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NEWS
March 29, 2005 | By GREG VITALI
ON FEB. 15, the eve of the effective date of the Kyoto Treaty on global warming, I introduced the Pennsylvania Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act (H.B. 500), which would represent an important first step for Pennsylvania in addressing global climate change. Our federal government's failure to sign on to Kyoto makes it even more important for individual states to take action. Pennsylvania has a particular responsibility to act. Our state alone produces about 1 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, more than 105 developing nations combined.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many who spoke up at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's public meeting here last week on limiting carbon pollution from power plants - no matter which side they took - it all came down to this: their children. "It's time to clean up the air for the health of our children," said Gretchen Dahlkemper-Alfonso, a Philadelphia mother of three and a leader of the environmental group Moms Clean Air Force. Bryan Palko was worried about his offspring, too, but for a different reason.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The U.S.-European rift on global warming extends to the world's three dominant oil companies. BP Amoco P.L.C. and Royal Dutch/Shell Group, which are based in Europe, have joined the campaign to reduce global warming. Exxon Mobil Corp., which has its headquarters in Irving, Texas, remains outside the campaign, arguing in newspaper advertisements and speeches for a more cautious approach. President Bush will argue for the approach that Exxon Mobil prefers when he meets with European leaders today in Sweden.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is leaning toward revising its landmark proposal to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from new power plants, according to several individuals briefed on the matter, a move that would delay tougher restrictions and could anger many environmentalists. The discussions center on the first-ever greenhouse gas regulations for power plants, which were proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency nearly a year ago. Rewriting the proposal would significantly delay any action, and might allow the agency to set a separate standard for coal-fired power plants, which are roughly twice as polluting as those fueled by natural gas. While the move could bolster the administration's legal justification for regulating power plants' carbon emissions, any delay on the rules would be a blow to environmental groups and their supporters, who constituted a crucial voting bloc for President Obama and other Democrats in last year's elections.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
NO DEPOSIT, BUT BOTTLE DOES NET A SURPRISING RETURN Geoff Hight and his elementary school classmates in Portland, Maine, discovered that a bottle carrying a message really could cross the Atlantic Ocean when they received a letter back from a 13-year-old French girl. Amelie Kriskovic wrote to Geoff that she had found his bottle while walking with her father on the beach near their home in Pornichet, France, the Portland Press Herald reported yesterday. Geoff was among 21 fourth-grade students who sealed messages in wine bottles in the spring of 1992 and had them released off Portland by a fisherman in an experiment to learn more about the ocean and the Gulf Stream.
NEWS
July 10, 2008
The G-8 summit concluded yesterday in Japan, with headlines about a climate-change agreement - and that President Bush had signed it. A big shift for Bush, said the headlines. A first. Yes and no. It is notable that the president signed the accord, in which the eight nations agreed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent by the year 2050. It was the first time Bush ever signed anything agreeing to a numerical goal. He refused at last year's G-8. As president, Bush has opposed U.S. agreement to the Kyoto Protocols, has expressed doubts about climate science, and has regularly called reduction targets unrealistic.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
GLACIERS ARE shrinking so rapidly we might have to change the definition of the word "glacial. " To proceed at a glacial pace nowadays means to move backward at a rapidly accelerating rate - like, say, the Eagles. The process is chronicled in the new documentary "Chasing Ice," which uses time-lapse photography to show just how drastically fast ice sheets up yonder are turning to water, raising sea levels. But wait, you say, not all glaciers are receding. Some are advancing, right?
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Josh Lederman, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration laid out a blueprint Wednesday for the first regulations to cut down on methane emissions from new natural gas wells, aiming to curb the discharge of a potent greenhouse gas by roughly half. Relying once again on the Clean Air Act, the rules join a host of others that President Obama has ordered in an effort to slow global warming despite opposition to new laws in Congress that has only hardened since the midterm elections. Although just a sliver of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, methane is far more powerful than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
DEPARTING U.S. Environmental Protection Agency head Lisa Jackson did well by the public, especially with the tighter emissions rules she imposed on coal-fired power plants. But her successor will need to move Congress closer to meaningful legislation on climate change and rebuild the program that funds much of the nation's sewerage work. Ms. Jackson, the first African American to lead the EPA, helped secure landmark fuel-efficiency standards for autos. She infused new life in the agency after eight years of foot-dragging and rollbacks by former President George W. Bush's administration.
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NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Josh Lederman, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration laid out a blueprint Wednesday for the first regulations to cut down on methane emissions from new natural gas wells, aiming to curb the discharge of a potent greenhouse gas by roughly half. Relying once again on the Clean Air Act, the rules join a host of others that President Obama has ordered in an effort to slow global warming despite opposition to new laws in Congress that has only hardened since the midterm elections. Although just a sliver of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, methane is far more powerful than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
LUSBY, Md. - Not many ships dock these days at the gigantic Dominion Resources pier that sprouts out of the Chesapeake Bay here, about a mile off Maryland's western shore. Since the American shale-gas boom began, there has been little call for imports of liquefied natural gas for which this pier and a massive onshore processing plant opened 36 years ago. The pier, which can accommodate two 1,100-foot LNG tankers simultaneously, is mostly home for a raucous and untidy colony of gulls, well-fed from a nearby landfill.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many who spoke up at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's public meeting here last week on limiting carbon pollution from power plants - no matter which side they took - it all came down to this: their children. "It's time to clean up the air for the health of our children," said Gretchen Dahlkemper-Alfonso, a Philadelphia mother of three and a leader of the environmental group Moms Clean Air Force. Bryan Palko was worried about his offspring, too, but for a different reason.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Worldwide levels of the chief greenhouse gas that causes global warming have hit a milestone, reaching an amount never before encountered by humans, federal scientists said Friday. Carbon dioxide was measured at 400 parts per million at the oldest monitoring station, which is in Hawaii and sets the global benchmark. The last time the worldwide carbon level was probably that high was about two million years ago, said Pieter Tans of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is leaning toward revising its landmark proposal to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from new power plants, according to several individuals briefed on the matter, a move that would delay tougher restrictions and could anger many environmentalists. The discussions center on the first-ever greenhouse gas regulations for power plants, which were proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency nearly a year ago. Rewriting the proposal would significantly delay any action, and might allow the agency to set a separate standard for coal-fired power plants, which are roughly twice as polluting as those fueled by natural gas. While the move could bolster the administration's legal justification for regulating power plants' carbon emissions, any delay on the rules would be a blow to environmental groups and their supporters, who constituted a crucial voting bloc for President Obama and other Democrats in last year's elections.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
DEPARTING U.S. Environmental Protection Agency head Lisa Jackson did well by the public, especially with the tighter emissions rules she imposed on coal-fired power plants. But her successor will need to move Congress closer to meaningful legislation on climate change and rebuild the program that funds much of the nation's sewerage work. Ms. Jackson, the first African American to lead the EPA, helped secure landmark fuel-efficiency standards for autos. She infused new life in the agency after eight years of foot-dragging and rollbacks by former President George W. Bush's administration.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
GLACIERS ARE shrinking so rapidly we might have to change the definition of the word "glacial. " To proceed at a glacial pace nowadays means to move backward at a rapidly accelerating rate - like, say, the Eagles. The process is chronicled in the new documentary "Chasing Ice," which uses time-lapse photography to show just how drastically fast ice sheets up yonder are turning to water, raising sea levels. But wait, you say, not all glaciers are receding. Some are advancing, right?
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - In a surprising turnaround, the amount of carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere in the United States has fallen dramatically, to its lowest level in 20 years, and government officials say the biggest reason is that cheap and plentiful natural gas has led many power plant operators to switch from dirtier-burning coal. Many of the world's leading climate scientists didn't see the drop coming, in large part because it happened as a result of market forces rather than direct government action against carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that traps heat in the atmosphere.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | Vance Lehmkuhl
FUNNY THING about the lists of "helpful planet-saving tips" that show up as Earth Day (Sunday) approaches: They rarely include, much less spotlight, the daily action that could have the most impact: cutting down your meat and dairy consumption. The United Nations has repeatedly stated that we must drastically change our eating patterns, given that somewhere from 18 percent (if you credit the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization 2006 estimate) to 51 percent (Worldwatch Institute's estimate, 2009)
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