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NEWS
March 14, 2014
IT SHOULD not pass without acclaim that Monday marks the 100th anniversary of one of the great achievements in the history of beer. On St. Patrick's Day 1914, a New York City coroner named Dr. Thomas Hayes Curtin stood before his associates and others at a Bronx social club and unveiled his wondrous invention: Green beer. Never before had anyone laid eyes on such a spectacle. Beer, the color of shamrocks, filling the mugs of hundreds. "Everything possible was green or decorated with that color," an eyewitness reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008 | By APRIL LISANTE, For the Daily News
AH, ST. PATRICK'S Day. Pub crawls, yards of green beer and bowls of mushy corned beef and cabbage If that's not your idea of fun, you're in luck. At many local bars and restaurants, the holiday traditionally celebrated as a raucous rite of spring has gone upscale. This means that if you love to paint shamrocks on your cheeks, pile obnoxious plastic green beads around your neck and get in line outside your favorite taproom at 6 a.m. for your chance to chug dyed Miller Lite, you may find yourself in the minority this year.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | BY JACK McKINNEY
With another St. Patrick's Day upon us, this is a public service advisory for all those presumed millions who at this time annually precede their identities as Americans with the word Irish and a hyphen. Judging by some recent happenings in our nation's capital, we appear to be entering an enlightened new era vis-a-vis Ireland. Sinn Fein, the legally recognized party of Irish Republicanism, just this week opened an office in Washington, headed by a fine example of Ireland's emancipated womanhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | By Marybeth C. Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
This weekend, perhaps, you plan to crawl the pubs, watch the parade and make the rounds of parties where shamrocks festoon the walls and green beer flows. But it's not enough. Your interest in things Irish may be piqued by some music you hear or lively dancing you see. Must you wait a full year to celebrate St. Patrick's magical isle again? Not at all. This area is rich in Irish tradition, and you don't have to be Irish to find inspiration in Irish literature, Irish heroes or Irish spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1995 | By Tom Walsh, FOR THE INQUIRER
OK, I want to talk about Ireland. . . . - Sinead O'Connor The Irish don't mince words. "Let me ask you something - why is it that whenever anything is written about the Irish, it's always about drinking and so forth?" These are the first words, after a brief introduction, from the lips of Geraldine Trainor, 36, of East Norriton, a member of the Irish Center at the Commodore Barry Club in Mount Airy. A native of Northern Ireland's County Tyrone, Trainor pauses while waxing the floor of the center's enormous ballroom - it is not a rhetorical question.
NEWS
March 16, 2006
RE IRISH stereotypes: Will Irish-Americans have a beer on St. Patrick's Day? Perhaps. I know that I often do. Will millions of Americans and others drink green beer on St. Patrick's Day - despite no claim to Irish ancestry? Absolutely. Those aren't the important questions. I don't question Don Russell's judgment as much as I question the judgment of the editors. (I know there have been some cuts - the Daily News does still have editors, right?) Mr. Russell, "Joe SixPack," writes a decent column about beer, a pretty specialized area of expertise.
LIVING
March 26, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
St. Paddy's Day is to bar owners what Christmas is to retailers: ka-ching! Suddenly everyone is a little bit Irish, and after a few green beers, a lot Irish. While in America St. Patrick's Day has come to resemble a Shamrock Mardi Gras, it really has very little to do with the way the holiday is celebrated in the Emerald Isle. "It's a totally American thing," says Fergus Carey, 36, owner of Fergie's at 12th and Sansom and a Dublin native 12 years off the boat. "In Ireland, you go to Mass and then have dinner with your family.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There's more to St. Patrick's Day than shamrocks and green beer, and the Gloucester County Historical Society wants people to know that. Through April 29, the museum is displaying Irish artifacts - most on loan from Gloucester County residents. "Most people don't know about Irish culture," said museum curator Leslie Watson, and are content "as long as they can have green beer and wear a plastic green derby hat on their head once a year. " With March serving as Irish History Month and tomorrow being St. Patrick's Day - a day typically known for parades and reveling - Watson, who is half-Irish and studied the culture at Boston College, thought it would be a good time to showcase Hibernian culture.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Dennis Clark, author of The Irish in Philadelphia, told a story about two men in a bar arguing about which brand of whiskey is the best: "Paddy's Whiskey is the best," says one of the men. "My wife and I each drank a quart of it Saturday night, and we got up the next morning at 7 a.m. and went to Mass. " The second man replied that that didn't prove anything. "The hell, it doesn't!" retorted the first. "I'm a Jew!" Members of the audience at Jenkintown's Immaculate Conception Church, who had come to hear Clark speak of the area's Irish roots, laughed with the storyteller.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1989 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some people maintain that St. Patrick's Day is too grand an excuse for uninhibited celebration to limit it to just one day - or one weekend, for that matter. So, even though the actual day is a week away, the zesty singing, drinking and eating will begin tomorrow in some quarters. It isn't likely that anyone takes this task more seriously than those who partake of the "Erin Express" free bus service along the "Green Route," with stops at nine of the area's better known Irish saloons.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2014
IT SHOULD not pass without acclaim that Monday marks the 100th anniversary of one of the great achievements in the history of beer. On St. Patrick's Day 1914, a New York City coroner named Dr. Thomas Hayes Curtin stood before his associates and others at a Bronx social club and unveiled his wondrous invention: Green beer. Never before had anyone laid eyes on such a spectacle. Beer, the color of shamrocks, filling the mugs of hundreds. "Everything possible was green or decorated with that color," an eyewitness reported.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The region's breweries have hit upon a new ingredient for their beers: environmental messaging. Their labels sing the praises of Delaware Bay oysters, pay homage to the headwaters of the Brandywine Creek, and highlight an aquatic insect that survives only in clean water. Many brewers also are donating a portion of the proceeds for stream restoration, land preservation, and other environmental projects. After Hurricane Sandy, it wasn't long before Flying Fish Brewing Co. in Camden County released its Forever Unloved Sandy brew (commonly referred to by its initials - F.U. Sandy)
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | John J. Rooney, For the Inquirer
John J. Rooney is emeritus professor of psychology at La Salle University and the author of "Bleachers in the Bedroom: the Swampoodle Irish and Connie Mack" Growing up in one of Philadelphia's many Irish American neighborhoods, I remember St. Patrick's Day with special fondness. It was a day we looked forward to well in advance. Often, when someone complained about the harshness of winter, they would be cheered with an "Ah well, it won't be too long 'til St. Patrick's Day. " It also offered a break from the rigors of Lent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008 | By APRIL LISANTE, For the Daily News
AH, ST. PATRICK'S Day. Pub crawls, yards of green beer and bowls of mushy corned beef and cabbage If that's not your idea of fun, you're in luck. At many local bars and restaurants, the holiday traditionally celebrated as a raucous rite of spring has gone upscale. This means that if you love to paint shamrocks on your cheeks, pile obnoxious plastic green beads around your neck and get in line outside your favorite taproom at 6 a.m. for your chance to chug dyed Miller Lite, you may find yourself in the minority this year.
NEWS
March 16, 2006
RE IRISH stereotypes: Will Irish-Americans have a beer on St. Patrick's Day? Perhaps. I know that I often do. Will millions of Americans and others drink green beer on St. Patrick's Day - despite no claim to Irish ancestry? Absolutely. Those aren't the important questions. I don't question Don Russell's judgment as much as I question the judgment of the editors. (I know there have been some cuts - the Daily News does still have editors, right?) Mr. Russell, "Joe SixPack," writes a decent column about beer, a pretty specialized area of expertise.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There's more to St. Patrick's Day than shamrocks and green beer, and the Gloucester County Historical Society wants people to know that. Through April 29, the museum is displaying Irish artifacts - most on loan from Gloucester County residents. "Most people don't know about Irish culture," said museum curator Leslie Watson, and are content "as long as they can have green beer and wear a plastic green derby hat on their head once a year. " With March serving as Irish History Month and tomorrow being St. Patrick's Day - a day typically known for parades and reveling - Watson, who is half-Irish and studied the culture at Boston College, thought it would be a good time to showcase Hibernian culture.
LIVING
March 26, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
St. Paddy's Day is to bar owners what Christmas is to retailers: ka-ching! Suddenly everyone is a little bit Irish, and after a few green beers, a lot Irish. While in America St. Patrick's Day has come to resemble a Shamrock Mardi Gras, it really has very little to do with the way the holiday is celebrated in the Emerald Isle. "It's a totally American thing," says Fergus Carey, 36, owner of Fergie's at 12th and Sansom and a Dublin native 12 years off the boat. "In Ireland, you go to Mass and then have dinner with your family.
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | By Hariette Behringer, FOR THE INQUIRER
My husband and I went to Savannah, Georgia, for the second largest St. Patrick's Day parade and celebration in America. Only New York's is bigger. Why on earth, we wondered, does this sleepy southern town of 150,000 people host such a spectacle? Are there any Irish there? Jenny Stacy, of the Savannah Convention and Visitors Bureau answers both questions. "Irish immigrants came here in the mid-19th century, mostly from Wexford, Cork and Mayo, escaping the potato famine to work as dock laborers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1995 | By Tom Walsh, FOR THE INQUIRER
OK, I want to talk about Ireland. . . . - Sinead O'Connor The Irish don't mince words. "Let me ask you something - why is it that whenever anything is written about the Irish, it's always about drinking and so forth?" These are the first words, after a brief introduction, from the lips of Geraldine Trainor, 36, of East Norriton, a member of the Irish Center at the Commodore Barry Club in Mount Airy. A native of Northern Ireland's County Tyrone, Trainor pauses while waxing the floor of the center's enormous ballroom - it is not a rhetorical question.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | BY JACK McKINNEY
With another St. Patrick's Day upon us, this is a public service advisory for all those presumed millions who at this time annually precede their identities as Americans with the word Irish and a hyphen. Judging by some recent happenings in our nation's capital, we appear to be entering an enlightened new era vis-a-vis Ireland. Sinn Fein, the legally recognized party of Irish Republicanism, just this week opened an office in Washington, headed by a fine example of Ireland's emancipated womanhood.
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