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Greenhouse Effect

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NEWS
January 1, 1987 | By Walter Truett Anderson, Pacific News Service
When historians of the future look back on 1986, they may well conclude that the biggest news story of the year was the one that barely made it onto the front pages: a sudden increase in global concern about the "greenhouse effect. " It is not news that various human activities such as increasing use of fossil fuels cause a buildup of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gases in the atmosphere. The gases reflect heat back to Earth, producing a gradual rise in surface temperature. They also damage the ozone layer, which filters out cancer-causing ultraviolet radiation.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | By Steven Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In his first public remarks as secretary of state, James A. Baker 3d yesterday urged representatives from 17 countries to act swiftly to counter the dangers of the global warming trend by increasing energy efficiency and reducing harmful gas emissions. "This is a transnational issue," Baker told participants at a two-day international conference on the greenhouse effect. "We all are in the same boat. " While much is unknown about the greenhouse effect - in which emissions from cars, smokestacks and other sources help trap heat close to the Earth's surface - Baker said the time for action is now. "We probably cannot afford to wait until all of the uncertainties have been resolved," he said.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | By Steven Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau
There's no time to wait for governmental action to stop global warming, a coalition of environmental and civic groups said yesterday, and it released a list of 101 do-it-yourself steps to curb the "greenhouse" effect. The steps range from switching to energy-saving light bulbs to eating less red meat. "While there's a great deal of talk about legislation and global summits, there has been too little talk of what we can do in our own homes," said Jeremy Rifkin, president of the Greenhouse Crisis Foundation.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Robert T. Stafford walks slowly, leaning on a cane. He is 75 years old. In a few weeks, after 41 years in public office, the political career of the Republican senator from Vermont will be over. In his final weeks in Congress, Stafford once again rises to sound a warning he has issued again and again. "For too long, those who warned about global climate change were thought of as radicals warning about the end of the world. But . . . 1988 is a taste of things to come," Stafford warned.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | By Steven Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Hurricane Gilbert may be the first of increasingly frequent and intense storms spawned by rising ocean temperatures brought on by the "greenhouse effect," a Senate subcommittee was told yesterday. "One consequence of increased ocean temperatures is more intense storms than we have ever seen," said Carl Wunsch, a professor of physical oceanography at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He told the Senate subcommittee on hazardous wastes and toxic substances that even small increases in ocean surface temperatures, of 1 or 2 degrees Celsius, could "lead to very much more intense and very much more frequent hurricanes.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Scientists know a lot less about the "greenhouse effect" than the news media may have led you to believe during the long, hot summer. To be sure, there is no debate among atmospheric scientists that a greenhouse effect exists. It is a fact of nature, it is getting worse and it almost certainly will cause the Earth's climate to warm up. But warm up how much? How fast? With what impact? On those critical questions, scientists disagree. The skeptics raise serious doubts about the greenhouse effect on a half- dozen counts.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | By John K. Adams
Twelve thousand years ago when nomadic hunter-gatherers collected shellfish at the New Jersey shore, the coastline was 65 miles farther out than it is today. What was beachfront then is now under water. Sea level has been rising for the last 15,000 years since the time the last great ice sheets that covered much of North America, Asia, Europe and the southern oceans began to melt. But this natural process of sea reclaiming land is being accelerated by a legacy of the Industrial Age - the greenhouse effect.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The greenhouse effect will cause major changes in American agriculture during the next 45 years, shifting croplands northward and substantially increasing the demand for irrigation, according to a study being published today in Nature. The study in the prestigious British science journal found that the buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could be economically beneficial to many American farmers because it increases the yields of crops such as soybeans, wheat and corn. But Cynthia Rosenzweig, one of the paper's 10 authors and an agronomist at Columbia University, said the public should not "wax optimistic" about this study.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Earth is as warm now as it has been in 6,000 to 8,000 years and is expected to become the warmest it has been in human history by the middle of the 21st century, a British scientist reported yesterday. Thomas Wigley, a climatologist at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, told a Senate subcommittee that within the next 50 years the Earth's temperatures would be warmer than they had been in two million years and that "mankind will be living in a world whose climate differs radically from anything in human memory.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
A United Nations draft report, now circulating among government officials and scientists around the world, warns that "unavoidable" climate change could warm the planet about 7 degrees Fahrenheit and cause oceans to rise about 1 1/2 feet in the next 80 years. The panel calculated "with confidence" that to stabilize the planet there would have to be at least a 50 percent reduction in the man-made gases building up in the atmosphere that are creating the warming trend. If such stabilization does not occur, the report says that Earth, by the year 2070, will likely become hotter than it has been in 100,000 years.
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NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to public understanding of climate change - the forecast is hazy with a 90 percent chance of confusion. Is it a threat to life as we know it? Is it a hoax perpetrated by some bicycle-riding, SUV-hating, tofu-eating eggheads? In Copenhagen, President Obama is scheduled to speak on Friday as world leaders continue to work out strategies to curb the world's ever-increasing carbon emissions. Meanwhile, critics are still pointing to a cache of leaked e-mails that hackers stole from climate scientists.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to public understanding of climate change - the forecast is hazy with a 90 percent chance of confusion. Is it a threat to life as we know it? Is it a hoax perpetrated by some bicycle-riding, SUV-hating, tofu-eating eggheads? In Copenhagen, President Obama is scheduled to speak on Friday as world leaders continue to work out strategies to curb the world's ever-increasing carbon emissions. Meanwhile, critics are still pointing to a cache of leaked e-mails that hackers stole from climate scientists.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Never mind that Atlantic City will be underwater and the rest of us blown away by hurricanes. Here's another threat associated with global warming: giant poison ivy vines. And for those who come in contact with them, a more vigorous version of the horrendously itchy and ugly rash. For decades, foresters have noted the increased abundance of woody vines. They suspected rising levels of carbon dioxide, which fuels photosynthesis. Now, researchers who spent six years monitoring plots of poison ivy in the Duke University forest - to their eventual discomfort - have proved it. Lead researcher Jacqueline E. Mohan was a Duke doctoral student when she picked poison ivy for her study because, as only a scientist might say, it is "a very special type of plant.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | by Gregg Easterbrook
Fourteen-year-old girls everywhere can breathe now that ABC News has decided to go ahead and broadcast its Earth Day special in which Leonardo DiCaprio, crusading journalist, questions President Clinton about global warming. Personally, I know I'll be waiting for his question on the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change science-assessment revisions, especially as they apply to new studies on ocean-current fluid dynamics when compared to the watts-per-square-foot forcing of anthropogenic gases, and how this will affect the Kyoto Annex I plans for joint implementation of carbon sequestration.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A small solar greenhouse that was built behind the borough school nearly 20 years ago by the former shop teacher, Cleve Bryan, has matured enough to have its own curriculum. The 15-by-25-foot greenhouse has been used sporadically over the years to teach students the basics of growing plants, school board president William Stauts said. "By adopting a curriculum, we will make sure it continues to be used every year instead of periodically falling into disuse," he said. The board action was taken last week.
NEWS
July 5, 1995 | By Albert DiBartolomeo
All my life, I have been prone to worry and, although I still have a good head of hair, my worries have afflicted me so much in other ways that I have resolved not to worry anymore. I'm through with worrying about the environment, for one. The chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that have chewed a big hole in the ozone layer are being phased out, finally, but there are still enough in the sky, doing their damage. The ultraviolet radiation and its pernicious effects on human skin and crops will be pouring down upon us for years to come.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The global warming treaty hammered out in the small hours of the morning at the United Nations last weekend does several things. It provides a diplomatic centerpiece for the Earth Summit conference in Rio de Janeiro next month. It ensures that President Bush will attend the conference. And it frames the international debate on how to control the pollution thought to contribute to the "greenhouse effect. " What it doesn't do is solve the problem of global warming. The treaty - expected to be signed by heads of state in Rio - calls for each nation to report on its emissions of man-made greenhouse gases and its plans to reduce them.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
From the minute you plop your feet onto the painted footprints in front of the TV screen, you know something different is going on. As you begin waving your arms, you get to see what is usually invisible: heat and cold. At the Franklin Institute Science Museum's hot new exhibit, this television screen is next to a camera that "sees" heat rays. So if your hands are cold, they look deep midnight blue or black on the television screen. If your face or arms are warmer, they look orange-red.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | MichaeL Lacing
FOR A GOOD TIME . . . In 1968, TV sound bites of candidates lasted 42.8 seconds and in 1988, it was down to 9.8. Soon, all we'll see is their picture with these words underneath: "Call me at 976-1111, and I'll tell you what you want to hear. " PAT AT THE WHEEL Pat Buchanan, who's been on the president for allowing so many foreign cars into America, drives a Mercedes. In Buchanan's defense, Germany is his second favorite country. BUT DOES IT RUN? What do American automakers and the Sixers management have in common?
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | By NEAL PEIRCE
Cities of the world are telegraphing a strong message to organizers of "Earth Summit," the United Nations' big Conference on the Environment and Development to be held next June in Rio de Janeiro. Cities want the 166 national delegations to Rio, many led by presidents and prime ministers, to recognize that without healthy cities, the entire globe may get very sick. They want cities high on the conference agenda, right up there with global warming, deforestation, desertification, the loss of animal and plant species.
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