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Greenhouse

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NEWS
September 19, 1993 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township supervisors have voted unanimously to restrict residents from building commercial greenhouses on properties of less than 10 acres. James J. Garrity, township solicitor, said the new ordinance, which takes effect immediately, was needed because two residents wanted to build two large commercial greenhouses next to homes. "We don't want a huge greenhouse on a real small lot," he said at the Wednesday night meeting. The vote was 3-0. Garrity said the supervisors reduced the restriction from 25 to 10 acres after James Boswell, who owns a nursery on Kriebel Mill Road, complained at the July hearing.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Last winter brought double joy to Franklin and Barbara Shores - their first baby arrived, and they completed a greenhouse. By profession a conservator of works of art on paper, Franklin Shores has become a gardener by avocation. Encouraged by a neighbor, who had developed a garden on the rooftop adjacent to the family's Philadelphia house near the Italian Market, Shores has caught a bad case of gardening fever. Frustrated by the shortness of Philadelphia's gardening season, Shores, a compulsive Mr. Fix-It-and-Build-It, decided it was time to turn this into a year-round activity by building a greenhouse.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
The owners of Linvilla Orchards in Middletown Township plan to ask for a variance to allow the construction of a 14,000-square-foot greenhouse on the property. The Linvills want to grow plants, including pansies and primrose, in the greenhouse and sell them. Linvilla Orchards already sells Christmas trees and poinsettias. Linvilla Orchards, off Knowlton Road, is owned by Paul and Peg Linvill. Steve Linvill, the owners' son, said he also hoped to use the greenhouse as part of the schoolchildren tour program.
FOOD
May 14, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
An early impression of the Greenhouse was that it was one of those Main Line restaurants that banked on a two-martini fog to keep diners from being too picky about what they found on their plates. The ambience has always been just dandy, however. Flowers, ferns, glass walls and a pretty patio set the scene for romance and/or relaxation. They still do. But now, there is the bonus of decent food. When competition proved that you could attract and keep crowds with good eats, the Greenhouse became an Aliza Green house.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A small solar greenhouse that was built behind the borough school nearly 20 years ago by the former shop teacher, Cleve Bryan, has matured enough to have its own curriculum. The 15-by-25-foot greenhouse has been used sporadically over the years to teach students the basics of growing plants, school board president William Stauts said. "By adopting a curriculum, we will make sure it continues to be used every year instead of periodically falling into disuse," he said. The board action was taken last week.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | By Nicholas Wishart, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The multimillion-dollar containment project has been completed, and the landfill has been put to bed. Don't look for it to sleep, however. Instead, expect it to serve as an energy source for years and years to come. As part of an agreement several years ago between the state and the freeholders, methane gas from the Florence Land Recontouring site, which is now covered, will be used at the nearby Burlington County Resource Recovery Complex to grow tomatoes. Completion of the covering of the recontouring site was announced yesterday by the state Department of Environmental Protection and Energy.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State-of-the-art greenhouse equipment seized during a Chester drug bust will soon be used to grow vegetables and legal herbs in Philadelphia, In May, Chester police found a sophisticated marijuana-growing operation inside a former drug store. They confiscated 80 hydroponically-grown plants, small industrial generators, grow lights, large plastic tubs, 55 gallon drums, hosed Miracle Grow containers and other items, said the Delaware County district attorney office Tuesday.
NEWS
November 14, 1993 | By Stanley M. Brown, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1989, Don and Jane Eyre of Medford sank some money into a vacant greenhouse in Berlin Township, with full intentions of establishing a plant- and-garden business. Within a couple of months, they changed their minds. Instead of dusting, watering and selling plants, Jane Eyre had visions of nurturing something else - artists. Eyre, an artist herself, converted the greenhouse into an art studio, a place where both established and aspiring artists could go to meet, create, and showcase their talents.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Several residents have objected to a proposed greenhouse-nursery business on Calcon Hook Road, prompting the Darby Township Board of Commissioners to delay action on the facility until a horticulturist can address their concerns. Ernest R. Roth, president of Valley Forge Engineering Inc. of Villanova, said that in addition to the nine greenhouses proposed for the former sewage treatment plant property on Calcon Hook Road, the site might be used as a horticulture technician-training center for unemployed minorities.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It wasn't just the taste of tea prepared from his own mint leaves that attracted Raymond Marano to gardening. "I escape, to a certain degree, by being in this program . . . "I'm freer than being on a (cell) block with 500 people, making noise. " As he talked of freedom and escape one morning last week, Marano walked past personal gardens grown by inmates at Graterford Prison in central Montgomery County. Marano, 35, has spent seven years behind prison walls, for a crime that he declines to discuss.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOUTH HARRISON It was the second day of spring, and the sun beamed into the South Harrison greenhouse as a small contingent of volunteer gardeners filed in throughout the early morning. Sheltered from the chill, the Gloucester County master gardeners worked to the faint sound of spraying hoses and the quiet buzzing of fans. "It cheers you up," said retired teacher Barbara Trueheart, 62, of Washington Township. Another gardener likened the county facility to Oz, a magical place where the gardeners - volunteers under Rutgers University's county cooperative extension - can always escape the bitterness outside.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Be honest. What kind of gardener comes to mind when you hear the word "greenhouse"? Probably not guys like Ed Egolf, a truck driver in Shermans Dale, in rural Perry County, northwest of Harrisburg. But his zest for growing tomatoes and peppers from seed indoors rivals any you'll find in elite horticulture circles. "When you're in the greenhouse working on something, focusing on that, nothing else really matters," he says cheerily. Though a popular fantasy, greenhouses aren't for everyone.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a Philadelphia woman was sentenced to be hanged after poisoning her husband and two children in 1888, an early pioneer in the field of mental health came to her defense. Psychiatrist Alice Bennett argued that the murderer's "weak brain" had been further impaired by "periodical congestions at the menstrual periods. " Intrigued? Soak up all you can in 10 minutes, because then it's onto another topic. The use of X-rays to uncover forgeries of Old Masters paintings. A deadly disease that was intertwined with commerce and war. A botanist who built a majestic greenhouse in post-Revolutionary War Philadelphia without benefit of running water or electricity.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
We buried my mother on a January day - into the slope of a hill, under the naked arms of trees, beneath broken earth and petals. Everything depended on where you stood. There was sun, and there was shadow. There was warmth, and there was chill. I had felt my mother's spirit lift on the night she passed away. I felt it hover, still. Later my father and I would design a red-granite headstone - birds taking flight, lambs seeking rest, a tree in full flower. Later my father would build her a garden - daffodils, phlox, begonia - and on the scorched days (and with permission)
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Worldwide levels of the chief greenhouse gas that causes global warming have hit a milestone, reaching an amount never before encountered by humans, federal scientists said Friday. Carbon dioxide was measured at 400 parts per million at the oldest monitoring station, which is in Hawaii and sets the global benchmark. The last time the worldwide carbon level was probably that high was about two million years ago, said Pieter Tans of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
FOOD
April 19, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Lightfoot, marathon runner and local food zealot, is determined to change the way highly perishable, expensive-to-ship produce is grown and distributed to supermarkets in the Northeast and other parts of the nation. Starting in Yardley. As CEO of BrightFarms Inc., a big-picture company with a hyper-local focus, Lightfoot wants to "create beautiful local produce, near grocery retailers, that's thousands of miles fresher, and do it with the same food safety and year-round commercial volume as a large, centralized supplier might have been doing from a huge facility in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | Howard Gensler
In making a documentary to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Michael Jackson's "Bad," director Spike Lee says combing through footage was like opening a "treasure chest of findings. " "We have footage in this documentary that no one's ever seen, stuff that Michael shot himself, behind-the-scenes stuff," he said in an interview with the Associated Press. "We had complete access to the vaults of Michael Jackson. ... He wrote 60 demos for the ‘Bad' record. Only 11 made it. So we got to hear a lot of that stuff, too, so it was just a great experience.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Mitchell Bentley, 87, owner of the former Greenhouse restaurant in Radnor from 1975 to 1993, died Thursday, March 29, of complications from cancer at her home in Radnor. Her son James said in a phone interview that running the restaurant was even more of a life-changing event than it might have been for some others. "In terms of a job as we know it, she hadn't worked" at any job since World War II, when she was a general's driver in the Marine Corps Women's Reserve.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Brosius is trying to be heard above the buzz of a dozen small children recently liberated from day care. "Who wants some black-seeded Simpson?" he shouts, holding up the ruffled, light green leaves of this 150-year-old lettuce variety. In a room full of veteran vegetable gardeners, this would provoke a stampede. Here, in a small classroom at Awbury Arboretum in Germantown, the kids have no idea what black-seeded means or who Simpson was. But they know whatever "Mr. Howard" is offering, they want.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven Pennsylvania coal-fired power plants are among the 100 highest industrial emitters of greenhouse gases in the United States, according to data released Wednesday by the federal Environmental Protection Agency. Ranking 12th on the national list is FirstEnergy Generation Corp.'s Bruce Mansfield plant in Beaver County, the state's biggest. The other plants are Brunner Island, Conemaugh, Hatfield's Ferry, Homer City, Keystone, and Montour. No New Jersey plants made that top 100 list.
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