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NEWS
March 26, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER TRAVEL EDITOR
People take tours to learn about something they haven't seen before, in an organized way with guides who - we all hope - know what they're talking about. I took a tour for the opposite reason: I wanted to learn something about places I see all the time. I go to a lot of live theater, and not just for the shows. I like the feel of being in a theater even when the curtain has yet to go up, when people come together for an evening full of possibilities, when the lights go down and expectations go up along with the curtain.
NEWS
July 23, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
For decades after Walt Disney's huge gamble on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs paid off in 1937, his studio hoarded its animated treasures and rereleased them only every seven years in order to capture each new generation of children. The arrival of video altered that strategy, opening up a new market that brings in once undreamed-of profits from films such as The Lion King and The Little Mermaid. But even a man of Disney's vision surely never dreamed his studio would find yet another path to riches by transforming movie megahits into lavish theatrical musicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1991 | By Clifford A. Ridley, Inquirer Theater Critic
By the theatrical industry's official measurement, which decrees that each Broadway season shall begin on June 1, we're almost halfway through the season of 1991-92. If it looks quite a lot like the paltry season of 1990-91 - if, indeed, it looks like a campaign in which scarcely a shot has been fired - that is how Broadway operates these days. As of today, six 1991-92 Broadway productions have opened - three of them courtesy of the nonprofit institutions that are becoming increasingly major players in and around Times Square.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
At a time when the average person can almost taste retirement, comedian/ activist/diet guru Dick Gregory is getting back to basics - standing flat- footed in front of a room full of expectant faces, digging for the laugh. "I was a little leery at first, because nobody likes to embarrass themselves," said the slim, 63-year-old vegetarian, "but I am better now than I was before. Not because of me, but because of the vast amounts of information that's out here. " Even though it's been 20 years since Gregory quit the club circuit - "I finally saw the conflict of telling young folks that drugs and alcohol were bad for them, and then telling them to come to the club and catch my act and exposing them to whiskey" - he's looking forward to getting back into the grind.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | By Sam Wood, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
He is definitely not hip. Never has been. Never will be. As a singer he'll never touch Sinatra, Bennett or Torme. And songwriters Andrew Lloyd Webber and Stephen Sondheim certainly don't have to regard him as major competition. But don't underestimate Barry Manilow. He raised the curtain Friday night at the Mark G. Etess Arena in Atlantic City for two evenings of "Showstoppers," a revue of seldom-heard show tunes and his own radically reworked songs. Engaging and sincere - all charm, no smarm - Manilow paid homage to the golden age of pop and vaudeville.
SPORTS
October 28, 2009 | By Phil Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New York had an A-list celebrity quarterback who led his football team to the Super Bowl title. His nickname was Broadway Joe. Philadelphia had a rough-and-tumble hockey team that won back-to-back Stanley Cup championships. Its nickname was the Broad Street Bullies. The towns and their teams sometimes seem reflected by their main thoroughfares. Joe Namath led the New York Jets to victory in Super Bowl III, in 1969. The hard-hitting Flyers won Stanley Cup titles in 1974 and '75. New York's Broadway is bright lights and big-city glamour.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1994 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back in the early '80s, Julie Miller was the toast of Atlantic City, a genuine local star. The woman from Wenatchee, Wash., made her Jersey Shore debut in a Greg Thompson production called Broadway Follies at the Golden Nugget Casino/Hotel (now the Grand) in 1982. Then came a sequel, Boardwalk Follies. When that closed, Miller joined Joe Namath for a production of Sugar at the Claridge Hotel & Casino. Along the way, Miller was named Atlantic City Entertainer of the Year.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Broadway. The name conjures up images of lights, crowds, Tony-award-winning musicals, and tourists - lots of tourists. And then there's the Broadway that runs from Brooklawn to Camden, right through the heart of Gloucester City. This port city's main commercial strip, home to diverse businesses from professional offices to appliance stores, does not have quite the same vitality as the Great White Way. Time, and the move from corner shop to the superstore, has left Broadway rough around the edges.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
A Frenchman who set out to swim the Atlantic 71 days ago completed his marathon 3,400-mile journey Friday. Benoit Lecomte, 31, who began his swim from the sandy beaches of Hyannis, Mass., came ashore on the rugged Brittany coast near the town of Quiberon. Lecomte became the first person to swim across the Atlantic without assistance from support devices, said his publicist, Colleen Turner. Wearing a wet suit, fins and a specially designed snorkel, the 5-foot-9, 151-pound marketing executive swam six to eight hours a day in two-hour blocks, stopping to eat and rest in a 40-foot boat that accompanied him. SCHOOL DAZE Madonna has denied a widely circulated report that she put her 2-year-old daughter, Lourdes, on the waiting list of one of Britain's most exclusive boarding schools.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer The New York Post and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
It wasn't exactly a food fight at Elaine's in New York Monday night, when more than the kitchen got fired up. Elaine herself bounced talkster Geraldo Rivera by handing him his check after he mouthed off to New York Newsday columnist Michael Shain, who had suggestively questioned, in print, Geraldo's late-night meeting - rather than during normal biz hours - with Denise Brown, sister of Nicole Simpson. It really got ugly when Geraldo, dining at a back table with his wife CeCe, screamed that he hated the writer and his paper, and made like a boxer, challenging Shain to a good old-fashioned duking out. Tantrum witnesses - including Oliver Stone, Alec Baldwin and wife Kim Basinger, Shain's wife and stepson - say that Geraldo was as upset by Shain's reporting that the Brown family was selling family photos to supermarket tabs as he was about the implied adultery.
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NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE rarely leads with Broadway news, but six-time Tony Award-winner Audra  McDonald is returning to Broadway a year from now and the Great White Way will be a little less white. Producer Scott Rudin said yesterday that Audra will star next March in a show that looks at the making of the 1921 hit "Shuffle Along," one of the first Broadway musicals to be written and directed by African-Americans. The show - to be called "Shuffle Along, Or, The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed" - will have a story by George C. Wolfe and be choreographed by Savion Glover . The duo last worked together on the 1996 hit "Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk.
NEWS
February 20, 2015
IN MAGIC, the act of turning an object into a completely different thing is known as "transformation. " But recently, it was conjurer Jeff Hobson who was altered in a significant way. Hobson is one of seven wizards who on Tuesday begin a six-day, eight-performance run in "The Illusionists" at the Academy of Music. They're on a national tour, following a successful end-of-2014 Broadway run. According to the veteran entertainer, his time in the Big Apple made him see the city in an entirely new light.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yo, Paulie, I hope this don't sound crazy or nothing, but I think I feel a song coming on. In the strangest pop crossover since Jerry Springer: The Opera, Rocky , the saga of the stumblebum boxer from Philadelphia, will open this week on the Great White Way. As a musical. But what brought this ungainly adaptation about? And why now - 38 years after the first film debuted? The project owes its life to the stubborn persistence of Sylvester Stallone, the creator and on-screen alter ego of Rocky Balboa.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
TO HEAR Marilu Henner tell it, for her, "The Tale of the Allergist's Wife" isn't so much a theatrical endeavor as it is a live-action reality-TV show. In the Charles Busch comedy that runs through Sept. 1 at the Bucks County Playhouse, Henner - whose formidable resume includes long-running stints in the sitcoms "Taxi" and "Evening Shade" (opposite Burt Reynolds), as well as a Playbill full of Broadway and national-tour gigs - plays Lee, a free spirit who decides that her best friend, Marjorie (played by four-time Oscar-nominee Marsha Mason )
NEWS
June 3, 2013
By Steve Young A story that has sailed under the "who is the latest professional outing himself" radar is perhaps the biggest-ever coming-out buzz on Broadway. Barry Goldberg, a backup dancer and singer on the Great White Way, has revealed that he is heterosexual, shattering one of the last great barriers in professional musical theater. "I'm a 29-year-old Broadway dancer. I'm Jewish and I'm straight," said Goldberg, who recently completed previews with The Electric Ms. El , the upcoming disco musical based on the life of the late first lady and U.N. ambassador Eleanor Roosevelt.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
TO A CERTAIN segment of the population, Tom Wopat will forever be "Luke Duke," one of the lead characters on the 1980s TV series, "The Dukes of Hazzard," which focused on the comical misadventures of a couple of reformed redneck moonshiners. But Wopat's greatest triumphs have occurred about as far - philosophically and artistically - as you can get from formulaic weekly television. For decades, the 61-year-old actor-singer has been a Broadway mainstay, in a slew of hit musicals and dramas.
TRAVEL
January 6, 2013 | By Andrea Sachs, Washington Post
NEW YORK - On a walking tour of Times Square, something supercalifragilisticexpialidocious happened. With the guide at my side, I was strolling along the streets without causing any casualties. No banging into clumps of tourists or wiping small children off my shoe. It was as if the guide, a Mary Poppins in a Yankees cap, had cast a spell, clearing the Great White Way for our party of two. Each day, 370,000 people parachute into Times Square. The pedestrian speed limit is snail-crawling-in-molasses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
BROADWAY MUSICALS run in packs. This time last year, several were rocking the house - "American Idiot," "Million Dollar Quartet," "Fela," and "Memphis. " (And the latter plays here this week in a closed-circuit video version; see sidebar.) This spring on Broadway, "high-stepping" song and dance spectacles are busting out all over again. But the attitude flaunted in "The Book of Mormon," "Priscilla Queen of the Desert" and "Catch Me If You Can" is fresh and just a little wicked.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010
JUST BECAUSE Seth Rudetsky has had, by his own admission, a lifelong "obsession" with musical theater doesn't mean he is blind to its faults, follies and foibles. If he were, he most likely wouldn't be coming to Trump Taj Mahal's Xanadu showroom tomorrow for a presentation of "Seth Rudetsky's Big Fat Broadway. " The show, which shares the name of Rudetsky's daily Broadway music program on Sirius-XM satellite radio, is hardly another tribute to the classic sounds of the Great White Way. Instead, it is a tongue-in-cheek look at the less-impressive side of musical theater and those who make their living in it. Typical of Rudetsky's sacred cow butchering is his examination of Barbra Streisand's predilection for capriciously - and hilariously - changing consonants in words she sings (for example, in "Coronet Man" from the original "Funny Girl" cast album, Babs turns the word "mute" into "mule")
SPORTS
October 28, 2009 | By Phil Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New York had an A-list celebrity quarterback who led his football team to the Super Bowl title. His nickname was Broadway Joe. Philadelphia had a rough-and-tumble hockey team that won back-to-back Stanley Cup championships. Its nickname was the Broad Street Bullies. The towns and their teams sometimes seem reflected by their main thoroughfares. Joe Namath led the New York Jets to victory in Super Bowl III, in 1969. The hard-hitting Flyers won Stanley Cup titles in 1974 and '75. New York's Broadway is bright lights and big-city glamour.
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