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Great Society

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
It has occurred to me more than once that University City Science Center employees are not paying enough attention to the contemporary-art exhibitions in their Esther M. Klein Art Gallery, which occupies at least a quarter, or possibly even a third, of the building's lobby. I've rarely seen more than one other person in the gallery on my visits there, though I see and hear a steady stream of laughing passersby headed to and from the elevators. Do these people know what's going on under their very noses?
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | By NEAL PEIRCE
In the wake of the most destructive urban riots of the 20th century, President Bush and his crew have been offering us old bromides. They blame the "liberal" social programs of the '60s. They talk about getting more welfare recipients to work, selling off public housing, giving tax breaks to investors, and they've set up a federal-state task force to prosecute the rioters. There's an ounce of sense in a couple of their ideas. But look at the military occupation force now controlling this city, the incinerated stores, the shattered communities, and the administration's prescriptions seem wildly insufficient.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By David S. Broder
He's not the oldest or longest-serving of the 21 House members who are retiring this year and not running for other offices. He may not have had the political impact of a much more junior Republican retiree, New York's Bill Paxon, who appeared to be on track to a speakership until he fell out with former ally Newt Gingrich. But my hunch is that no one will be more missed by his colleagues of both parties than Lee Hamilton of Indiana, who is ending a notable 34-year career in the House with the adjournment of this Congress.
NEWS
November 13, 2002
This ceremony is a celebration of a group of Americans who displayed impressive values in a terrible time and in a terrible place. . . . love of country, faith, and the courage to care about your friends. . . . Most important, when you are utterly terrified, you do not turn and run, but stand and fight, because your friends are counting on you. Today we have a great opportunity to acknowledge that those qualities are crucial in creating a society where the opportunity to achieve is possible without eliminating the caring and compassion that are hallmarks of a great society.
NEWS
June 20, 1997
In August 1963, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. voiced his dream of a world where children are judged by the content of their character rather than the color of their skin. A few months later, President Lyndon Johnson said: "The Great Society is a place where every child can find knowledge to enrich his mind and to enlarge his talents. " Three decades and $5.4 trillion of federal government spending later, King's dream remains unfulfilled and the Great Society has become an expensive failed tribute to the liberal imagination.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Robert W. Patterson
"The press is trying to paint me as trying to undo the New Deal. ... I'm trying to undo the Great Society. " - Ronald Reagan, January 1982 diary entry Faced with an economic crisis during his first year in the Oval Office, Ronald Reagan was demagogued by the media, welfare-industry lobbyists, and Democratic leaders who accused the former California governor of balancing the budget on the backs of the poor, elderly, and disabled....
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
With his appeal for health-care reform, President Clinton is seeking to cap off a half-century of government efforts to protect Americans from the ravages of sickness, old age and poverty. In size, cost and complexity, Clinton's proposed American Health Security Act ranks with the sweeping goals of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal in the 1930s and Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society in the 1960s. If Congress approves all or most of his plan, he will have passed a political test of the kind that comes along once in a generation.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | BY CAL THOMAS
The selection of Jack Kemp as secretary of housing and urban development indicates that the Republican Party is about to develop a soul. For decades, Democrats have successfully and sometimes accurately portrayed Republicans as rich, white country club members. In a recent interview, Kemp told me, "George Bush has the best chance of any Republican president in this century of touching the lives of the poor in a positive way. " And why should Republicans care about the poor, particularly the black poor, when most of them have voted for Democrats for decades?
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | by Louis Winnick, From the New York Times
America's disaffection with politics has energized a movement to "reinvent government" by slashing bureaucracy and making public agencies more efficient and responsive. "What we are describing," David Osborne writes in his book "Reinventing Government," "is nothing less than a shift in the basic model of governance used in America. " The central problem of governments, says Osborne, is "not what they do, but how they operate. " Accordingly, he presents a catalog of exemplary innovations in public management, most at the state and local level.
NEWS
January 13, 1987
The Dec. 30 editorial "Let neighborhoods share downtown's good fortune" made convincing arguments for the concept of linkage - requiring downtown developers to put up money to revitalize the city's decaying neighborhoods. And it has an apt warning: that any linkage fund "should retain its specialness and be spent in ways that minimize, reduce the potential for demoralizing rip-offs and tangibly improve the quality of life for residents of declining neighborhoods. " I would like to add some caveats before we go plunging into such a huge, complex effort, as well intended as it might be. Has it been determined that Center City development can actually produce the revenue contemplated?
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NEWS
November 5, 2012
'Ronald Reagan changed the trajectory of America in a way that Richard Nixon did not and in a way that Bill Clinton did not. " That was Barack Obama in 2008. And he was right. Reagan was an ideological inflection point, ending a 50-year liberal ascendancy and beginning a 30-year conservative ascendancy. It is common for one party to take control and enact its ideological agenda. Ascendancy, however, occurs only when the opposition inevitably regains power and then proceeds to accept the basic premises of the preceding revolution.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Robert W. Patterson
"The press is trying to paint me as trying to undo the New Deal. ... I'm trying to undo the Great Society. " - Ronald Reagan, January 1982 diary entry Faced with an economic crisis during his first year in the Oval Office, Ronald Reagan was demagogued by the media, welfare-industry lobbyists, and Democratic leaders who accused the former California governor of balancing the budget on the backs of the poor, elderly, and disabled....
NEWS
March 9, 2008
Poverty's enabler Harold Jackson's column "Quieter, still destructive, riots today" (Inquirer, March 2) fails to acknowledge that, even after affirmative action and President Lyndon Johnson's Great Society programs of the 1960s, no amount of money will break the sense that a community is being dumped on. Jackson points to the 40-year-old Kerner report as if it is speaking about today's America. Obviously, America is not as backward as it was then. The column should have focused on the causes of poverty that continue to plague black communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
It has occurred to me more than once that University City Science Center employees are not paying enough attention to the contemporary-art exhibitions in their Esther M. Klein Art Gallery, which occupies at least a quarter, or possibly even a third, of the building's lobby. I've rarely seen more than one other person in the gallery on my visits there, though I see and hear a steady stream of laughing passersby headed to and from the elevators. Do these people know what's going on under their very noses?
NEWS
February 26, 2007 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
One month and 1,400 e-mails later, here is a progress report on What Works. That's a series of columns I started last month in which I asked folks to tell me, in 250 words or less, about programs in their communities that have shown success in improving the lives of black children in five specific areas: self-esteem, violence prevention, education, fatherlessness and poverty. And then came the deluge. So far, I've read through about 400 of your 1,400 e-mails. Let me share some impressions: 1. There are some rather . . . visionary thinkers out there.
NEWS
November 13, 2002
This ceremony is a celebration of a group of Americans who displayed impressive values in a terrible time and in a terrible place. . . . love of country, faith, and the courage to care about your friends. . . . Most important, when you are utterly terrified, you do not turn and run, but stand and fight, because your friends are counting on you. Today we have a great opportunity to acknowledge that those qualities are crucial in creating a society where the opportunity to achieve is possible without eliminating the caring and compassion that are hallmarks of a great society.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John DiIulio, director of the federal government's new Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, insisted yesterday that "fact, not faith," would guide the Bush administration's efforts to enhance the role of religious and volunteer organizations doing social work. "The President wants results," DiIulio told a news conference in his office at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is on unpaid leave from his duties as Penn's Fox Leadership professor of politics, religion and civil society.
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | by William J. Lynott
It's been nearly 30 years since the United States officially decided to join the rest of the world by converting to the metric system. So how come it hasn't happened yet? How come we're still clunking around with our inches, pounds and quarts. Some observers blame you and me. They say that we can't deal with concepts that have arcane names like liters and kilometers. Whether that's the reason or not, the conversion to metrics - like old soldiers - has been allowed to just fade away.
NEWS
December 10, 1999 | by George McGovern
Like many Americans, I was deeply opposed to Lyndon Johnson's pursuit of the Vietnam War. My views on the war have not changed, but my opinion of Johnson has. I believe now that with the exceptions of Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Roosevelt - and perhaps Theodore Roosevelt - Lyndon Johnson was the greatest president since Abraham Lincoln. John Kenneth Galbraith called recently for a reassessment of Johnson, arguing that history was unfair in identifying his presidency primarily with the war. Galbraith is on the mark.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By David S. Broder
He's not the oldest or longest-serving of the 21 House members who are retiring this year and not running for other offices. He may not have had the political impact of a much more junior Republican retiree, New York's Bill Paxon, who appeared to be on track to a speakership until he fell out with former ally Newt Gingrich. But my hunch is that no one will be more missed by his colleagues of both parties than Lee Hamilton of Indiana, who is ending a notable 34-year career in the House with the adjournment of this Congress.
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