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Green Economy

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NEWS
July 7, 2009 | By ALLYSON SCHWARTZ & MICHAEL NUTTER
WHILE "going green" has long been associated with protecting the environment, we believe it should also be associated with saving and earning money. Clean, sustainable and livable communities go hand-in-hand with economic growth. In these tough economic times, many American cities and towns are searching for innovative ways to go green, seeking to make investments that will ultimately save taxpayer dollars and increase local property values. These efforts come in many forms - revitalizing municipal parks and public spaces, landscaping neighborhood gateways and key corridors, planting trees, constructing green roofs, cleaning and maintaining vacant lots.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Short and skinny, David Dennis doesn't look like the kind of beefy guy you might find on a construction site, but he's got something else that makes him marketable - a Building Performance Institute (BPI) certification as a building analyst. With Dennis and others like him on a crew, his boss, Mike Virelli, now has the credentials to land government contracting jobs in energy audits and weatherization. "It opens up doors for me," said Virelli, of D.A. Virelli Roofing in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Philadelphia is to fully capitalize on the business-growth and employment potential of the nascent green economy, a deeper commitment is needed from government, nonprofits, and the private sector, a study released yesterday concludes. Help is especially needed to train a workforce for these new jobs. The Emerging Industries Project is a 93-page analysis of three areas of the green economy: sustainable manufacturing, construction and demolition waste recycling, and energy efficiency and building retrofits.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The talk was of job opportunities, worker training programs, and a flourishing state economy. One manager from a Kennett Square firm said her clean-energy company was hiring - and expanding - throughout the United States. What recession? Though another dose of dismal unemployment data came from the Labor Department yesterday, optimism was in great supply in a ballroom at West Chester University on Thursday night. Why? The potential of Pennsylvania's green economy - assuming a major infusion through the latest stimulus measure now before Congress.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Charles Szoradi could figure out how to power a car or even a light bulb with his caffeine-free personal pep reservoir, he just might achieve his goal of ending America's energy-hogging ways. But for now, the 43-year-old Main Line environmental entrepreneur is gaining widespread acclaim and recognition as he presses the case for going green in more conventional ways. In the process, he's trying to make some money. His delivery is breathless, his enthusiasm seductive. But don't mistake for an over-the-top idealist this man who is perpetually strategizing, teaching, selling, researching, and inventing.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
THE LIVE taping of "Hardball with Chris Matthews" on Independence Mall yesterday was billed as a roundtable discussion on education, but turned into yet another Weiner roast. Matthews, with a black Phillies cap on his head, hosted the show from his hometown as part of NBC's "Education Nation On the Road" tour. Toward the end, Mayor Nutter and his wife, Lisa, president of Philadelphia Academies, spoke briefly about the struggle to get the community to reinvest in public education and prepare students for a changing job market.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By David Kreutzer
Green jobs - or, as our president calls them, the "jobs of the future" - have been notoriously tough to define and count. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics recently did it, though, and now it's the result that's notorious. Facing an admittedly difficult project, the BLS created a definition that is so broad as to make it a meaningless measure of the green economy. Here's a sneak preview: There are 33 times as many green jobs in the septic tank and portable toilet servicing industry as there are in solar electricity utilities.
NEWS
March 25, 2008 | By Ken Lewis
The world's largest banks have been joining the movement to address climate change with great enthusiasm in recent years. That's great, but one thing we're learning is that keeping pace with the demands of the green economy will take more than just big piles of money doled out in traditional ways. Don't get me wrong - big piles of money are always a good start. But many emerging technologies are so new, and markets are growing and evolving so rapidly, that new financial approaches are needed to effectively meet the needs of the marketplace.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In its annual report on the state of Pennsylvania's economy, the Keystone Research Center credits the federal government with stopping the economic "free fall," but it adds that governments should pay more attention to the plight of most wage earners. All but the wealthiest of workers have been losing ground, the group said, and that bodes poorly for consumer spending. Stephen Herzenberg, an MIT-trained economist who is executive director of the independent center - which he described as "progressive" - said state and federal governments would need to keep stimulating the economy through 2010 "because it will take at least that long for private-sector demand to rebound.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While Vice President Biden launches an initiative in Philadelphia tomorrow focusing on using green jobs to raise living standards for middle-class Americans, Suechada Poynter, 39, will be crawling around the basement of a Philadelphia rowhouse. Checking for air leaks and improperly functioning furnaces in her job as a home energy auditor, Poynter will not be available to talk to Biden, but she has a message for him: "Green jobs have opened a lot of doors for a lot of lower-class people to get into this field," said Poynter, a Thai immigrant and mother of seven who lives in Philadelphia's Logan section and earns $11 an hour for her work.
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NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By David Kreutzer
Green jobs - or, as our president calls them, the "jobs of the future" - have been notoriously tough to define and count. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics recently did it, though, and now it's the result that's notorious. Facing an admittedly difficult project, the BLS created a definition that is so broad as to make it a meaningless measure of the green economy. Here's a sneak preview: There are 33 times as many green jobs in the septic tank and portable toilet servicing industry as there are in solar electricity utilities.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Jobs, jobs, jobs. A green economy can bring them on. That was one focus of a sustainability forum Friday led by Mayor Nutter, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson, and Brazilian Environment Minister Izabella Teixeira. Nutter cited the replacement of 85,000 incandescent traffic signals with LEDs in the last year. Besides saving the city $1 million a year on energy costs, "someone had to make them, and someone had to install them. . . . It is about putting people to work.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
THE LIVE taping of "Hardball with Chris Matthews" on Independence Mall yesterday was billed as a roundtable discussion on education, but turned into yet another Weiner roast. Matthews, with a black Phillies cap on his head, hosted the show from his hometown as part of NBC's "Education Nation On the Road" tour. Toward the end, Mayor Nutter and his wife, Lisa, president of Philadelphia Academies, spoke briefly about the struggle to get the community to reinvest in public education and prepare students for a changing job market.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Short and skinny, David Dennis doesn't look like the kind of beefy guy you might find on a construction site, but he's got something else that makes him marketable - a Building Performance Institute (BPI) certification as a building analyst. With Dennis and others like him on a crew, his boss, Mike Virelli, now has the credentials to land government contracting jobs in energy audits and weatherization. "It opens up doors for me," said Virelli, of D.A. Virelli Roofing in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Charles Szoradi could figure out how to power a car or even a light bulb with his caffeine-free personal pep reservoir, he just might achieve his goal of ending America's energy-hogging ways. But for now, the 43-year-old Main Line environmental entrepreneur is gaining widespread acclaim and recognition as he presses the case for going green in more conventional ways. In the process, he's trying to make some money. His delivery is breathless, his enthusiasm seductive. But don't mistake for an over-the-top idealist this man who is perpetually strategizing, teaching, selling, researching, and inventing.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Charles Szoradi could figure out how to power a car or even a light bulb with his caffeine-free personal pep reservoir, he just might achieve his goal of ending America's energy-hogging ways. But for now, the 43-year-old Main Line environmental entrepreneur is gaining widespread acclaim and recognition as he presses the case for going green in more conventional ways. In the process, he's trying to make some money. His delivery is breathless, his enthusiasm seductive. But don't mistake for an over-the-top idealist this man who is perpetually strategizing, teaching, selling, researching, and inventing.
NEWS
October 19, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the dawn of the 20th century, the nation's forests were in trouble. The country was headed for a timber famine. The great woodlands of the East had been cut, and those in the West were in the path of the loggers. Public land was being sold for pennies or given away outright. To Gifford Pinchot, a young forester from Pennsylvania, it was "a gigantic and lamentable massacre. " He thought the nation's resources should belong to - and benefit - all, not just a wealthy and powerful few. He decided to do something about it. In 1905, largely due to his efforts, the U.S. Forest Service was created, and he became its first chief.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As many as 30,000 green-building advocates from around the world will convene in Philadelphia for an industry conference three years from now. And already, the worrying has begun about the spotlight this high-profile, November 2012 event - sponsored by the U.S. Green Building Council, a driving force in the sustainable-construction movement - will focus on this region. "If you invite 30,000 sustainability/green-building advocates to your city, you better hope you have some good news for them," said Heather Shayne Blakeslee, programs and advocacy director at the Delaware Valley Green Building Council, the national group's only Pennsylvania chapter.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Philadelphia is to fully capitalize on the business-growth and employment potential of the nascent green economy, a deeper commitment is needed from government, nonprofits, and the private sector, a study released yesterday concludes. Help is especially needed to train a workforce for these new jobs. The Emerging Industries Project is a 93-page analysis of three areas of the green economy: sustainable manufacturing, construction and demolition waste recycling, and energy efficiency and building retrofits.
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