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BUSINESS
February 22, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, the proposed use of waterless urinals in the Comcast Center let loose a stream of labor indignation that threatened the tower's status as America's tallest green building. Get ready for some real commotion. Gov. Rendell is pushing for Pennsylvania's legislature to enact a state building code that would require environmentally friendly, energy-efficient construction. Whether he wants both residential and commercial development included is not yet known. Rendell was short on specifics in his call for a green building code, which he made ever so briefly in his Feb. 4 budget speech.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, the proposed use of waterless urinals in the Comcast Center let loose a stream of labor indignation that threatened the tower's status as America's tallest green building. Get ready for some real commotion. Gov. Rendell is pushing for Pennsylvania's legislature to enact a state building code that would require environmentally friendly, energy-efficient construction. Whether he wants both residential and commercial development included is not yet known. Rendell was short on specifics in his call for a green building code, which he made ever so briefly in his Feb. 4 budget speech.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
As achievements go, it's nowhere close to landing the Olympics. For enhancing the reputation Philadelphia seeks as a leader in the green-building movement, though, the city's selection as 2013 host for the U.S. Green Building Council's 12th annual conference could be a significant event. Quite possibly a game-changer for the region's economy. But that hinges, its advocates acknowledge, on much work that needs to be done between now and then - in City Hall and the state Capitol, in hospitality and tourism circles, even at the zoo and museums.
NEWS
August 10, 2003 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jeanne Klinge's son Donald was worried about her living alone. With much cajoling, he convinced his 75-year-old mother that it was time to move out of her three-bedroom home on Maple Avenue in Woodbury. "He was worried that I would fall and nobody would find me," said Klinge, a 47-year resident of Woodbury. At the same time, the old Green Building on Green Avenue was being renovated for senior housing. Klinge would watch from the back window of her home as it was transformed into a spacious housing complex.
NEWS
April 5, 2006 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
A waterless-urinals agreement is in the can, and that means that the Comcast Center will be able to install the environmentally friendly basins in its new headquarters, a spokesman for Mayor Street announced last night. Street brokered the complex deal between the developer, Liberty Property Trust, and Plumbers Union Local 690, with support from State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo after the potty standoff was made public in The Inquirer and became a cause celebre for the city's environmental groups.
NEWS
March 28, 2006
THANK YOU for raising the issue of Green Building in your March 22 editorial. We help nonprofit organizations in the region understand the advantages and savings of using green technology, whose impact leads directly to long-term sustainability. We hold workshops to educate nonprofit leaders on how to develop facilities that are both environmentally efficient and will help to support their missions. There is a strong connection between Green Building and economic viability, whether in the for-profit or nonprofit sector, and any attempt to block these efforts is counterproductive.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
The devastating 2008 fire at the Riverwalk at Millennium apartments in Conshohocken required a massive rebuild that has led to a green-building distinction for the complex: LEED certification. About 50 percent of the 375-unit development, built by Maryland-based Bozzuto Group, has qualified for the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design designation. Among the features that made that possible were the use of low-volatile organic compound paints and carpets, water-efficient landscaping, recycled construction materials, energy-saving air sealing, and heat-reflecting roofing technology.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Late-morning sun fills the two huge windows behind Liz Solms, who is seated on a sofa in a one-bedroom unit she recently refurbished at Touraine, an apartment building she co-owns at 15th and Spruce Streets. In one hand, Solms holds a three-page printout, a list of the materials she used in the renovation of the 986-square-foot unit and what makes each of them "green. " She doesn't really need the cheat sheet. She is Stephen E. Solms' daughter, and - like the legendary developer of Historic Landmarks for Living, which repurposed and revived such Philadelphia properties as the Chocolate Works in the early 1980s - she possesses not only his attention to detail but also his passion.
NEWS
January 21, 2010 | By Patrick Starr
This week, Mayor Nutter signed Philadelphia's first green building law, requiring that new city-owned buildings of a certain size must meet heightened environmental standards. The mayor and City Council deserve credit for a measure that will improve the city's finances and sustainability. Heating and cooling city-owned buildings costs taxpayers more than $30 million a year. With the cost of energy going up, this law meets an immediate need to reduce energy costs while meeting long-term goals to minimize waste, storm-water runoff, and water use. Several years ago, a Pennsylvania Environmental Council report, "Building Green: Overcoming Barriers in Philadelphia," looked at how the city could become more competitive in the area of green development.
REAL_ESTATE
November 16, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Twelve stories above City Avenue, Michael Pestronk is standing in a penthouse apartment, looking out over the Schuylkill toward Manayunk. The building, one of four in the 1,000-unit Presidential City apartment complex, is the Washington, which has undergone a top-to-bottom renovation by Pestronk and his brother, Matthew, known corporately as Post Bros. The second building, the Madison, is getting closer to completion, Michael Pestronk said, and the Adams and the Jefferson will follow.
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REAL_ESTATE
November 16, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Twelve stories above City Avenue, Michael Pestronk is standing in a penthouse apartment, looking out over the Schuylkill toward Manayunk. The building, one of four in the 1,000-unit Presidential City apartment complex, is the Washington, which has undergone a top-to-bottom renovation by Pestronk and his brother, Matthew, known corporately as Post Bros. The second building, the Madison, is getting closer to completion, Michael Pestronk said, and the Adams and the Jefferson will follow.
REAL_ESTATE
March 8, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I wrote about green building a few weeks back, and about how some studies show that houses with sustainable features sell for 10 percent to 14 percent more than comparable houses without them. I had interviewed Jim Maransky, president of E-Built L.L.C. and builder of the Icehouse in Fishtown, who, while confirming those results, added that the appraisal process is the place "where the green premium many times falls apart. " Others had made the same complaint, and I also was aware that the Appraisal Institute has been trying to address it for several years.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Janet Milkman took over as executive director at the Delaware Valley Green Building Council in 2009, LEED was a largely unfamiliar acronym, and the environmentally and energy-sensitive construction that the accreditation recognizes was not common in the region. Milkman acknowledges that there were days when she wondered whether she had made the right decision in taking the building council job, intended to promote green construction. "It was probably the depth of the recession.
NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the exhibit floor, the "Doctor of Cork" - actually, Bronx businessman Ken Bollella - touted the eco-attributes of cork flooring. It's lightweight. It insulates. While it will char, it won't ignite, he said. And termites won't eat it. Since it's mostly air, he said, "my joke is, if termites ate it, they'd die from gas. " Bollella's firm, Globus Cork, was one of 900 that set up shop in the Convention Center for the nation's annual paean to all things sustainable in the world of buildings.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Lewis Green built a handsome little hotel at Cooper Street and Railroad Avenue in 1881, Woodbury was a destination. "There were 139 trains coming through the city," says professional librarian and amateur preservationist Brian Bonfiglio. He believes the vacant Green Hotel - a landmark on a gateway to downtown - could help Woodbury become a destination again. "Right now, there's an enormous push to get the train [service] back," says Jacqualynn Knight, who with Bonfiglio is a member and prime mover of the Village Green Preservation Society.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has thousands of houses that resemble the three-story twin at Greene and West Apsley Streets in Germantown. The house, abandoned for 28 years, was in horrible shape, with holes in the third floor so large "that we had to lay doors over them so we could walk," said Porche Faulkner, 19, one of about 20 students from the YouthBuild Philadelphia Charter School on North Broad Street who are rehabbing it. Still, said Faulkner, who...
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 4.4-acre meadow wedged among elegant stone homes in tony Wynnewood is all that is left of the Toland family farm, which once sprawled across 300 acres from the Main Line railroad tracks almost to Montgomery Avenue. Over the last century, the farm was whittled away piece by piece to create a new residential development, though as recently as the 1970s, cows grazed in an open pasture, and chickens scurried around a barnyard just blocks from Wynnewood Shopping Center. Then last year, the matriarch of the family, Polly Toland, decided to sell her own home, adjacent to the meadow, and move to a retirement home.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
As achievements go, it's nowhere close to landing the Olympics. For enhancing the reputation Philadelphia seeks as a leader in the green-building movement, though, the city's selection as 2013 host for the U.S. Green Building Council's 12th annual conference could be a significant event. Quite possibly a game-changer for the region's economy. But that hinges, its advocates acknowledge, on much work that needs to be done between now and then - in City Hall and the state Capitol, in hospitality and tourism circles, even at the zoo and museums.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the mid-1990s, the World Wide Web was relatively new and just beginning to be appreciated by businesses for its e-commerce potential. To many, the Internet was still a great unknown and a source of anxiety. Thus, the name that Mia and Tracy Levesque chose at the time for their Web-design company: Yikes. It's a five-letter word the couple are uttering with regularity these days over their own anxiety. "This is the riskiest thing we've ever done," Tracy Levesque said, sitting cross-legged on the floor in the middle of a $1.1 million construction project in full sawdust-laden progress.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
The devastating 2008 fire at the Riverwalk at Millennium apartments in Conshohocken required a massive rebuild that has led to a green-building distinction for the complex: LEED certification. About 50 percent of the 375-unit development, built by Maryland-based Bozzuto Group, has qualified for the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design designation. Among the features that made that possible were the use of low-volatile organic compound paints and carpets, water-efficient landscaping, recycled construction materials, energy-saving air sealing, and heat-reflecting roofing technology.
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