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Great War

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
An index of American popular sentiment about war can be found in the adjectives we use to describe our 20th-century conflicts. Vietnam was called "the undeclared war," Korea "the necessary war," World War II "the good war. " World War I was "the great war" - so dubbed not for its strategic implications as for the manner in which it transformed Europe. That transformation, which recast divisions of nation and class, is the subject of "The Great War - 70 Years Later," a provocative film series at the Free Library of Philadelphia main branch through Jan. 24. Except for that pacifist manifesto, All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Charles Radford tried to enlist in the U.S. Marines in 1917, he was rejected because of flat feet. Radford was 17 and eager to see some action after the entrance of the United States into World War I. A Marine officer suggested that he walk down the block to the Navy recruiting center. "They'll take you," the Marine told Radford. "They did," Radford recalled. "The Navy had an office on the second floor at 12th and Arch Streets, and my feet were OK for them. " Radford was among the more than 4.74 million Americans who volunteered or were drafted for the Great War, of whom 2.5 million were shipped overseas.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Sacco's new book is an epic comic that depicts the horror of trench warfare during World War I. It's an accordion-style volume that opens into a single 24-foot-long panoramic drawing. Called The Great War: July 1, 1916, The First Day of the Battle of the Somme (W.W. Norton, 54 pages, $35), its origins go back to the author and artist's boyhood in Australia. Sacco, who will read at the Free Library of Philadelphia Thursday night, was born on the island of Malta in the Mediterranean Sea. When he was an infant, his parents emigrated to Australia, where every April 25 is Anzac Day, commemorating the casualties suffered by Australian and New Zealand soldiers during the invasion of Gallipoli in WWI. "They sacrificed so much blood there that it really entered the Australian national psyche," says Sacco, 53, author of masterful books of empathetic war-zone comic journalism, including Palestine and Safe Area Gorazde . "When I was a boy, they would stop class and play stories about World War I servicemen," he says, talking from New York this week.
NEWS
July 31, 2009 | By John Rossi
Ninety-five years ago this week, World War I began. The Great War, as it was called, is not well-understood in the United States, partly because our involvement was relatively minor, lasting only 20 months. But World War I was the key to the 20th century - the conflict that shaped the rest of that most brutal of centuries. Many of the problems that we confront today date to World War I, not to the better-known Second World War. Consider terrorism. World War I was instigated by a terrorist organization, the Black Hand of Serbia, when it assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne.
NEWS
September 5, 1995 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a year of commemorations of the half-century since World War II, Ray H. Fuller is one of those few Americans with firsthand memories of an even earlier generation's march across France and of forests flattened by artillery fire. "If it wasn't for World War I," said Fuller, a sturdy, lighthearted, 99- year-old former construction worker, "there wouldn't have been a World War II. " Seventy-seven years have passed since the end of that earlier war with Germany - supposedly "the war to end all wars" - for which the United States fielded an army of 4.7 million men. But it was so long ago, and the world has changed so much, that Fuller, who lost a brother in the war and was shot through the left arm in France, is one of only 15 men, ages 95 to 101, attending the national convention of the Veterans of World War I of the U.S.A.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a half-century ago, the club members sealed a bottle of Hennessy cognac in a glass canister and vowed not to open it - not until all but one of them had died. The last man, they said, would have the honor of toasting his departed comrades and remembering them to a world that had changed many times over since they went to war in 1918. One hundred and eight veterans of the "Great War" formed the Last Man's Club at American Legion Post 38. They have held dinners every year since 1940, their numbers dwindling.
NEWS
November 1, 1986 | By Norman Podhoretz
Once upon a time - 50 years ago, to be exact - hundreds of young Americans voluntarily went off to fight and, many of them, to die for the government of Spain in its war aginst a rebel army led by Gen. Francisco Franco. These American boys, together with young men from a host of other countries, had been recruited into International Brigades by their local Communist Parties acting on orders from Moscow. Not all the recruits were communists, though the great majority were. But unlike their European comrades, 80 percent of whom came from the working class, the Americans of the Abraham Lincoln Battalion were mostly students.
NEWS
November 11, 2003
Carroll Hosbrook, a farm boy from Blue Ash, Ohio, found himself near Compiegne, France, on Nov. 11, 1918, the very place and day the Armistice was signed that ended the First World War. Hosbrook faithfully wrote his grandmother, Sarepta Hosbrook, during the war, including the letter below, taken from the family collection of his nephew, James F. Burns, professor emeritus in the department of industrial and systems engineering at the University of...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
PBS likes to ask: "If PBS doesn't do it, who will?" Well, there's cable, which now churns out shows in all the old familiar PBS genres - science, period drama, historical documentaries, children's programs, public affairs . . . But PBS doesn't send a bill. So, for the price of a small donation (or free, for those able to withstand guilt-inducing pledge drives), PBS will be serving up costume dramas, documentaries and celebrities in the wild. The West (Tonight-Sept.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
Like soldiers standing at attention, green uniforms hang in a long row in the back of Bob Ford's Coatesville home. Each uniform, like the man who wore it more than 70 years ago, is different from the rest. They are remnants of the Great War. And Ford is their guardian. For 20 years, Ford has been building a collection of World War I memorabilia. And he knows each piece and its owner well - about 500 men and women who fought in the "war for civilization" have their mementos under Ford's care.
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NEWS
May 31, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Some died in 1918 on a French battlefield. Some returned home to eastern Pennsylvania. But all the men of the American Expeditionary Forces' 314th Infantry, 79th Division, who fought in World War I's bloody Meuse-Argonne Offensive, are gone now. The memory of their courage and their sacrifice, kept alive since the Great War's end - first by the veterans themselves, then by the Descendants and Friends of the 314th - was honored Sunday at the Washington...
NEWS
May 15, 2016
The Summer Before the War By Helen Simonson Random House. 473 pp. $28 Reviewed by Katherine Bailey Fans of Helen Simonson's 2010 debut novel, Major Pettigrew's Last Stand , and readers who enjoy fiction steeped in Downton Abbey ambience will delight in The Summer Before the War . Set in the small coastal town of Rye in Sussex during the Great War, the book offers vivid description of town and country...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2016
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Permanent Collection. Learning to See. $225-$250. Opening Party for Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation & Change. $25. 2/20. 6-9 pm. Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation & Change. $14; $29, $27 seniors, $15 students and children includes collection admission.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Sacco's new book is an epic comic that depicts the horror of trench warfare during World War I. It's an accordion-style volume that opens into a single 24-foot-long panoramic drawing. Called The Great War: July 1, 1916, The First Day of the Battle of the Somme (W.W. Norton, 54 pages, $35), its origins go back to the author and artist's boyhood in Australia. Sacco, who will read at the Free Library of Philadelphia Thursday night, was born on the island of Malta in the Mediterranean Sea. When he was an infant, his parents emigrated to Australia, where every April 25 is Anzac Day, commemorating the casualties suffered by Australian and New Zealand soldiers during the invasion of Gallipoli in WWI. "They sacrificed so much blood there that it really entered the Australian national psyche," says Sacco, 53, author of masterful books of empathetic war-zone comic journalism, including Palestine and Safe Area Gorazde . "When I was a boy, they would stop class and play stories about World War I servicemen," he says, talking from New York this week.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - The commemoration of this year's 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and subsequent events includes amenities that soldiers would have relished 150 years ago. A groomed path to the top of Little Round Top. Expanded cellphone coverage. Dozens of portable toilets. The National Park Service and a cadre of community organizers were well-prepared for the commemoration of the pivotal battle of the American Civil War that cemented this small Pennsylvania town's place in U.S history.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
By Grant Calder Reading Woodrow Wilson's 1917 war message to Congress in our American history class reminded my students and me of the ongoing debate over the use of drones by the American government to target suspected terrorists. In the early 20th century, submarines were useful primarily as hit-and-run weapons. They would sneak up on much bigger ships and hope to remain undetected long enough to launch a torpedo or two and get away. In his speech to Congress, the president expressed his outrage at the German government's policy of using submarines to sink any vessels (many carried passengers and cargo)
TRAVEL
November 12, 2012 | By Michael Schuman, For The Inquirer
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A damaged war machine, officially known as a Renault FT-17 tank and commonly used by American forces during World War I, rests in retirement on a museum floor, still nursing its permanent wound in the shape of a gaping hole. A posted marker indicates that a German 77mm artillery piece, like one on view, was responsible. Nearby, visitors walk through a man-made crater, standing where a French farmhouse would have been had it not been struck by a 17-inch howitzer shell.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Michael Carroll
My father served in World War II. In his war, most everybody who could serve did. Dad returned with a Purple Heart to 40 mostly quiet years of small-town life. I remember as a child waking up to his warnings shouted to shipmates who never made it home after the kamikaze attack on his destroyer off Okinawa in April 1945. Like many veterans of his generation, he sealed away memories and did not examine them again until decades later, when surviving crew members reunited and told stories of young sailors, the ones who grew old and the ones who never had the chance.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Chris Gibbons
"I resolved to find what remained of Company D for (my grandfather), and for (his fellow soldiers), and for myself, as well, and complete a story begun on a hot July day so long ago, when young men raced across open fields toward machine guns and disappeared into history. " — From "The Remains of Company D: A Story of the Great War" by James Carl Nelson   As I recently walked down the first-floor hallway of my old high school, located at Broad and Vine, my footsteps sharply echoed off the walls, a stark reminder that it was late afternoon and that I was alone in the normally bustling, but now deserted, corridors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | byline w
A Who's Who guide to the quasi-historical world of HBO's "Boardwalk Empire": ENOCH "NUCKY" THOMPSON Nucky (Steve Buscemi), a character based on longtime Atlantic City Republican boss Enoch "Nucky" Johnson, is a charming widower with a wandering eye, a jealous mistress and a vision of what the resort town he rules could become with the advent of Prohibition: a place where vacationers willing to pay almost anything for a drink will flock to do...
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