor of The Watertown (N.Y.) Daily Times and sent in by several alert readers. The headline, which I am not making up, says: "Large Colony of Zebra Mussels Found Clinging to Big Brassiere. " In case you haven't heard, the zebra mussel is a hot new environmental threat.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | By Melanie Eversley, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Lake Champlain is all washed up when it comes to being a "Great Lake. " An agreement reached Monday night between Michigan and Vermont Congress members makes it easier for Vermont schools to obtain funds to study environmental problems exclusive to the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. But it reverses the designation of Champlain as a Great Lake that was signed into law earlier this month. "We have agreed to call Lake Champlain a cousin instead of a little brother to those larger lakes in the Midwest, while accomplishing our goal of improving the ecology of the lake," said Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D., Vt.)
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Never mind that Cleveland has been most famous in recent years for rivers that are so polluted they catch fire and the reek from Lake Erie that's severe enough to singe the eyebrows - just wait until 2080. While New York City will be parched, Iowa and Nebraska will be a desert, and Miami will be fighting the ocean in its streets, a new study shows that Cleveland will be one of the "garden spots of tomorrow. " In the Great Greenhouse of the next century, as predicted by scientists studying the effects of pollution on global weather, Cleveland will have a balmy climate and plenty of water.
SPORTS
August 2, 1996 | By Beth Onufrak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wissahickon's Jami Wilus hit six three-point baskets and scored a game-high 22 points to lead the Delaware Valley scholastic female basketball team to a 74-72 victory over Great Lakes yesterday on the second day of competition at the 15th annual Keystone State Games. Delaware Valley recovered from a 42-28 halftime deficit to earn the win. Hatboro-Horsham's Matt Carroll had 24 points and shot 8 for 10 from the free-throw line and Abington's Keith Dinkins added 16 points to lead the Delaware Valley scholastic male basketball team to a 100-91 victory over Great Lakes.
SPORTS
September 26, 1989 | This feature was written by Donnat Grillet, Division of Social Studies, District Four, School District of Philadelphia. The graphics were conceived by Donnat Grillet and executed by Daily News staff artist Bruny Roldan. The page was edited by Jerry Carrier of the Daily News
HERE'S ILLINOIS 'The Prairie State' Key Physical Features: Lake Michigan, Illinois River, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Wabash River, Illinois Ozarks, Mississippi Palisades. SPOTLIGHT ON CHICAGO 'The Windy City' Chicago is the greatest inland port city in the world! Chicago is the only place where the Great Lakes link with the Mississippi River system. More steel and machinery come from factories around Chicago than any other area in the world!
SPORTS
August 5, 1994 | By Beth Onufrak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delaware Valley junior baseball team clinched a spot in the gold medal game at the 13th annual Keystone Games by winning the National Pool with a 3-0 record. Delaware Valley will face the American Pool winner, Blue Mountain or Philadelphia, today at 9 a.m. in Riverside Stadium at Harrisburg's City Island. Strath Haven's Greg Withelder allowed three hits and no earned-runs as Delaware Valley beat Pocono, 2-1, in its first game yesterday. Downingtown's Scott Selcher had a two-run single in that win. In its second game of the day, Delaware Valley took a 3-0 lead over Great Lakes, but fell behind, 8-6, before winning, 12-8.
SPORTS
August 7, 1995 | By Nick Fierro, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If there is any doubt that ice hockey is not a brutally physical game, then consider the contribution Richard Podulka made to the Philadelphia/Delaware Valley Junior team yesterday at the Keystone State Games. Podulka, a Philadelphia resident and graduate of Germantown Academy, did not score a goal or record an assist in his team's 6-3, silver-medal-clinching triumph over Great Lakes/Nittany. But he was penalized once for two minutes as Philadelphia/Delaware Valley established its presence early.
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NEWS
February 13, 2016 | RealTime Desk
Vigorous snow showers passed through parts the region Thursday morning, leaving up to a half-inch of snow, and more are possible. The snow dusted roadways, and slowed rush-hour traffic for a time, but no incidents were reported. The showers could continue for the next few hours, the National Weather Service says, possbily reducing visibilities to under a mile. Unfortunately, it isn't possible to predict precisely where they will hit, said Valerie Meola at the weather service office in Mount Holly.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Kristin Kennedy needed to get her younger sister, Rebecca, out of the house while others prepared for a surprise 16th birthday party. The plan: ice skating at Cooper River Park in Pennsauken. But holy Mercury! Sunday was not like most January days. The temperature hit 65 degrees in the early afternoon in Philadelphia, breaking the record of 63 degrees set in 1950. Throw in the heavy rains from the night before, and the rink in South Jersey was unable to open Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lee Wehle, 90, formerly of Narberth, a civil engineer for the state Department of Transportation, died Monday, Nov. 23, at Blue Bell Place after a bout with pneumonia. Mr. Wehle led a life full of what he liked to call "ordinary adventure. " He attended school in New London, Conn. On May 23, 1939, he was in math class when students began flocking to the windows and cheering. Steaming past them down the Thames River was the Falcon, a former minesweeper on its way to reach 59 sailors trapped aboard the submarine Squalus, which was disabled on the ocean floor off Portsmouth, N.H. "It was a sight he never forgot," said daughter Ellen.
NEWS
June 8, 2015
ISSUE | OIL TRAINS Safer routes The reality is that Bakken oil trains endanger thousands in the Delaware Valley, rail accidents are a daily reality, and federal regulations are too weak ("Good safety record, getting better," June 2). Better to transport oil by ship through the Great Lakes directly to refineries. Leaders in City Hall need to demand that no lives be imperiled so that Philadelphia can become an energy hub. |Michael Volpe, Philadelphia, mvolpe1@verizon.net ISSUE | CLIMATE Role for church Climate-altering pollution is leading to more deadly storms, drought, and famine - impacts disproportionately felt by the poorest in our communities ("Santorum says Pope Francis should butt out of climate debate," June 3)
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore Eisen, 87, a former executive with the Air Safety Foundation in Washington, died of complications from dementia on Wednesday, Nov. 19, at the Wiley Christian Retirement Community in Marlton. In the 1980s, Mr. Eisen was vice president of research and planning for the foundation, an arm of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. According to an article in the association's magazine, Mr. Eisen and his staff researched noncommercial aircraft accidents to help aviation manufacturers improve their products.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Staff Writer
ALLEGIANCES ASIDE, the sport is always better when Notre Dame is part of the conversation. See 2012. Brian Kelly's Fighting Irish, who won't play a true road game until Oct. 18 at Florida State, are 4-0. They have beaten Rice, Michigan, Purdue and Syracuse, none of which will be playing in a BCS bowl. Still, they have won by an average of 23 points. So they're ranked ninth, behind eight other unbeatens. And at this point, all anybody really knows for sure is that the worst team in the SEC West might be one of the better teams in almost any other division/conference.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
You couldn't drink it. You couldn't bathe in it. You couldn't wash dishes in it. A bloom of toxin-producing, blue-green algae in Lake Erie had rendered the water unsafe and forced Toledo, Ohio, to shut down its system for several days. Could it happen here? Exceedingly unlikely, Philadelphia-area water officials say. They do see the same algae in local waters, but the difference is, it doesn't grow out of control here or, for reasons unknown, produce the same toxins. But officials here have plenty of other types of algae to contend with, albeit mostly ones that affect taste and odor and clog filters, rather than harm people.
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Outside the city on a broad hillside, thick with green underbrush and shaded by poplar trees, Sam Ricks hacks through tangled knots of weeds with his machete - leaving no stone unexamined in his quest to identify the dead. Ricks is leading an effort to locate Medal of Honor winners and hundreds of other long-forgotten Navy and Marine veterans buried in Mount Moriah Cemetery, the historic, abandoned graveyard that straddles Philadelphia and Yeadon. Its 21 medal honorees may be the most buried in any cemetery in the country, according to a military expert.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By John Flesher, Associated Press
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. - As a teenager, Steve Libert was mesmerized by a teacher's stories of the brash 17th-century French explorer La Salle, who journeyed across the Great Lakes and down the Mississippi in a quest for a trade route to the Far East that he hoped would bring riches and renown. Particularly intriguing was the tale of the Griffin, a vessel that La Salle built and sailed from Niagara Falls to the shores of present-day Wisconsin before sending it back for more supplies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013
AFTER A MERE 104 years, Shiner Bock is finally available in Philadelphia. The Texas lager is already for sale in more than 40 states, so this is not exactly earthshaking news. But it does make you wonder: What took so long? And, more importantly, is it too late? Shiner, made by Spoetzel Brewing, is a lot like Pennsylvania's D.G. Yuengling & Son. It's old as the hills (founded in 1909). It's small compared to Anheuser-Busch but large by microbrewing standards. And it has an avid fan base on its home turf.
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