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Greco Roman

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NEWS
October 8, 1988 | By Calvin Trillin
The question is this: Am I going to start paying some serious attention to Greco-Roman wrestling, or am I going to let my country down? That's also your choice. Sure, you can go about your business for the next four years, completely putting Greco-Roman wrestling out of your mind. That's what you did after the 1984 Olympics, isn't it? Let's be honest about it: That's exactly what you did. When the 1988 Olympics finally rolled around, you realized that you had forgotten whatever you'd learned about Greco-Roman wrestling from the ABC announcer during the 1984 games.
SPORTS
March 18, 2011 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com
The referees wore suits, with ties, and the wrestlers didn't wear headgear. Everyone used the metric system. Welcome to freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling, the only kind there is on an international level, and the only way for American grapplers to medal in the Olympics. Collegiate wrestling, the kind taking place this weekend during the NCAA Division I finals at the Wells Fargo Center, is often called "folkstyle" and isn't popular outside the United States. "No, we never wrestled like this, but wrestling has many personalities," said Mohamed Abdelfatah, who wrestled in the Olympics for his native Egypt twice.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | By Brian Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Harriton senior Bryan Focht has caught many an opponent with a martial arts move that he learned through his experiences with somba wrestling. He's used upper-body holds that he learned from his Greco-Roman tournament matches. He has surprised opponents with one of his many freestyle moves. And he has done all that against wrestlers from different countries - and in different countries. Focht gained considerable international experience competing in the Somba World Championships in Canterbury, England in November 1992, and gained plenty of national experience in the United States, having wrestled at the Junior Olympics in Minnesota last summer and the national championships in Amarillo, Texas, a few weeks later.
SPORTS
July 29, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back home in Minnesota, he is a full-time chiropractor. Over in Japan, his identical twin is a part-time professional wrestler. Here last night, in defeat, a 32-year-old, square-jawed mug named Dennis Koslowski became the most successful American in history in one of the Olympics' less glamorous sports. His silver medal in Greco-Roman wrestling - 220-pound division - was the best performance ever by an American in a year when the nations that traditionally dominate the sport did not stay away.
SPORTS
September 13, 1988 | By Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
Last year, the Minnesota Twins proved they could win a World Series. Now the question is: Can the Minnesota twins win an Olympic gold medal in Greco-Roman wrestling? No, we're not talking about Kent Hrbek and Kirby Puckett, although they do look a bit like wrestlers. These Minnesota twins are named Koslowski, Dennis and Duane, and they will represent the United States in the 100- and 130-kilogram weight classes at the upcoming Summer Games. They even have matching T-shirts that identify them as the "Seoul Brothers.
SPORTS
October 25, 2012 | Daily News staff and wire reports
JEFF BLATNICK, who overcame cancer to win a gold medal in Greco-Roman wrestling at the 1984 Summer Olympics and went on to a career as a sports commentator and motivational speaker, died Wednesday in New York state at age 55. Officials at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, N.Y., said he died there of heart failure. Blatnick was a high school state champion in suburban Albany in the mid-1970s and was a two-time Division II national champion and three-time Division II All-American at Springfield College in Massachusetts.
SPORTS
July 4, 1988 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is a sport that is not recognized on the American collegiate level. A sport that even the U.S. Olympic coach concedes includes only 100 or so qualified American athletes. So why is Pavel Katsen, the U.S. Olympic Greco-Roman wrestling coach, predicting two individual American medals later this year in Seoul? "The athletes in the U.S. are better," said Katsen, who coached Mike Houck, a 198-pounder, to the 1985 world championship in Greco-Roman wrestling, in which holds below the waist and the use of legs for holds are barred.
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Wrestling fans who took in the West Chester East Invitational on Saturday got a special bonus this year, an opportunity to see both the present and possibly the future of national-caliber private-school wrestling. The present was represented by the Hill School's Zach Doll, a 160-pound senior who is a three-time National Prep School Tournament finalist, a former Cadet National Freestyle finalist, and one of the leading contenders for the Plienis Award, given annually to the most dominant prep wrestler in the country.
SPORTS
July 24, 1996 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is how it is when you walk to the mat and face Alexander Karelin, the great Russian super-heavyweight wrestler in the Greco-Roman discipline. "I went out hoping I would last three minutes against the guy," Panagiotis Pikilidis said yesterday morning. "I believe I was successful. " Almost. Pikilidis, from Greece, lasted 2 minutes, 59 seconds before Karelin pinned him in a gut wrench move, and the name of that move is all you need to know about Greco-Roman wrestling. You can't use your feet or your legs, only your arms, and if you're really strong and really mean, you go for the gut and squeeze.
SPORTS
July 28, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The United States' two brightest college baseball stars saved their country from a costly Olympic loss yesterday. Team USA blew a three-run lead before rallying to beat Taiwan, 10-9, and keep pace with unbeaten Cuba. Jeffrey Hammonds singled home the tying run with two out in the fifth, and Phil Nevin followed with a decisive two-run double that sent Team USA on its way. Nevin also homered to start a three-run seventh inning that pushed the lead to 10-6. It was barely enough for the United States' undependable bullpen, which gave up five walks, three hits and four runs in 3 1/3 innings.
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SPORTS
February 18, 2013 | By Jason Nark, Daily News Staff Writer
THE NFL is canceling the Super Bowl in 2014 in favor of competitive croquet, and the league's best teams will have to settle for conference championships instead. You're laughing, but please try to imagine it. Understand what wrestlers from Iowa to Azerbaijan are going through right now: the shock, disbelief, anger, because their Super Bowl, the Summer Olympic Games, is in jeopardy. The International Olympic Committee, the overlords of the games, voted to recommend that freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling - arguably the world's oldest and purest form of sport - be dropped from the 2020 Olympics for reasons that so far appear unclear.
SPORTS
February 14, 2013 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF AND ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rob Eiter was shocked when he heard the news. International Olympic Committee leaders dropped wrestling from the Olympic program on Tuesday in a surprise decision that removes one of the oldest Olympic sports from the 2020 Games. "It literally came from left field," said Eiter, a former U.S. Olympic wrestler and the fifth-year head wrestling coach at Penn. "It still hasn't really sunk in, to be honest. " The IOC executive board decided to retain modern pentathlon - the event considered most at risk - and remove wrestling instead from its list of 25 "core sports.
SPORTS
October 25, 2012 | Daily News staff and wire reports
JEFF BLATNICK, who overcame cancer to win a gold medal in Greco-Roman wrestling at the 1984 Summer Olympics and went on to a career as a sports commentator and motivational speaker, died Wednesday in New York state at age 55. Officials at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, N.Y., said he died there of heart failure. Blatnick was a high school state champion in suburban Albany in the mid-1970s and was a two-time Division II national champion and three-time Division II All-American at Springfield College in Massachusetts.
SPORTS
August 8, 2012 | By AUDREY SNYDER and For the Daily News
LONDON — Jordan Burroughs already mapped out the fastest route from the wrestling mat through the ExCel Arena stands, where he plans to hug his parents after winning a gold medal on Friday. As Burroughs continued checking the U.S. Greco-Roman wrestlers' results online during the past week, the reigning 74kg world champion freestyle wrestler said he's ready to have the gold medal placed around his neck. He's already stated the rules: No one will be allowed to touch it and he's never going to take it off. The former Sicklerville, N.J., prep star smiled at reporters before Tuesday's practice and said he's never felt more at ease before a competition than now. The sleepless nights he had before the Olympic Trials while he stayed up watching film and listening to music are behind him. After returning from a weeklong training trip in Belarus with his teammates, Burroughs is champing at the bit for Friday's Olympic debut.
SPORTS
March 18, 2011 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com
The referees wore suits, with ties, and the wrestlers didn't wear headgear. Everyone used the metric system. Welcome to freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling, the only kind there is on an international level, and the only way for American grapplers to medal in the Olympics. Collegiate wrestling, the kind taking place this weekend during the NCAA Division I finals at the Wells Fargo Center, is often called "folkstyle" and isn't popular outside the United States. "No, we never wrestled like this, but wrestling has many personalities," said Mohamed Abdelfatah, who wrestled in the Olympics for his native Egypt twice.
SPORTS
September 29, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Rulon Gardner now has some company when it comes to wrestling upsets at the Sydney Olympics. A day after Gardner beat the legendary Aleksandr Karelin in the Greco-Roman super-heavyweight finals, Brandon Slay upset Russia's Bouvaissa Saitiev, 4-3, in overtime and survived a protest by Russian officials to advance in freestyle wrestling. Saitiev, the defending Olympic gold medalist, is a four-time world champion whom many consider the best amateur wrestler in the world. "I can't let any of this go to my head," said Slay, 24, a graduate of Penn's Wharton School of Business from Amarillo, Texas.
SPORTS
June 22, 2000 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the fading, snapshot images that remain from the Atlanta Olympics, the mind's eye can still recall Kerri Strug landing the vault on her throbbing ankle, Michael Johnson triumphantly coasting into his victory laps with arms outstretched, and Matt Ghaffari crying uncontrollably on the victory podium, a silver medal around his neck as heavy as an anvil. Nothing stands still, least of all time, but four years later Ghaffari is once again trying to climb the final step of that podium.
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Wrestling fans who took in the West Chester East Invitational on Saturday got a special bonus this year, an opportunity to see both the present and possibly the future of national-caliber private-school wrestling. The present was represented by the Hill School's Zach Doll, a 160-pound senior who is a three-time National Prep School Tournament finalist, a former Cadet National Freestyle finalist, and one of the leading contenders for the Plienis Award, given annually to the most dominant prep wrestler in the country.
SPORTS
July 24, 1996 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is how it is when you walk to the mat and face Alexander Karelin, the great Russian super-heavyweight wrestler in the Greco-Roman discipline. "I went out hoping I would last three minutes against the guy," Panagiotis Pikilidis said yesterday morning. "I believe I was successful. " Almost. Pikilidis, from Greece, lasted 2 minutes, 59 seconds before Karelin pinned him in a gut wrench move, and the name of that move is all you need to know about Greco-Roman wrestling. You can't use your feet or your legs, only your arms, and if you're really strong and really mean, you go for the gut and squeeze.
SPORTS
March 2, 1995 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Penn has a wrestling tradition that goes back to the very first collegiate match, in 1906. But that wasn't on Brandon Slay's mind when he showed up for a visit as a high school all-American from Amarillo, Texas. Slay was used to the open plains of the Texas Panhandle. The ride from Philadelphia International Airport to Penn's campus seemed like a journey through an industrial theme park: all oil tanks, junkyards, and stacks spilling smoke and fire. Slay hoped the car he was riding in could withstand all the potholes.
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