CollectionsGreed
IN THE NEWS

Greed

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 18, 1986
I reply to the Sept. 10 article "Lavin's hardest thing: Thinking about his family. " I hope everyone reads it - especially those on drugs, selling them or contemplating selling drugs. There is only one adjective for Larry Lavin - greedy. I am sorry for his children, only because they will have to deal with the fact that their father is a convict and in jail. I am sorry for his wife, who obviously was too weak to leave him, or cared for him too much, or didn't think far enough in the future for herself or her children.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
While Oliver Stone's Wall Street is not the inside dope on insider trading, it is a brazenly entertaining melodrama, festering with greed, bilious with revenge and positively reeking with the sour stench of success. As if we could fail to note the attributes of his principals, Stone christens his predatory characters Fox and Gekko, after the barnyard raider and the insect-devouring lizard. Charlie Sheen may disappoint as Bud Fox, but Michael Douglas (in his Oscar-winning role) is a standout as Gordon Gekko, a man described as having had "an ethical bypass at birth.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Leo Lamer and Murray Abramowitz, both World War II veterans, had much in common - including, they both admitted yesterday, greed. After the war, both got jobs at a federal agency in South Philadelphia that buys clothing for the military. And at some point in their civilian careers, both admittedly went on the take. In an agency where corruption was flourishing, they admitted stuffing their own pockets with thousands of dollars in payoffs from businessmen who were getting multimillion-dollar clothing-supply contracts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From his debut with The Maltese Falcon to later masterworks such as The Man Who Would Be King and Prizzi's Honor, John Huston had an enduring fascination with greed and what it does to the soul. His The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is one of the definitive statements on the theme. Huston wanted to film the B. Traven novel in 1941, but he had to wait until after the war. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre follows the fate and the falling out of three drifters who go to Mexico to prospect for gold.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | By JAMES J. TREIRES
With carefully selected statistics and unsupported generalizations, David A. Ridenour ("Reagan years of 'greed' paid off," Commentary Page, Sept. 21) tries to convince us that the policies of Ronald Reagan were wonderful medicine for the U.S. economy. He claims that what the media often criticize as a "Decade of Greed" actually "fueled seven straight years of economic expansion in the 1980s and improved the lives of most Americans. " A rediscovered Invisible Hand miraculously transformed the greed of yuppies and corporate raiders into unprecedented prosperity for all. As an economist who has tracked the interactions between federal economic policy and trends in production and employment for more than three decades, I must ask, where has this man been?
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A suburban Philadelphia businessman testified in federal court yesterday that he and a partner rigged nationwide sweepstakes contests sponsored by major companies and stole grand prizes worth more than $300,000. Steven B. Gross testified that he and fellow promoter Charles B. "Chuck" Seidman acted out of "greed and stupidity" in swindling contest sponsors Alpo Pet Food Inc., Georgia Pacific and the Trump Plaza Hotel in Atlantic City, among others. "It's just a terrible mistake," added Gross, 39, of Narberth, who pleaded guilty to fraud charges last week and faces up to 10 years in prison.
NEWS
December 11, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"The China Syndrome" was released early in 1979, just weeks after the near-catastrophic accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant. As a result, there was great interest in the movie. "Wall Street," Oliver Stone's follow-up to his Oscar-winning "Platoon," comes barely a month after Black Monday, the worst single-day drop of the stock market in history, so you might expect it to be the beneficiary of a similar groundswell. The betting here is that it won't. For one thing, a meltdown is a much easier concept to grasp than greenmail, hostile takeovers, subordinated debt and the other rather arcane concepts that "Wall Street" deals with.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | By Melvin Maddocks
Greed is "out. " Perhaps you read it on the front page of the Wall Street Journal in an article declaring the latest personification of greed, the yuppie, was a vanishing species. Perhaps you read it in a cover story of Newsweek, complete with polls to prove that avarice - poor thing! - has suddenly become the least tempting vice. If you don't believe that greed is "out," and if you lack the patience to read all these edifying accounts of its fall from grace, go see the film Wall Street.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Michael Biesecker and Mitch Weiss, Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Hundreds marched Sunday through Charlotte's central business district ahead of the Democratic National Convention to protest corporate greed in a demonstration that was lively but smaller than organizers had touted. About 600 marchers carried signs and banners, banged drums, and chanted on a sunny afternoon as part of the March on Wall Street South. Their numbers were a fraction of the thousands that organizers expected for what had been planned as the week's biggest protest.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
A pack of avaricious wolves that has been circling Harrisburg is salivating to feed on the working poor with a bill that would legalize exploitative payday loans that could carry interest rates in the triple digits. Dressed in the clothing of consumer protection, the bill strips away Pennsylvania's long-held and strongly enforced protections against predatory short-term loans. Sponsored by Rep. Chris Ross (R., Chester), the legislation would drop-kick the state's 24 percent annual-percentage-rate cap. As a result, individuals with marginal incomes, including truck drivers, nurses, and clerks, could be pushed into a cycle of debt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012
Q: My husband's ex-wife always guilt-trips her daughter into going all out for her on her birthday and on Mother's Day. My stepdaughter gets a very small allowance, so her dad is the one who has to pay. I think this is his ex-wife's way of sticking it to my husband, above and beyond the hefty child support and alimony she already gets. I want to put a stop to this, but I don't want to be a wicked stepmother. Please respond quickly. I overhead my stepdaughter tell my husband that her mother wants a certain Michael Kors watch, and the thought of that going on the credit card we both pay for makes me want to scream.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
"GREED" drove Center City dentist Owen Rogal and his daughter Kim Rogal to defraud 15 insurance companies out of nearly $5 million from 2002 to 2011, District Attorney Seth Williams said yesterday. "This is a case that only happened because of greed," Williams said at a news conference. "He could have continued making a more comfortable living than probably 98 percent of all Americans as a dentist, but because he saw this as an opportunity, he took it. " Rogal, 71, owner of the Pain Center, on 12th Street near Lombard, and his daughter, his office manager, who lives in Delaware, surrendered yesterday and were charged with 15 counts of insurance fraud, 12 counts of theft by deception and related counts.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
It was as if Oliver Stone had written a Mitt Romney sound bite when this week the candidate was quoted as saying, "I like firing people. " After all, Stone directed Michael Douglas, as Gordon Gekko, saying similar things in the 1987 movie classic Wall Street . Men in their 40s and 50s still quote Gekko: "Lunch is for wimps"; "I create nothing. I own"; "What's worth doing is worth doing for money"; "If you're not inside, you're outside"; and of course, "Greed, for lack of a better word, is good.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
This, from the have-you-no-shame, you-got-some-nerve, just-go-away files. First up, the Queen of Greed, only because she just reared her vindictive head - again. When last we shipped off Arlene Ackerman, she had unapologetically pocketed a buyout package close to a cool $1 million. We thought we had seen the last of her. But, no. Like the Terminator, she's baaack. Seems the former school superintendent has further held up the cash-strapped district by applying for unemployment benefits.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Reity O’Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of Occupy Philly are outside the Rittenhouse Hotel in Center City, chanting "Where is Romney?," protesting Presidential candidate Mitt Romney's appearance late this afternoon at a fund-raiser for his campaign. The Romney event is being hosted by prominent attorney Charles Kopp of the politically wired Philadelphia law firm, Cozen O'Connor. While protestors had marched around the block to the 20th Street garage entrance to the hotel, Romney walked through Rittenhouse Square late this afternoon and went into the hotel through the front entrance.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
George Parry is a former federal and state prosecutor practicing law in Philadelphia I stopped by the Occupy Philadelphia jamboree last week to listen to the campers' concerns. In contrast to the unified, scripted message of the AstroTurf tea partyers, the occupiers expressed a wide variety of authentic and informed opinions about what ails our selfish, greed-driven society. Though their views were diverse, for many of the protesters, there seems to be a central cause animating their disaffection.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
They waved protest placards, they chanted slogans, they nibbled free gourmet pizza samples. The "occupation" phenomenon went suburban Thursday. About 150 aggrieved but well-scrubbed souls hit the sidewalks of Doylestown's busiest intersection in the late-afternoon drizzle, proclaiming solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement that has spread nationwide. Impassioned but orderly, the protesters waved signs that said, "Tax millionaires" and "Nov. 8 - Occupy the Voting Booth.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They waved protest placards, they chanted slogans, they nibbled free gourmet pizza samples. The "Occupy" phenomenon went suburban Thursday. About 150 aggrieved but well-scrubbed souls hit the sidewalks of Doylestown's busiest intersection in the late-afternoon drizzle, proclaiming solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement that has spread nationwide. Impassioned but orderly, the protesters waved signs such as "Tax Millionaires" and "Nov. 8 - Occupy the Voting Booth.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|