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Greek Culture

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NEWS
October 12, 1988 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
About 40,000 people enjoyed a sampling of Greek culture last weekend in Cherry Hill. Greek food, drink and music were in the spotlight at the 15th annual Greek Agora held Friday, Saturday and Sunday at St. Thomas Greek Orthodox Church, 615 Mercer St., Cherry Hill. About 200 volunteers prepared and worked at the festival, which included the serving of about 15,000 Greek meals and the cooking of about 15 whole lambs on spits, said the Rev. Emmanuel Pratsinakis, pastor of St. Thomas.
NEWS
January 19, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dressed in a hand-sewn foustanella with pom-poms shaking at the toes of his slippers, Constantinos Mitoulis led a snaking line of teenagers as they re-created the Syrtos, an ancient Cypriot dance. Described by Homer in The Odyssey, the Syrtos - a Greek dance done with quick, rhythmic steps to wailing fiddle music - has survived thousands of years. But Mitoulis and his fellow dancers are not Greek nationals; in fact, many call English their mother tongue and have never set foot in Athens or Salonika.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
WITH CLOTH AND CONCENTRATION, Cosmas Trifonidis, 11, turns his partner, Maria Malitas, 11, during a performance of a Greek folk dance at Penn's Landing. The dancers, from the Annunciation Greek Church in Elkins Park, celebrated Greek culture yesterday during the fifth annual Hellenic Festival, a gathering with traditional food, music and crafts.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The F. W. Holbein School in Mount Holly is becoming a culture club. Students will be sampling a smorgasbord from countries all over the world, one each month, thanks to a new $2,000 grant for the school. Betty Anne Davison, Holbein's fine-arts teacher, and Rose Lewis, a basic skills reading teacher, received a federal grant in December for the project. "Black History Month is kind of like Christmas Day," Davison said. "You open up the presents, and then everything's gone. I decided we should study a culture a month, starting with Black History Month, then the Greek culture, because there are some children with a Greek background in school.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
About 25,000 people from throughout the area ate, drank, danced and shared Greek culture at the Greek Agora 1987 held last weekend at Saint Thomas Greek Orthodox Church in Cherry Hill. As in the 13 Agoras before it, the 14th annual festival, held Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to midnight, drew Greeks and people of many other cultures to share Greek delicacies and traditions inside and outside the 22-year-old church on Mercer Street, according to Harry Kokolis, chairman of Greek Agora 1987.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2003 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In January, the Pennsylvania Economy League asked Manuel N. Stamatakis what he would do if he had $1 billion to invest in Philadelphia. It may be that he already has. From the return of shipbuilding to the city, to the two new stadiums under way, to the survival of MCP-Hahnemann Medical School, to the building of the National Constitution Center as well as the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, Stamatakis' hand has been in it all. ...
NEWS
October 10, 1987 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maria Exadaktilos, 12, wearing a fez and an embroidered blue velvet costume, was excited. Her brown eyes twinkled as she explained that she would be dancing the "Karagouna" that night - "the dance of the mountain" - at a dinner at St. Thomas Greek Orthodox Church in Cherry Hill. Maria, a Maple Shade resident, was one of hundreds of volunteer participants in the 14th Annual Greek Agora, a three-day festival at St. Thomas that drew hundreds of residents, as well as local officials, when it opened yesterday.
NEWS
January 19, 1997 | By Deborah Kong, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The World War II veteran and expert chef always rolled his wheelchair to the front row so he could see the altar boy who had become like a son to him. After services at St. Thomas Greek Orthodox Church, they chatted, the usual small talk. George H. Lambi asked the boy how he was and how school was going. When Lambi became sick and was confined to his bed, Stamatios Katsikis visited him at home. Earlier this month - more than two years after Lambi's death - his widow, Mary H. Lambi, presented Katsikis, now 18 and a freshman at Rutgers-New Brunswick, with a $1,000 scholarship.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aside from food, religion, philosophy, government, familial love, education, and a few million other things, the Greeks have offered the world very little. That's the slyly delivered take on his culture offered by George Horiates, an organizer of the annual Greek Agora Festival in Cherry Hill. A personal-injury attorney in Pennsauken, Horiates, 46, sat in a blue-and-white tent outside St. Thomas Greek Orthodox Church on Sunday, trying to explain Greek-ness to an outsider. "This culture at its base involves food," said Horiates, who lives in Moorestown.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Rev. Steven Vlahos became a Greek Orthodox priest, he expected his religious life to take the usual twists and turns. He didn't expect that 40 years later, he'd be sitting in a cubicle at the Camden County Store in Cherry Hill Mall. In four decades, his calling has taken him to Baltimore; Little Rock, Ark.; Rockford, Ill.; Bethesda, Md.; and Cherry Hill, where he is known for helping to start the annual Greek Agora in 1972. For the last 13 years, he has been a parish priest in North Wildwood, a part-time job in which he has doubled membership at St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church.
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NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aside from food, religion, philosophy, government, familial love, education, and a few million other things, the Greeks have offered the world very little. That's the slyly delivered take on his culture offered by George Horiates, an organizer of the annual Greek Agora Festival in Cherry Hill. A personal-injury attorney in Pennsauken, Horiates, 46, sat in a blue-and-white tent outside St. Thomas Greek Orthodox Church on Sunday, trying to explain Greek-ness to an outsider. "This culture at its base involves food," said Horiates, who lives in Moorestown.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Daniel Deagler
Like modern Israel, biblical Israel had many enemies. The average person today can conceptualize some of them - the Egyptians, for example - but based on the holy book, it's hard to distinguish among the Canaanites and Ammonites, the Hittites and Philistines. The Bible is not a history book, and certainly not one written by a disinterested third party. Enemies of the Israelites are presented as just that. But in the case of the conflict commemorated by Hanukkah, understanding the enemy involved can provide much insight.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Rev. Steven Vlahos became a Greek Orthodox priest, he expected his religious life to take the usual twists and turns. He didn't expect that 40 years later, he'd be sitting in a cubicle at the Camden County Store in Cherry Hill Mall. In four decades, his calling has taken him to Baltimore; Little Rock, Ark.; Rockford, Ill.; Bethesda, Md.; and Cherry Hill, where he is known for helping to start the annual Greek Agora in 1972. For the last 13 years, he has been a parish priest in North Wildwood, a part-time job in which he has doubled membership at St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2003 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In January, the Pennsylvania Economy League asked Manuel N. Stamatakis what he would do if he had $1 billion to invest in Philadelphia. It may be that he already has. From the return of shipbuilding to the city, to the two new stadiums under way, to the survival of MCP-Hahnemann Medical School, to the building of the National Constitution Center as well as the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, Stamatakis' hand has been in it all. ...
NEWS
January 19, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dressed in a hand-sewn foustanella with pom-poms shaking at the toes of his slippers, Constantinos Mitoulis led a snaking line of teenagers as they re-created the Syrtos, an ancient Cypriot dance. Described by Homer in The Odyssey, the Syrtos - a Greek dance done with quick, rhythmic steps to wailing fiddle music - has survived thousands of years. But Mitoulis and his fellow dancers are not Greek nationals; in fact, many call English their mother tongue and have never set foot in Athens or Salonika.
NEWS
January 19, 1997 | By Deborah Kong, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The World War II veteran and expert chef always rolled his wheelchair to the front row so he could see the altar boy who had become like a son to him. After services at St. Thomas Greek Orthodox Church, they chatted, the usual small talk. George H. Lambi asked the boy how he was and how school was going. When Lambi became sick and was confined to his bed, Stamatios Katsikis visited him at home. Earlier this month - more than two years after Lambi's death - his widow, Mary H. Lambi, presented Katsikis, now 18 and a freshman at Rutgers-New Brunswick, with a $1,000 scholarship.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Sporting togas and grapevine wreaths, 37 fifth graders at the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, celebrated Greek Day in ceremonies recently. The activities were the culmination of a three-month study of a history unit on ancient Greece. In keeping with ancient traditions, the students participated in Olympic games such as the shot put, discus throw and long distance run. The day also included poetry readings, songs and a student performance of the Odyssey. The day-long celebration ended with a feast for students and parents complete with grape leaves, Greek salad, and for dessert, baklava.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1990 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rome may not have been built in a day, but that doesn't mean we can't celebrate its founding. April 21 marks the city's 2,743d anniversary. To mark the occasion, everyone is invited to the University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology for a day of festivities highlighting the arts and culture of the Romans and Greeks - ancient and modern - in what is billed as Greco-Roman Day. There'll be food, folk music, dance, drama and demonstrations, talks...
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The F. W. Holbein School in Mount Holly is becoming a culture club. Students will be sampling a smorgasbord from countries all over the world, one each month, thanks to a new $2,000 grant for the school. Betty Anne Davison, Holbein's fine-arts teacher, and Rose Lewis, a basic skills reading teacher, received a federal grant in December for the project. "Black History Month is kind of like Christmas Day," Davison said. "You open up the presents, and then everything's gone. I decided we should study a culture a month, starting with Black History Month, then the Greek culture, because there are some children with a Greek background in school.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
WITH CLOTH AND CONCENTRATION, Cosmas Trifonidis, 11, turns his partner, Maria Malitas, 11, during a performance of a Greek folk dance at Penn's Landing. The dancers, from the Annunciation Greek Church in Elkins Park, celebrated Greek culture yesterday during the fifth annual Hellenic Festival, a gathering with traditional food, music and crafts.
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