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NEWS
April 2, 1990 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/ DAILY NEWS
Center City took on aspects of Athens yesterday for a celebration of Greek Independence Day with a parade that included guards of the Royal Army (far left), and a float from Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church with Debbie Kiziriglou, 17, and Alex Varkados, 22, portraying the Virgin Mary and the angel Gabriel. A wreath-laying at the Liberty Bell by state Supreme Court Justice Nicholas P. Papadakos also marked the 169th anniversary of the struggle that ended Greece's domination by the Turks.
NEWS
May 15, 2012
Concerns grew that Greece's departure from the euro was near. Yet there were also hints that a new phase of talks with European lenders could begin. A3.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Elena Becatoros and Demetris Nellas, Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece - Greece was in turmoil and the world economy in limbo Thursday as political brinkmanship in Athens led Prime Minister George Papandreou to abandon his explosive plan to put a European rescue deal to a referendum. The developments overshadowed the G20 summit of world leaders in the French resort of Cannes, where President Obama implored European leaders to work out a eurozone plan quickly to deal with the continent's crisis, which threatens to push the world back into recession.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Demetris Nellas, Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece - Greeks took to the streets by the tens of thousands on Saturday to commemorate the 39th anniversary of a deadly student uprising against the country's former dictatorship. While the marches went on peacefully, clashes between anarchists and police erupted briefly in the capital, Athens and Greece's second-largest city of Thessaloniki, in both cases far from where the marches took place. Police announced they detained 70 people in Athens and 19 in Thessaloniki. With more than 6,000 police deployed in the city center, protesters marched from the National Technical University of Athens, where the 1973 uprising kicked off, to the U.S. Embassy.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Nicholas Paphitis, Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece - Hopes rose slightly Thursday that Greece could end its post-electoral deadlock without having to hold new elections, as international partners warned that Athens must stick to its hugely unpopular austerity program or abandon the euro. Socialist leader Evangelos Venizelos, who received the presidential mandate to try and form a government after two other party chiefs failed, said a meeting Thursday with a left-wing potential kingmaker had proved encouraging. If this third mandate fails, President Karolos Papoulias will convene party leaders in a last-ditch effort to get a deal - otherwise new elections will be held in a month.
SPORTS
September 6, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
After the snub of 1996, the Olympics are returning to their Greek birthplace in 2004. Athens was awarded the first Summer Games of the new millennium yesterday, bringing the Olympics to the Greek capital for the first time since the modern games began in 1896. "We're giving back to the Greeks what they gave to us," International Olympic Committee member Jacques Rogge said. "The extra value of the Greek tradition made the difference. " The decision set off celebrations in the streets of Athens, where young people linked arms in traditional Greek dances near the Acropolis and motorists honked in joy. Some of the jubilant Athenians said the decision was a sweet payback for Greece's devastating loss to Atlanta for the 1996 Centennial Games.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
ATHENS, Greece - Greece has faced down street violence and strikes for the sake of financial aid it was promised and needs to avoid bankruptcy. Now its fellow European countries will be expected to come up with a second rescue package to convince investors that the 17-nation euro will survive the debt crisis. A new austerity package that lawmakers cleared in Athens is required to get more rescue loans but will force deep changes on all parts of society. Minimum wages will be taxed more and key assets like water, gas and oil companies will be sold, possibly to foreigners.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is a wall map of Greece beside Paul Kotrotsios' desk. A colored pushpin marks the city of Yiannena, which once was his home, just as other pushpins mark the former homes of other employees of the Greek Radio Network of America, based in Media. The red pin stuck into the southern city of Kalamata is there for a different reason: It marks disaster. Ever since Sept. 13, when an earthquake measuring 6.2 on the Richter scale severely damaged the seaside city, the cable radio station has directed its efforts toward relieving the town's distress.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Her husband was asked about "closure" - that amorphous, almost unemotional term psychologists use to describe the process of healing a terrible wound. "There's not going to be closure on this," said Timothy Nist, the heartbroken ex-husband of dismembered model Julie Marie Scully. "Not for any of us - not for the rest of our lives. " Instead, Nist and the Scully family and the once-happy couple's 3-year-old daughter will have to settle for the best a murder victim's kin can hope - a measure of justice.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2012 | By Nicholas Paphitis and Juergen Baetz, Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece - Greece's euro partners won't be able to release the country's next batch of bailout cash next week, even though the Greek Parliament narrowly backed more unpopular austerity measures Thursday. Germany's finance minister, Wolfgang Schaeuble, said the 17-country eurozone is not yet in a position to make a decision on releasing the funds, as many in Athens may have hoped. As anticipated, the cash-strapped country still has to pass its budget for 2013, while lawmakers in some countries, including Germany, have to authorize the release of funds.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Nicholas K. Gonatas, 84, Philadelphia pathologist, researcher and founder of the Division of Neuropathology at the University of Pennsylvania died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday, Oct. 7. Born March 15, 1930, Dr. Gonatas was raised in Thessaloniki, Greece, capital of the province of Macedonia. His son Dinos recalls stories his father told about living through the Nazi occupation of Greece between 1941 and 1944, including leaving home to live on the island of Euboea. "And they had no electricity.
SPORTS
June 5, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vincent Enyeama batted Greek forward Georgios Samaras' shot from the left side of the box into the air. The rebound went straight to forward Dimitris Salpingidis, who attempted a header in the 83d minute of the pre-World Cup friendly between Nigeria and Greece at PPL Park. This time, Enyeama, the Nigerian goalkeeper, leaped and caught the attempt, preserving a scoreless game. Defense and goalkeeping controlled the game in a 0-0 draw played in front of a largely pro-Greece crowd of 10,131 fans at the Chester stadium.
SPORTS
June 5, 2014 | BY TYLER TYNES, Daily News Staff Writer tynest@phillynews.com
BEFORE NIGERIA could deliver the opening kick last night in an international friendly with Greece, the players carried a stronger message before the singing of their national anthem. Each player was accompanied by a child at midfield with a white sign reading, in part, "#BringBackOurGirls," a reminder of the more than 300 schoolgirls who were kidnapped from the Chibok Government Secondary School by Boko Haram terrorists in Nigeria in April. About 272 are still missing. But this wasn't a planned form of activism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* A DAY LATE AND A DOLLAR SHORT. 8 p.m. Saturday, Lifetime.   "DYING matriarch" might not sound like a dream role for an actress in her 50s, but Whoopi Goldberg's not complaining. "The View" co-host stars in Lifetime's adaptation of Terry McMillan's A Day Late and a Dollar Short , in which she's playing Viola Price, who, on learning that her next asthma attack will probably be her last, decides that it's time to straighten out her muddled family, which includes a straying husband (Ving Rhames)
SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | By Rick O, Inquirer Columnist
Westtown's Georgios Papagiannis was a shot-blocking machine Tuesday evening against Academy of the New Church. And, understandably, ANC coach Kevin Givens grew frustrated. "When you have someone 7-foot-1 in there, you have to stop and take a pull-up shot," Givens said. "You can't keep doing the same thing and expect a different result. " Papagiannis, a junior center who came to Westtown from Greece in September, rejected nine field-goal attempts as the host Moose stormed past the Lions, 65-39, and captured the Friends Schools League boys' basketball title.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas A. Kefalides, 86, of Merion, a physician, a groundbreaking scientist, and an educator, died Friday, Dec. 6, at his home from complications of pulmonary fibrosis. Dr. Kefalides was emeritus professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and remained active until his final days as a member of the medical school's admissions committee. In 1970, he began what would become a 43-year career at Penn and a high-profile role as a pioneer in the study of the extracellular matrix - components of the body that fill the space between structured cells.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seth Berger probably had to pinch himself - and more than once. In January, a man from Greece called Westtown and inquired about visiting the Quaker school with his then-15-year-old son and possibly enrolling him for the fall semester. The prospective student just happened to be Georgios Papagiannis, a 7-foot-1, 240-pound center who many, including Berger, believe could be a first-round selection - maybe even a lottery pick - in the 2016 NBA draft. Word spread in the spring that the wunderkind, who at 14 drew NBA scouts to a Greek Basket League game, was indeed coming to the United States.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Columnist
For a kid who grew up along the trolley tracks just outside of West Philadelphia, it's amazing how a few olive trees in Greece can always bring tears to my eyes. It happened again in September, as I said goodbye to my mother's farmer-sister, set to walk across the village of Asopos, and turned that first corner where, eventually, she and all the others were no longer in view. Because, for the last two decades, here is how it has gone down every time I've hit that corner: I realize the time with family is over.
TRAVEL
September 22, 2013 | By Spyros Stavrakas, For The Inquirer
I enjoy travel literature for many reasons: At its best, it educates and entertains, and it also has occasionally influenced my travel choices. One of the 20th century's most celebrated practitioners was Sir Patrick Leigh Fermor, who, after many years traveling in Greece, chose Kardamyli, in the southern Peloponnesus, as his Greek home. I had learned about Kardamyli from Fermor's book Mani: Travels in the Southern Peloponnese. His home became a mecca for friends and fellow authors who visited him to enjoy good conversation, food, and the area's physical beauty.
SPORTS
September 6, 2013
TAY JONES, Saint Joseph's leading scorer the last three seasons, is going to play professionally in Poland. His season begins in October. C.J. Aiken, who left after his junior season with 319 blocked shots, has been invited to training camp with the Sacramento Kings. SJU has three other former players who will be continuing their careers overseas during the upcoming season. Darrin Govens, who played last season in Israel, is going to Greece. Pat Calathes, who had played in Greece and Israel, will be playing in Kazakstan.
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