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Green Thumb

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NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Patricia Quigley, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Clementon employees Ellen Kovalchuk and Margaret Davenport recently were honored by the Borough Council for their involvement with Green Thumb Inc., although neither works with plants. The two women hold part-time clerical jobs in the Police Department and borough clerk's office through the Green Thumb program, which trains and places women and men over age 55 in various jobs at nonprofit agencies or organizations. Kovalchuk, 71, has worked for the Police Department for nine years, handling filing, light typing and receptionist duties.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013
Inquirer staff writer Virginia Smith is writing this week from the Philadelphia Flower Show. These posts appeared on her blog, "Kiss the Earth," at philly.com/kisstheearth. Read her stories at philly.com/ginny, and other Flower Show coverage at philly.com/flowershow. Princess Beatrice would be so bored She'd be so bored in Room 201C at the show, the Make and Take room. I mean, this is the gal who showed up at William and Kate's 2011 wedding in a headpiece - known as a fascinator - described as "a beige toilet seat," "antlers," and, kindly, "a pretzel-shaped bow. " It was unbelievable.
NEWS
July 10, 1995 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Visions of Norristown rarely include scenes of flowers, vine-covered trellises and fruit trees, but the borough's garden club aims to change that. For the last 11 years, it has sponsored a garden contest that pits green thumb against green thumb in this decidedly concrete borough. This year's contest, scheduled for tomorrow, includes cash prizes for the winners in six categories: side-yard, front-yard and rear-yard flower gardens, vegetable gardens, window gardens and container gardens.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | By Cathleen Egan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Lower Camden County Regional School District has agreed to act as a host to Green Thumb Inc., a federally funded agency that provides employment for senior citizens. The district plans to place its first Green Thumb participant, who will be selected in the next few weeks, to work in the library at Overbrook Junior High School in Lindenwold, said Michael Schreiner, superintendent of the regional district. Schreiner said the school board requested that the person chosen reside in one of the region's seven towns: Berlin Township, Chesilhurst, Clementon, Lindenwold, Pine Hill, Waterford, and Winslow.
NEWS
May 10, 1995 | by Marianne Costantinou and John F. Morrison Daily News Staff Writers
"Mudman" the flower child. "Mudman" with a green thumb. Somehow, the images clash with the police description of this big, burly, bearded and tattooed anti-social biker with a rap sheet as long as a climbing wisteria. Yet, there he was, daintily opening a sunflower, swigging cider with prison do-gooders, looking like a Neanderthal trying to smile as he discussed, of all things, gardening. Robert R. "Mudman" Simon, 43, who once put a bullet through the head of a girlfriend who wouldn't have sex with his buddies and is suspected of killing a cop in New Jersey Saturday night, worked in the organic garden outside Graterford prison, where he was serving a sentence for murder.
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To those in the garment trade, Jack Marine comes from a family that peddles chic, recycled jeans to upscale shoppers. But to those in the 7-and-under set, he's not a businessman, or even Mr. Marine. He's Jack the Gardener. Marine, 40, took on this label a few years back doing what he loves best - raising vegetables in the backyard of his Main Line ranch house, teaching his children how to garden and sharing his knowledge and his produce with neighbors. What started as a hobby is evolving into a change of careers and lifestyle for him, his wife, Shelley, and their two young children.
NEWS
December 16, 2002 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
When he listens to Christian music and reads the Bible, Alfred, 13, says he finds peace. And he regularly attends church. Alfred is in sixth grade, and his last report card had all A's and B's. He enjoys singing with the school chorus. His social worker said: "Just bring a game out and he'll play it. " He likes Monopoly, Scrabble and card games. Other interests include swimming, riding a bike, listening to music on the radio, and dancing if no one's around to see him. He also likes cooking, especially eggs and toast, and baking cookies.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Got a green thumb, a hose and some shears? Pennsylvania needs someone to take care of its palm trees. Yes, palm trees - a dozen of them tucked into the "conservatory" and cafeteria areas of the Capitol's east wing, the $124-million addition to the Capitol that was built a few years ago. State officials are searching for someone to maintain the dozen gangly palms and a smattering of other flowering plants and foliage for the next three...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
DID YOU know you could save anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a year by growing your own vegetables? They will be fresher and tastier than store-bought, too. And you don't need a huge plot of land; many varieties can be grown in containers. My lovely mother-in-law, who has a green thumb and a wonderful vegetable garden of her own, has agreed to school me on the fine art of home-growing fruits and vegetables. Here are the five I plan to start with: 1. CUCUMBERS A good source of B vitamins.
NEWS
August 12, 1996 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Gina Graney never had a green thumb. No matter what she did, the plants she so carefully nurtured didn't make it. But as she lay near death in a hospital bed 11 years ago, a friend gave her a philodendron. Not only did Graney recover, but the plant flourished, so much so that she took cuttings of it and eventually raised another plant. Graney links her miraculous recovery to the equally miraculous survival of the philodendron. Now, she can even get other plants to survive.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 6, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
IN THE MIDST of Powelton, pawpaws grow. Nanking cherries are harvested and persimmons thrive as chickens lay eggs among the nearby vegetable gardens inside an oasis. "Can we have all the pleasures that country people have and still be a five-minute bike ride to the theater? Yes, we can," said Joe Revlock. Revlock, 63, is the co-founder of the Summer Winter Community Garden in Powelton, one of many community gardens that exist throughout the city under the protection of the newly restructured Neighborhood Gardens Trust, born out of the now defunct Neighborhood Gardens Association.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
GREEN THUMBS will be wiggling with delight at the art-themed Philadelphia Flower Show, opening today through March 9 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Feeling the itch yourself? Jump-start your spring growing indoors, with a little help from these cool gizmos. Parrot Flower Power: If only our plants could share their needs and feelings. They can with this smart plant sensor, designed by the French gadget wizards at Parrot. It's programmed on and read back on a companion app for Apple iOS tablets and smartphones.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Be honest. What kind of gardener comes to mind when you hear the word "greenhouse"? Probably not guys like Ed Egolf, a truck driver in Shermans Dale, in rural Perry County, northwest of Harrisburg. But his zest for growing tomatoes and peppers from seed indoors rivals any you'll find in elite horticulture circles. "When you're in the greenhouse working on something, focusing on that, nothing else really matters," he says cheerily. Though a popular fantasy, greenhouses aren't for everyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
DID YOU know you could save anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a year by growing your own vegetables? They will be fresher and tastier than store-bought, too. And you don't need a huge plot of land; many varieties can be grown in containers. My lovely mother-in-law, who has a green thumb and a wonderful vegetable garden of her own, has agreed to school me on the fine art of home-growing fruits and vegetables. Here are the five I plan to start with: 1. CUCUMBERS A good source of B vitamins.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013
Inquirer staff writer Virginia Smith is writing this week from the Philadelphia Flower Show. These posts appeared on her blog, "Kiss the Earth," at philly.com/kisstheearth. Read her stories at philly.com/ginny, and other Flower Show coverage at philly.com/flowershow. Princess Beatrice would be so bored She'd be so bored in Room 201C at the show, the Make and Take room. I mean, this is the gal who showed up at William and Kate's 2011 wedding in a headpiece - known as a fascinator - described as "a beige toilet seat," "antlers," and, kindly, "a pretzel-shaped bow. " It was unbelievable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012
Tovah Martin doesn't fuss over decorator colors on the walls of her Roxbury, Conn., home. She doesn't bother with window treatments or family portraits. Houseplants - hundreds of them - are what define her decor. Martin, author of more than a dozen gardening books, including The New Terrarium in 2009, has a new one from Timber Press ($22.95) called The Unexpected Houseplant: 220 Extraordinary Choices For Every Spot in Your Home . She's one of the best known and most knowledgeable garden authors in the country.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
RONALD NICHOLS' idea of a break from his demanding job as groundskeeper at West Philadelphia High School during football season was to stand on the sidelines during games and try to yell louder than the coaches.   And he did. Ronald not only kept the grounds in pristine condition, but he was devoted to the school, especially its sports programs. He knew the players and coaches and they knew him as a supporter and father figure. His shouts of encouragement to the players resounded across the field.
NEWS
July 23, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Thinnes insists he's "a basic gardener," but in truth, he's an inspiration to empty-nesters, suburbanites, and all the folks out there who wish they'd been "born with a green thumb. " Though he has a Ph.D. in group dynamics, Thinnes knew nothing about gardening when he started his grand project a decade ago. So, he attacked it like a true academic: He studied up; asked the experts a lot of questions; came up with a plan; and began to build, step by step, year after year. Today, Thinnes and his wife, Kathleen, enjoy an astonishing quarter-acre garden in their backyard in Ramblegate, a conventional tract-house development in Hatfield that was built in 1972.
LIVING
April 17, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Seton Corboy grew up with private schooling, braces, and piano lessons, everything her parents thought would ensure a "clean-fingernail future. " As cofounder of Greensgrow Farms, a 3/4-acre farm and nursery in the middle of Kensington, Corboy barely has time for a personal life - bowling every Tuesday is "an excuse to see friends and drink beer" - let alone froufrou nails. Over 11 years, she's done her share of "bone-grinding, blister-making" work in the dirt. But these days, she spends way more time in the office at Greensgrow.
NEWS
March 26, 2008
More communities should follow the example of Cherry Hill Township, which has approved a "green action plan" to boost recycling and reduce its energy costs. The progressive plan includes installing solar panels on the township municipal building, replacing old light bulbs with low-energy, longer-lasting bulbs, and giving residents incentives to recycle. The expansion of Cherry Hill's successful pilot recycling program to the entire township should have a significant impact on the environment.
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