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Great Satan

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NEWS
November 20, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
With all the front page news out of Washington lately, the Persian Gulf seems to have gotten lost in the shuffle. That's quite a vanishing trick for a body of water that's almost 700 miles long and littered with rocket-ripped, mine-mangled flotsam. But trust the U.S. news media to decide when the public has reached its saturation point on any given subject. For those who don't feel saturated, however, the most intriguing news out of the Persian Gulf lately is that there seems to be one less "Great Satan" on Iran's hate list.
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | By Carol Horner, Inquirer Staff Writer
He is the son and grandson of clergymen, a lover of poetry, an economist and civil engineer. Tall, dark-haired, dark-eyed and very serious, he has a job that requires him and his young wife to live in the very country his revered leader has called "the Great Satan. " But diplomat that he is, Mohammad Jaafar Mahallati, Iranian ambassador to the United Nations, is eager to provide an explanation for that little bit of nasty rhetoric dispensed by the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini a decade ago. "You see, what has been referred to as 'Great Satan' . . . definitely is not United States as a country.
NEWS
July 28, 1988
One of Iran's senior leaders has offered his country's help in obtaining the release of American hostages in Lebanon. The price: the return of Iranian assets frozen in the United States after the 1979 seizure of the American Embassy in Tehran. A White House spokesman gave a succinct and correct response: "No deal. " The Iranian offer reflects a growing penchant for realism, now that the Islamic revolution is collapsing under the burden of an endless, unnecessary war. The regime, which has finally agreed to accept a cease-fire in its war with Iraq, seems intent on ending its international isolation.
NEWS
April 17, 2006 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
As a public service, I've written a speech for President Bush to use when we invade Iran. "My fellow Americans: "Thirty minutes ago, on my command, the United States, leading a coalition of peace-loving nations, began striking targets in Iran. This is the opening stage of a broad and concerted campaign to defend the civilized world from the threat posed by nuculer weapons in the hands of a regime known for supporting terror. "In the spring of 2006, Iran announced that it had, for the first time, enriched uranium, a key process in the production of fuel for nuculer reactors and nuculer weapons.
NEWS
July 6, 1988
Yes, a lot of the Iranian leadership is nuts. And yes, there does seem to be a problem of Iranian air controllers sending commercial jets over a war zone as blithely as we Americans are sent out of O'Hare. And certainly there has been a pattern of commercial pilots flying over the Persian Gulf getting tired of continually identifying themselves to everybody who's got a gun, which is everybody. And Iranian pilots, almost suicidally, have this habit of not responding to calls from the Great Satan, even though the Great Satan has them in his gunsights.
NEWS
October 20, 1987
The United States had no option but to retaliate for the Iranian attack Friday on a U.S.-flagged oil tanker berthed in Kuwait. The provocation was not as great as it would have been if the ship had been in international waters under the protection of American warships, but the missile strike against the ship while it was in Kuwait's harbor was clearly a test of U.S. will. If Washington had not reacted, the American military presence in the Persian Gulf would have lost its credibility.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Nov. 4, Iranians celebrated the 16th anniversary of the takeover of the "Espionage Den" - the U.S. Embassy where Americans were held prisoner for 444 days. The date is a national holiday here, Struggle Against Global Arrogance Day. Thousands of young Iranians gathered in front of the former embassy, fists raised, chanting, "Death to America. " The air was thick with soot from a bonfire burning countless American flags and effigies of Uncle Sam. As speakers fired off a stream of vitriol against the Great Satan, an American visitor was politely ushered though security lines to the foot of the stage by his government hosts.
NEWS
August 29, 2006
Another Bush visit? I am responding to the heartbreaking Aug. 24 article "Rescued, now trapped," which detailed the plight of the elderly survivors of Katrina who have become poverty-stricken strangers in a strange land. These helpless souls are at the mercy of FEMA, insurance companies, and time - which they have little of. The same day there was the article "Katrina recovery takes time, Bush says. " The article noted that President Bush planned to spend two days in the hurricane-ravaged regions to mark the one-year anniversary, during which time he is scheduled to dine with officials, give a speech, pray, and speak with residents.
NEWS
May 15, 2006 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
YOU HAVE to admire Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The president of Iran (whose resume also includes stints as an academic and alleged hostage-taker at the U.S. embassy in Tehran) has carved out some time from his busy schedule to give George Bush lessons on religion, politics and international etiquette. It's amazing that he found a few spare moments to write an 18-page letter to our commander in chief, consumed as he is with more important affairs of state like increasing the probability of a nuclear holocaust and terrorizing his own people.
SPORTS
June 22, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
As much as U.S. players tried to spin it, their exasperated expressions said it all. When for once soccer was big news back home, the Americans were humiliated by Iran, 2-1, last night in Lyon, France, eliminated from the World Cup by one of the weakest teams in the field. "It's not easy, it kind of sits in your stomach," U.S. midfielder Claudio Reyna said after players quickly shuffled out of the stadium. "It's a bad feeling. " They wanted to show the world they should be taken seriously, that the United States no longer is a soccer backwater.
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NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Call him the anti-Ahmadinejad. In preparation for his speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday (the same day as President Obama), the new Iranian president, Hassan Rowhani, has conducted a diplomatic offensive of astonishing proportions, including an exchange of letters with Obama, network interviews, tweets, and an op-ed in the Washington Post. Rowhani's message: Iran is a responsible international actor with no intention of seeking a nuclear bomb. Subtext: No more bombastic denunciations of America and the West or Holocaust denials at the U.N. podium or other forums.
NEWS
February 10, 2012
Most important thing about Iran A military attack on Iran's nuclear program is fraught with hazards, as Trudy Rubin correctly notes ("Israeli strike on Iran: Why we should worry," Sunday). But assertions by American officials that "the most important thing is to keep the international community unified" are mistaken. The "most important thing" is keeping nuclear weapons out of the hands of Iran before nuclear devices explode in American cities, or a high-altitude nuclear explosion severely damages our electronic infrastructure.
NEWS
August 29, 2006
Another Bush visit? I am responding to the heartbreaking Aug. 24 article "Rescued, now trapped," which detailed the plight of the elderly survivors of Katrina who have become poverty-stricken strangers in a strange land. These helpless souls are at the mercy of FEMA, insurance companies, and time - which they have little of. The same day there was the article "Katrina recovery takes time, Bush says. " The article noted that President Bush planned to spend two days in the hurricane-ravaged regions to mark the one-year anniversary, during which time he is scheduled to dine with officials, give a speech, pray, and speak with residents.
NEWS
May 15, 2006 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
YOU HAVE to admire Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The president of Iran (whose resume also includes stints as an academic and alleged hostage-taker at the U.S. embassy in Tehran) has carved out some time from his busy schedule to give George Bush lessons on religion, politics and international etiquette. It's amazing that he found a few spare moments to write an 18-page letter to our commander in chief, consumed as he is with more important affairs of state like increasing the probability of a nuclear holocaust and terrorizing his own people.
NEWS
April 17, 2006 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
As a public service, I've written a speech for President Bush to use when we invade Iran. "My fellow Americans: "Thirty minutes ago, on my command, the United States, leading a coalition of peace-loving nations, began striking targets in Iran. This is the opening stage of a broad and concerted campaign to defend the civilized world from the threat posed by nuculer weapons in the hands of a regime known for supporting terror. "In the spring of 2006, Iran announced that it had, for the first time, enriched uranium, a key process in the production of fuel for nuculer reactors and nuculer weapons.
SPORTS
June 22, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
As much as U.S. players tried to spin it, their exasperated expressions said it all. When for once soccer was big news back home, the Americans were humiliated by Iran, 2-1, last night in Lyon, France, eliminated from the World Cup by one of the weakest teams in the field. "It's not easy, it kind of sits in your stomach," U.S. midfielder Claudio Reyna said after players quickly shuffled out of the stadium. "It's a bad feeling. " They wanted to show the world they should be taken seriously, that the United States no longer is a soccer backwater.
SPORTS
June 21, 1998 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Was this what the Ayatollah Khomeini had in mind? Iran's soccer team at the World Cup, staying in a chateau that serves as a school for pastry chefs, with a coach from California whose wife runs Beau Visage, a skin-care business/vegetarian restaurant in Palo Alto, Calif.? Iran will play the United States today in Lyon in a match whose political contrasts seem almost too easy. But while at least one of Iran's players acknowledges that "it is imperative we win against the U.S.A.," nobody in camp has called the opponent the "Great Satan.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Nov. 4, Iranians celebrated the 16th anniversary of the takeover of the "Espionage Den" - the U.S. Embassy where Americans were held prisoner for 444 days. The date is a national holiday here, Struggle Against Global Arrogance Day. Thousands of young Iranians gathered in front of the former embassy, fists raised, chanting, "Death to America. " The air was thick with soot from a bonfire burning countless American flags and effigies of Uncle Sam. As speakers fired off a stream of vitriol against the Great Satan, an American visitor was politely ushered though security lines to the foot of the stage by his government hosts.
NEWS
September 21, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Is it possible that George Bush has a new Iranian card to play in a bid to retain his presidency, after allegedly playing one while campaigning to caddy for Ronald Reagan in 1980? In what was described by two good authors as the "October Surprise," Bush was reported to have sealed a deal for Iran to delay freeing hostages seized in the takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran until the release was too late to boost President Jimmy Carter's fading hopes for re-election. Though Bush has always denied knowlege of such a plot, he has never fully dispelled suspicions that it did unfold and that he was a prime mover.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Without firing a shot, Iran is positioning itself to be one of the prime beneficiaries of the gulf war. Iran, long considered the wild card of the crisis, is hoping to emerge as the pre-eminent power in the gulf, while confirming its standing as leader of the revolutionary Muslim movement, experts say. The aims sought by Iranian President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani through a policy of rather active neutrality appear to be a weakened Iraq;...
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