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Green Jobs

NEWS
September 4, 2012
By Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic Where have all the copy boys, blacksmiths, and elevator operators gone? We could ask the same of coopers, the artisans who crafted wooden barrels back in the days before plastic bottles - when households needed churns, casks, and hogsheads to hold liquids. The word milliner might ring a bell with some hat-wearing church ladies. But, really, when was the last time you bought a custom-made, hand-fitted hat? Jobs must change with the times.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The leading question of the day, President Obama said in a widely publicized jobs forum in Washington yesterday, is: "How do we get businesses to start hiring again?" In Philadelphia, ideas and answers to that question flowed yesterday in the Convention Center, where State Reps. Dwight Evans and John Myers, both city Democrats, held a local version attended by at least 130 politicians, labor leaders, nonprofit executives, and businesspeople. More than 20 of them spoke in a wide-ranging discussion on topics that included workforce training, green jobs, dredging the Delaware River, poor educational quality, global competitiveness, and a culture that emphasizes jobs over the kind of entrepreneurship that creates jobs.
NEWS
January 9, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Employers shed 85,000 jobs in December - worse than expected - as the economy continued to stumble on its way to recovery, the Labor Department reported yesterday. Even a significant increase of 46,500 jobs in temporary staffing, long considered a leading indicator of eventual permanent hiring, could not offset widespread declines in trade, manufacturing, and, particularly, construction, which lost 53,000 jobs - the most of any sector. There are nearly 15.3 million unemployed people in the United States, up from 7.7 million at the start of the recession in December 2007.
NEWS
July 7, 2009
Continue fight against warming The passing of the Waxman-Markey bill in the U.S. House is not the success it might appear. In fact, we have hardly made a dent in the fight against global warming ("House passes climate bill," June 27). While it is vital that the United States takes a strong stand to limit emissions, we have again proven that petty politics can eclipse the overwhelming scientific evidence that global warming is a reality and must be addressed. Those who don't accept the reality of global warming have again succeeded in holding us back from taking the necessary measures to clean up our environment.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Doyle Mcmanus
The State of the Union address is a political exercise in the best of times. But when a president is running for reelection and Congress is dominated by his most bitter opponents, there's even less pretense than usual. The State of the Union address that President Obama delivered this week was, in a sense, the first formal speech of his reelection campaign. It was his chance to wedge himself into the noise of the Republican primary campaign for 66 minutes of uninterrupted television time, and he took advantage of it. It was a blue-collar speech, aimed largely at the swing voters the president needs to woo most - the middle- and low-income workers still struggling in the recession's wake.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let the power games begin. On Wednesday, Philadelphia became the largest U.S. city to join an Environmental Protection Agency program aimed at getting more people, businesses, institutions - and more towns - to purchase electricity generated by solar panels, wind turbines, and other "green" sources. The program is voluntary, but once a city opts in, competition can heat up. Until Philadelphia's entry, Washington had bragging rights as the largest municipality in the program.
NEWS
October 20, 2012 | By Charles Lane
Al Gore is about 50 times richer than he was when he left the vice presidency in 2001. According to an Oct. 11 report by the Washington Post's Carol D. Leonnig, Gore accumulated a Romneyesque $100 million partly by investing in alternative-energy firms subsidized by the Obama administration. Two days after that story ran, Mitt Romney proclaimed at a rally in Ohio's Appalachian coal country: "We have a lot of coal; we are going to use it. We are going to keep those jobs. " Thousands cheered.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With no less urgent a message than this one - that the nation's economic future is at stake - labor and environmental leaders today will launch a 22-state "Made in America" jobs tour that will include a stop in Philadelphia, likely later this month. The main purpose of the tour, which will end in late September with a rally in Pittsburgh, is to emphasize that a clean-energy economy "is the next industrial foundation for America," said Leo Gerard, president of the United Steelworkers of America.
NEWS
June 15, 2010
Pennsylvania will receive $500,000 in federal grant money to provide military veterans with training for environmentally friendly jobs, the U.S. Department of Labor said Tuesday. The award is among 22 grants nationwide, totaling $9 million. For Pennsylvania, this is the second year it has received a Veterans' Employment and Training Service grant. New Jersey did not receive a grant. Assistant Labor Secretary Raymond Jefferson said the grants this year will help provide 4,000 veterans with training for renewable energy, or green, jobs.
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