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Green Day

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1997 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Green Day, three guys from Berkeley, Calif., who have sold more albums than any punk band in history, aren't making millions off their originality. It's their energy, attitude and hooks, plus rock-solid musicianship, that have propelled them to the top of the heap. And in Friday's show at the Electric Factory, they had enough of all four to burn. The trio ignored most songs on its new album, Nimrod (Reprise), that vary from the punk genre. Except for the Stray Cat strut of "Hitchin' a Ride" and the show's closer, a solo acoustic "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)
NEWS
November 1, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Can a punk-rock band maintain its credibility after delivering an aim-to-please arena show featuring mini-rock operas, special effects, a roof-raising version of Otis Day & the Knights' "Shout," a Queen cover, and a hulking professional football player (Eagles fullback Jon Ritchie) playing bass on an Operation Ivy song? Affirmative, as Green Day proved with a powderkeg performance at the nearly full Liacouras Center Friday that balanced the politically charged ire of their new concept album, American Idiot, with the image of loony-bin exiles they've cultivated over the last decade.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER CULTURAL CRITIC
The first thing you learn about American Idiot , the touring Green Day rock musical that opened Tuesday at the Merriam Theater, is that the show has more middle fingers and impolite words in five minutes than you'd get in five hours on South Street. For the next 90 minutes, the it-sucks-to-be-young perspective roars out of about 40 video monitors, 20 thoroughly capable singing actors, and 21 articulate, mostly high-decibel songs authored by the band and performed in a plain, industrial basement full of junky couches.
NEWS
June 16, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Green Day single-handedly resurrected '70s punk, single-handedly saving Punkness for the world. Now, the Berkeley, Calif.-born troupe has saved an actual life. Fact it's their art that saved the life of one Ruby Wilson. The 12-year-old Brit fan was cleaning up the garden at her family home in Halifax, Yorkshire, when she found "what looked like a round metal object," she told Halifax Today. She coulda played with it. But she quickly realized her find "looked like a hand grenade.
NEWS
May 30, 2002 | By Bethany Klein FOR THE INQUIRER
Green Day and Blink-182 shared top billing Tuesday night as the "Pop Disaster" tour set up at the Tweeter Center. But only one took home the crown. Like most bands to reach Behind the Music status, Green Day has a mythology, a survival story. It broke into the mainstream in 1994, when jumping the independent-label ship and signing with a major was practically a sin, and the band suffered for it. Heckled for treason by alienated punk fans and seemingly uneasy with its new, broader audience, Green Day displayed that tension in its live shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That's Green Day, up ahead, in the passing lane. The snot-nosed trio of cartoony California pop-punks play their music at 100 m.p.h. Like Little Richard or the Sex Pistols, they're never boring because they're so afraid of being bored. Faster, faster: Alienation is approaching from behind! At the Civic Center on Tuesday, the Bay Area band played for barely more than an hour. Did any of the preschool to high school kids, bounding about like overdosed chocoholics, feel gypped?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Sara Sherr and Fred Beckley also contributed
So what do the members of Green Day say when the purists imply that it's not possible to play sports arenas and be a punk-rock band? "I agree with them," says Mike Dirnt, bass player for the trio from Berkeley, Calif., who will bring the full-speed-ahead, obnoxious brat pop of the eight-times platinum Dookie and the new Insomniac (Reprise) to the Civic Center Tuesday. "We have certain ideals that have a lot to do with where we come from," Dirnt says, referring to the East Bay punk community from which Green Day sprang with the early Lookout releases 1,039 Smoothed Out Slappy Hours (1990)
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the hallway outside the respective locker rooms, Archbishop Carroll star Derrick Jones graciously congratulated Neumann-Goretti's Quade Green for his play in a back-and-forth contest before an overflow and raucous crowd. Green, an up-and-coming sophomore guard with multiple Division I scholarship offers, calmly buried a right-wing three-pointer with only 1.2 seconds to play to lift the Saints to a 71-69 triumph in a beyond thrilling Catholic League contest in Radnor. "I just followed my mechanics," Green said of connecting on a feed from Lamarr Kimble.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Never underestimate the power of three chords and a bad attitude. The no- frills formula has continued to reinvigorate pop since the dawn of rock and roll. It worked for Chuck Berry, the Rolling Stones, the Sex Pistols and Nirvana. And Green Day knows it well. Green Day, the trio of Bay-area suburban punks whose major-label debut album Dookie (Reprise) has taken the music industry by surprise, played to a packed house at the Trocadero yesterday. The band makes no secret of its admiration for its punk predecessors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
GREEN DAY'S "21st Century Breakdown" is the top-selling CD in America. Wal-Mart is the top CD retailer in America. But you can't buy "Breakdown" at Wal-Mart. What gives? The band says Wal-Mart refused to stock "21st Century Breakdown" because Green Day refused to edit the album for language and content. But, you say, Wal-Mart carries lots of objectionable musical content among its aisles of objectionable merchandise. True, but Green Day's album isn't mass-produced in Chinese sweatshops.
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NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the hallway outside the respective locker rooms, Archbishop Carroll star Derrick Jones graciously congratulated Neumann-Goretti's Quade Green for his play in a back-and-forth contest before an overflow and raucous crowd. Green, an up-and-coming sophomore guard with multiple Division I scholarship offers, calmly buried a right-wing three-pointer with only 1.2 seconds to play to lift the Saints to a 71-69 triumph in a beyond thrilling Catholic League contest in Radnor. "I just followed my mechanics," Green said of connecting on a feed from Lamarr Kimble.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S FALL when the leaves start to turn and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announces its new class of nominees. And Tattle goes, Huh? There's a little bit less of that this year as nominees include Velvet Underground founding member Lou Reed , Green Day and Nine Inch Nails (both in their first year of eligibility), the Smiths and Sting , all of whom have some legit rock cred. They're joined by repeat nominees the Paul Butterfield Blues Band , Chic , Joan Jett & the Blackhearts , Kraftwerk and N.W.A.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
Many Philadelphia schools are taking the progressive step of partnering with the Humane League, a farm animal advocacy group, on a program designed to promote plant-based diets starting this fall. The goal of the "Lean and Green Days" campaign is to curb excessive meat consumption in the public schools by not serving meat for one day each week, echoing the broader "Meatless Mondays" movement. Meat consumption isn't harmful in moderation, but many students are eating unhealthy amounts of processed animal products.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
This might not be a popular sentiment, but I'll take Best Coast over Green Day any day, even though, at the Liacouras Center on Wednesday, it's Billie Joe Armstrong's Berkeley-based punks who will headline and Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno's sun-soaked garage pop that will open the bill. "I can't compare myself to Billie Joe," says Best Coast's singer-songwriter Cosentino via e-mail. "I'm not even on that level. One of the first songs I learned on guitar was 'Time of Your Life.' Green Day was influential to me as a teenager, and later on, as a writer.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER CULTURAL CRITIC
The first thing you learn about American Idiot , the touring Green Day rock musical that opened Tuesday at the Merriam Theater, is that the show has more middle fingers and impolite words in five minutes than you'd get in five hours on South Street. For the next 90 minutes, the it-sucks-to-be-young perspective roars out of about 40 video monitors, 20 thoroughly capable singing actors, and 21 articulate, mostly high-decibel songs authored by the band and performed in a plain, industrial basement full of junky couches.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013
"AMERICAN IDIOT," the Broadway smash conjured from Green Day's 2004 punk-pop concept album of the same name, is definitely not for those uncomfortable with deviations from the traditional musical-theater blueprint. There's the amped-up score rendered faithfully by a five-piece onstage rock band. And "Idiot" boasts only a few spoken lines, while the songs are more about attitude than exposition. There is a story to be gleaned here, but it fights for the spotlight with an overriding nihilistic viewpoint.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Sunday Eye on the prize The offstage drama of a stagehands strike was actually kind of fitting for the Philadelphia Theatre Company's production of Katori Hall's The Mountaintop , about the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. reflecting on his life during his last night on earth. With the labor struggle peacefully resolved through negotiation, the show goes on at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre , Broad and Lombard Streets, with performances at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, 1 and 7 p.m. Wednesday, 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, and 3 p.m. next Sunday.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
THE CONCEPT of a Broadway musical scored with rock music is hardly a radical one. After all, "Hair" debuted when Lyndon Johnson was in the White House. But a punk-rock musical? Now that's a horse of a different decibel level. On the surface, punk seems like the genre least-suited to musical theater, having been forged in the mid-to-late-1970s as a response to safe, mass-market mainstream pop, whose own roots can be traced, in large part, to the Great White Way. Sonically, the two genres are worlds apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
GREEN DAY'S Billie Joe Armstrong is having a typical 21st Century Breakdown - he's off to rehab. Sunday's announcement by the band's rep comes after the spiky-haired frontman had a meltdown onstage at the iHeartRadio Music Festival in Las Vegas on Friday. As Green Day was wrapping up its performance, Armstrong profanely complained that the band's time was being cut short. "One minute left, one minute [expletive] left. You're gonna give me (expletive) one minute? . . . I'm not [expletive]
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lead guy Billy Joe Armstrong of art-punkers Green Day went into an onstage rampage at the iHeartRadio Music Festival in Las Vegas on Friday. He smashed his axe, ran around, and uttered unnice utterances. Rumor: The band was pressed to curtail its set to leave more time for following acts Rihanna and Usher . Festival host Clear Channel denies it. Now BJA's rep says he's checked into rehab for "substance abuse. " He landed in hospital earlier this month after returning from Italy. Local Emmy winners Give it up, yo, for local heroes who scored Emmys Sunday night at the 30th Annual Mid-Atlantic Emmy Awards at the Society Hill Sheraton on Saturday!
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