CollectionsGreen Hills Farm
IN THE NEWS

Green Hills Farm

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Janice Comfort Walsh, 90, of Gardenville, Bucks County, an occupational therapist and the adopted daughter of author, activist, and humanitarian Pearl S. Buck, died in her sleep Friday, March 11, at Pine Run Health Center, Doylestown. Born in Troy, N.Y., Miss Walsh was adopted at the age of 3 months in 1925 by Pearl Buck and her first husband, John Lossing Buck, an American agricultural economist specializing in the rural economy of China. Miss Walsh spent her early years in China, but as political tensions escalated, the family fled to Japan.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / JON ADAMS
It was truly a day for extended families as the Pearl S. Buck Foundation celebrated Sponsor Day on Sunday at its namesake's estate, Green Hills Farm in Hilltown Township. Individuals and families who have sponsored half-American children in Asia were honored, and Amerasian children whom the foundation has reunited with American fathers or placed in American foster homes were special guests. A highlight of the celebration was the attendance of Chatchawan "Danny" Dineche, 19. Shortly after he was born in Thailand, his soldier father returned to the United States and his Thai mother abandoned him. He became a sponsored child in sixth grade and a year ago he was awarded an exchange-student scholarship.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Vacations, antiques and art were just some of the items auctioned last weekend at the "Children Mean the World to Us" fund-raising benefit at Green Hills Farm, the Pearl S. Buck estate in Perkasie. About 250 people came out last Sunday for the 10th annual auction, which raised an estimated $10,000. Proceeds will go to special-needs children in the Welcome House Adoption Program of the Pearl S. Buck Foundation Inc. On the benefit committee, led by Elizabeth Biester of Furlong, were Diana Nyland, New Hope; Georgie Coles, Holicong; Pat Edwards and Irma Webster, both of Chalfont; Jeanette Dilg and Judy Sapperstein, both of Doylestown Township; Janet and William Haines, Buckingham, and Guila Newbert, Kintnersville.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | By Sally Downey, Special to The Inquirer
Every spring they return. Some dress in silly costumes, others wave flags as they shepherd flocks of tourists down Elfreth's Alley and through the Betsy Ross house. They are the guides who lead visitors on tours of the area's most familiar attractions. What happens when the visitors go home and the tour guide becomes the tourist? We asked some professional guides where they like to tour. British-born Sheila Buckley's first choice, she quips, is "London!" A less costly alternative is Pearl Buck's home at Green Hills Farm near Doylestown.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From 1934 until her death in 1973, Pearl Buck lived in a field-stone farmhouse in Bucks County she called "Green Hills Farm" and where she wrote many of her books and articles. Open to the public for guided tours since 1974, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1980, the three-story, 157-year-old house is one of the county's most popular tourist stops. But after two decades without major repairs, the structure is starting to show its age. The Pearl Buck Foundation wants to fix that.
LIVING
March 2, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once, Pearl S. Buck was just about the hottest American writer around. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for The Good Earth and the Nobel Prize in 1938 for that and other works. And then, just when you might have expected Buck to settle into the ranks of genuinely classic authors, she fell off the radar screen. What happened? In his recent book, Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography, Peter Conn insightfully explores what befell Buck's literary reputation. "I would define her greatness as a combination of having written books that, if they weren't great, were very good . . . and of having a range of political and humanitarian activities," Conn said in a recent interview.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When writer Pearl S. Buck marched to the farm next door to her Bucks County home carrying a squirming baby in her arms, David Yoder became a first. Yoder, then 1 year old, was fresh from a Rochester orphanage. He was a biracial child, the son of an unmarried 17-year-old American girl who got pregnant while her family lived in India. In the 1940s, that meant ostracism and shame. No adoption agency could place him. Buck would have none of that. So, as she succinctly put it in an interview before her death, "I founded my own damned agency.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
"It was a scenario right out of Storage Wars . " Michael Carlisle of InkWell Management in New York represents the estate of Pearl S. Buck, the Nobel Prize-winning author of The Good Earth who lived much of her life in Bucks County. He is trying to describe the moment a previously unknown Buck novel was discovered in a storage unit in, of all places, Texas. As announced Wednesday, the novel, titled The Eternal Wonder , will be published, in digital and paperback editions, on Oct. 22 by Open Road Integrated Media of New York.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These days, we call it real estate. Or acreage. In another time and place - the pre-industrial China of the Manchu Dynasty - it was salvation. Pearl S. Buck called it, simply, The Good Earth. Buck won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for her novel. In 1938, Buck won the Nobel Prize for Literature. This prize was for the body of her work. Reportedly, the king of Sweden, who bestowed but did not select the Nobel award, confided to Buck that his favorite novel of hers was not The Good Earth but The Mother.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pearl S. Buck foundation plans to sell two valuable paintings that belonged to the author so it can pay for restorations to her historic home. The planned Dec. 4 auction takes the Bucks County nonprofit into contentious and ethically muddy terrain, as sales of institutional holdings rank among the art world's most controversial practices. "It may not be a popular decision in the eyes of some people," said Janet Mintzer, president and CEO of Pearl S. Buck International.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Janice Comfort Walsh, 90, of Gardenville, Bucks County, an occupational therapist and the adopted daughter of author, activist, and humanitarian Pearl S. Buck, died in her sleep Friday, March 11, at Pine Run Health Center, Doylestown. Born in Troy, N.Y., Miss Walsh was adopted at the age of 3 months in 1925 by Pearl Buck and her first husband, John Lossing Buck, an American agricultural economist specializing in the rural economy of China. Miss Walsh spent her early years in China, but as political tensions escalated, the family fled to Japan.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
"It was a scenario right out of Storage Wars . " Michael Carlisle of InkWell Management in New York represents the estate of Pearl S. Buck, the Nobel Prize-winning author of The Good Earth who lived much of her life in Bucks County. He is trying to describe the moment a previously unknown Buck novel was discovered in a storage unit in, of all places, Texas. As announced Wednesday, the novel, titled The Eternal Wonder , will be published, in digital and paperback editions, on Oct. 22 by Open Road Integrated Media of New York.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pearl S. Buck foundation plans to sell two valuable paintings that belonged to the author so it can pay for restorations to her historic home. The planned Dec. 4 auction takes the Bucks County nonprofit into contentious and ethically muddy terrain, as sales of institutional holdings rank among the art world's most controversial practices. "It may not be a popular decision in the eyes of some people," said Janet Mintzer, president and CEO of Pearl S. Buck International.
NEWS
July 20, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A priceless, stolen manuscript recovered by the FBI. A dispute over its ownership. The drama played out on television and the front pages of newspapers. If you're running Pearl S. Buck International, the Bucks County foundation devoted to promoting the life and work of the author, these circumstances add up to one thing: The chance of a lifetime. If that sounds strange, consider how Buck has been largely forgotten since her 1973 death, and how the foundation that runs her historic home in Perkasie struggles to attract visitors, donors and attention.
NEWS
June 27, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The FBI's Philadelphia office has recovered the "priceless" lost manuscript of Pearl S. Buck's The Good Earth, the novel that won the Bucks County resident the Pulitzer Prize and was instrumental in her winning the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938. The bureau scheduled a news conference for this morning to announce the recovery of the typewritten manuscript, which was consigned this month to the Samuel T. Freeman Co. auction house. "The manuscript has been missing since at least 1966 and is considered priceless," the FBI said in a news release yesterday.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a grove of evergreens, several yards off a windswept Bucks County road, seven dignitaries from China bowed in unison in front of Pearl S. Buck's tombstone yesterday at her former home, making up for the decades when she was non grata in their homeland. The delegation was visiting the restored Hilltown homestead that is the headquarters of Pearl S. Buck International, her humanitarian organization, to issue a formal invitation to a 110th birthday celebration for Buck in Zhenjiang in October.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When writer Pearl S. Buck marched to the farm next door to her Bucks County home carrying a squirming baby in her arms, David Yoder became a first. Yoder, then 1 year old, was fresh from a Rochester orphanage. He was a biracial child, the son of an unmarried 17-year-old American girl who got pregnant while her family lived in India. In the 1940s, that meant ostracism and shame. No adoption agency could place him. Buck would have none of that. So, as she succinctly put it in an interview before her death, "I founded my own damned agency.
LIVING
March 2, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once, Pearl S. Buck was just about the hottest American writer around. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for The Good Earth and the Nobel Prize in 1938 for that and other works. And then, just when you might have expected Buck to settle into the ranks of genuinely classic authors, she fell off the radar screen. What happened? In his recent book, Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography, Peter Conn insightfully explores what befell Buck's literary reputation. "I would define her greatness as a combination of having written books that, if they weren't great, were very good . . . and of having a range of political and humanitarian activities," Conn said in a recent interview.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Vacations, antiques and art were just some of the items auctioned last weekend at the "Children Mean the World to Us" fund-raising benefit at Green Hills Farm, the Pearl S. Buck estate in Perkasie. About 250 people came out last Sunday for the 10th annual auction, which raised an estimated $10,000. Proceeds will go to special-needs children in the Welcome House Adoption Program of the Pearl S. Buck Foundation Inc. On the benefit committee, led by Elizabeth Biester of Furlong, were Diana Nyland, New Hope; Georgie Coles, Holicong; Pat Edwards and Irma Webster, both of Chalfont; Jeanette Dilg and Judy Sapperstein, both of Doylestown Township; Janet and William Haines, Buckingham, and Guila Newbert, Kintnersville.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These days, we call it real estate. Or acreage. In another time and place - the pre-industrial China of the Manchu Dynasty - it was salvation. Pearl S. Buck called it, simply, The Good Earth. Buck won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for her novel. In 1938, Buck won the Nobel Prize for Literature. This prize was for the body of her work. Reportedly, the king of Sweden, who bestowed but did not select the Nobel award, confided to Buck that his favorite novel of hers was not The Good Earth but The Mother.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|