CollectionsGreen Goblin
IN THE NEWS

Green Goblin

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2002 | BY JEROME MAIDA, FOR THE DAILY NEWS
Marvel is looking to strike while the spider is hot. The leading comic book publisher is looking to capitalize on mainstream excitement for the "Spider-Man" movie. It has worked hard to ensure that there is plenty of stuff on the shelves in May, for those who may be picking up a Spider-Man book for the first time in years - or ever -this month. J. Michael Straczynski continues his incredibly popular run on "Amazing Spider-Man" with a new four-issue story arc that begins with issue No. 42. It provides readers with a nice jumping-on point.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Webmasterful. That's Tobey Maguire as angsty nerd Peter Parker and his arachnid alter ego Spider-Man. As for Sam Raimi's movie, it's diverting, but its superheroics are gung-hokum beside the saga of one teen's hunger for visibility, validation and love. As long as the film is about the metamorphosis of high-school senior into hybrid life-form (his power comes from being bitten by a mutant arachnid), Spider-Man is super. Once the focus shifts to Spidey's face-off against the genetically juiced archvillain the Green Goblin, it's just a perfunctory clash between good and vile.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Spider-Man has taken a quantum leap. Yeah, I know, Spider-Man is supposed to do that, that's his job. But we're talking about Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark , the most expensive show in Broadway history (about $70 million), the butt of jokes for its many mishaps, the record-breaker for its failure to come out of previews, the mess trashed by critics, the source of intrigue for its ouster of original director and cowriter Julie Taymor. The Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark that opened, finally, Tuesday night at Broadway's Foxwoods Theatre (I saw Thursday's critics' preview)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2002 | By DAVID GORGOS & DAVID BLEILER For the Daily News
AFTER REACHING a nadir with the unreleased live-action disaster "The Fantastic Four," Marvel Comics has been on quite a roll with its big-screen adaptations. From "Blade" to "X-Men," they've shown a knack for harnessing the delicate mix of exciting action, snappy dialogue and out-of-this-world heroics of the colorful comics. Still, that didn't prepare the world for the phenomenon that is "Spider-Man" (VHS: $24.99; DVD: $28.99). With Sam Raimi of "Evil Dead" fame directing, and brooding Tobey Maguire in the lead, you had the feeling that this wasn't going to be the campy 1970s Spider-Man that appeared on "The Electric Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2002 | This story wa compiled by Daily News staff writers Gary Thompson, Ellen Gray, Jonathan Takiff and Jenice M. Armstrong and correspondent Jerome Maida
"Spider-Man" sold $114 million worth of movie tickets last weekend, and he's generating sales in and out of theaters, everywhere you look. Here's a rundown of Spider-Man stuff you can get if the movie left you wanting more, more, more. IN HOLLYWOOD, they're acting as if they've just broken the sound barrier. Nobody thought a movie could make $100 million in just one weekend, not in early May. But last weekend, "Spider-Man" exploded every expert's notion of what a movie could do, making $114.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By MARK KENNEDY, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Look who's giving safety advice: None other than Broadway's one-time injury-happy Spider-Man. Reeve Carney, who plays the hero in the hit musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," and Robert Cuccioli, who plays the Green Goblin, put aside their substantial comic-book differences Thursday - and apparently any sense of irony - to team up and offer tips about keeping kids safe this Halloween. Flanked by four costumed villains from the show and representatives from the city's fire and police departments, the actors reminded parents to examine all Halloween candy and never eat any unwrapped treats, ensure children wear flame-retardant costumes and masks that never impeded their ability to see and hear, and avoid strangers or unfamiliar houses.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2004 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
What a difference two years - and $400 million - makes. When Kirsten Dunst and Tobey Maguire showed up for work for the first "Spider-Man" movie, Dunst was 19 and too naive to know she could have opted out of some of her stunt scenes, and Maguire was best known for low-key roles in dramas "The Cider House Rules" and "The Ice Storm. " For the sequel, Dunst had her own posse of wigmakers and wardrobe stylists and the confidence to summon her stunt double whenever she felt like it. Maguire's paycheck quadrupled - to a reported $17 million - and he got what every actor playing a superhero wishes for: "Better harnesses," he said.
NEWS
June 29, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Much as I enjoyed watching Peter Parker develop his arachnid alter ego in Spider-Man, Tobey Maguire was still something of the Spider-Boy. This time around the web he's lost the teen angst and, all spinnerets firing, he untangles the contradictions of being a student, a superhero and a man in love. So what if Peter hasn't learned to sort the laundry and his Spidey suit bleeds pinkish splotches on his tidy whities? Spider-Man 2 is a deeply satisfying and involving sequel, one that builds upon the complications of the first but stands on its own. With director Sam Raimi at the helm and Maguire in the hot seat, this franchise is about the challenges of simultaneously mustering moral and physical strength.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2002 | BY JEROME MAIDA, FOR THE DAILY NEWS
MOST TV FANS recognize J. Michael Straczynski as the writer behind the hit show "Babylon 5. " To comic book fans, he is the guy who saved "Spider-Man. " No, the web-slinger was never in any danger of cancellation, but after almost a decade of mostly mediocre stories, fans had dropped the character's titles in droves. By the spring of 2001, sales of "The Amazing Spider-Man" - the hero's flagship title, had slipped to 50,000 a month. That would be fine for most comics, but not "Spider-Man.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By MARK KENNEDY, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Look who's giving safety advice: None other than Broadway's one-time injury-happy Spider-Man. Reeve Carney, who plays the hero in the hit musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," and Robert Cuccioli, who plays the Green Goblin, put aside their substantial comic-book differences Thursday - and apparently any sense of irony - to team up and offer tips about keeping kids safe this Halloween. Flanked by four costumed villains from the show and representatives from the city's fire and police departments, the actors reminded parents to examine all Halloween candy and never eat any unwrapped treats, ensure children wear flame-retardant costumes and masks that never impeded their ability to see and hear, and avoid strangers or unfamiliar houses.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Spider-Man has taken a quantum leap. Yeah, I know, Spider-Man is supposed to do that, that's his job. But we're talking about Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark , the most expensive show in Broadway history (about $70 million), the butt of jokes for its many mishaps, the record-breaker for its failure to come out of previews, the mess trashed by critics, the source of intrigue for its ouster of original director and cowriter Julie Taymor. The Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark that opened, finally, Tuesday night at Broadway's Foxwoods Theatre (I saw Thursday's critics' preview)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
"DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES" star Eva Longoria is being sued for at least $4 million over her financially troubled Las Vegas nightclub, Beso. Mali Nachum , a former partner in the club, claims that Eva violated California usury laws. The suit was filed Monday in L.A. Nachum, as you will soon see, has cojones grande . Eva lent Nachum $1 million for the venture in 2009 and was promised repayment at 8 percent annual interest and a large stake in the club. The club tanked and recently filed for bankruptcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
For a variety of reasons - which will be revealed in the "Best of 2009" column - Comics Guy has not reviewed many Marvel comics in 2009. But he could not let the year come to a close without a look at "Dark Avengers," arguably the most entertaining title the publisher puts out. The biggest key to the book's success is writer Brian Michael Bendis' portrayal of the team's leader, Norman Osborn. As most fans know, Osborn is best-known as the Green Goblin, a Spider-Man foe who reached iconic status 35 years ago when he killed Spider-Man's girlfriend Gwen Stacy and shortly after that heinous act accidentally impaled himself with one of his own gliders.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2007 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
When Sam Raimi made it known he was going to use longtime Spider-Man foe The Sandman in the third installment of the webspinner's film franchise, producer Avi Arad insisted that Venom be included as well. Though Raimi had a fondness for the older characters and did classic baddies like the Green Goblin and Doctor Octopus justice in the first two films, Arad knew that fans were clamoring to see Venom, who to many is the Spidey bad guy and definitely the best one to appear in the last two decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2004 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
What a difference two years - and $400 million - makes. When Kirsten Dunst and Tobey Maguire showed up for work for the first "Spider-Man" movie, Dunst was 19 and too naive to know she could have opted out of some of her stunt scenes, and Maguire was best known for low-key roles in dramas "The Cider House Rules" and "The Ice Storm. " For the sequel, Dunst had her own posse of wigmakers and wardrobe stylists and the confidence to summon her stunt double whenever she felt like it. Maguire's paycheck quadrupled - to a reported $17 million - and he got what every actor playing a superhero wishes for: "Better harnesses," he said.
NEWS
June 29, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Much as I enjoyed watching Peter Parker develop his arachnid alter ego in Spider-Man, Tobey Maguire was still something of the Spider-Boy. This time around the web he's lost the teen angst and, all spinnerets firing, he untangles the contradictions of being a student, a superhero and a man in love. So what if Peter hasn't learned to sort the laundry and his Spidey suit bleeds pinkish splotches on his tidy whities? Spider-Man 2 is a deeply satisfying and involving sequel, one that builds upon the complications of the first but stands on its own. With director Sam Raimi at the helm and Maguire in the hot seat, this franchise is about the challenges of simultaneously mustering moral and physical strength.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If you catch an interview this summer with a big-ticket action hero - Will Smith, say, talking up I, Robot, or Brad Pitt, selling his $200 million sword-and-sandals saga, Troy - and they start talking about how they did their own stunt work, well . . . listen to Tobey Maguire. "You hear people saying that," gripes the star of Spider-Man 2, which opens June 30. "Then I watch these films and I can tell that they're lying. Sure, some people do some stunts, but there are certain things that, first of all, most people cannot do, where you need a professional stuntman/gymnast.
SPORTS
May 18, 2003 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
Stanton Barrett Jr. has already made a name for himself as an award-winning stuntman in Hollywood, where climbing unscathed from behind the wheel of a fiery wreck is considered a good day at the office. Along with his penchant for performing daring deeds for the television and movie industries, Barrett inherited a need for speed from his father. Stan Barrett was the first to exceed the speed of sound in a ground vehicle, reaching 739.666 m.p.h. in 1979. He also made sporadic appearances in NASCAR, competing in 19 Winston Cup races throughout the 1980s.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|