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Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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NEWS
February 14, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one of the most ambitious governmental actions yet taken on global warming, Gov. Corzine yesterday signed an executive order calling for his state to dramatically cut its greenhouse-gas emissions. Under the order, New Jersey would cut its emissions to 1990 levels - a reduction of 20 percent - by 2020. It calls for a total 80 percent reduction by 2050. "Today we have taken steps to preserve our planet for our children and grandchildren by adopting aggressive goals for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions," Corzine said in a press release.
NEWS
April 4, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court's groundbreaking decision that regulation of so-called greenhouse gases appears to fall under the Clean Air Act is expected to have far-reaching consequences. But for New Jersey and Pennsylvania, experts said yesterday, the biggest impact of Monday's ruling is likely to be what they won't experience - legal challenges to their programs to mandate cleaner-burning cars. Both states have enacted rules based on California legislation that regulates carbon-dioxide emissions from passenger cars and light trucks.
NEWS
December 6, 2009 | By Ben Lieberman
A new global-warming treaty would be all economic pain and little environmental gain for America even if China and other fast-developing nations sign on. But if developing nations remain exempted, it would be all economic pain and no environmental gain. Either way, America should stay out! At the United Nations' Conference on Climate Change in Copenhagen this week, proponents of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol - which expires in 2012 - will try to hash out a new agreement for lowering carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-gas emissions.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein and Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
More than 50 U.S. companies are not waiting for White House action on global warming. They are following Europe's lead, and are cutting emissions, an issue that President Bush will hear a lot about when he meets with European leaders today. A growing number of American companies - including DuPont Co., of Wilmington, Del.; General Motors Corp., International Business Machines Corp. and Eastman Kodak Co. - are pledging to cut or limit their emissions of greenhouse gases, which most scientists say cause global warming.
NEWS
December 6, 2007 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As part of the world's carbon footprint, Montgomery County doesn't even constitute as much as a toe. But the county wants to make an even smaller impression. So today, its commissioners are expected to take a rare step and adopt a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a variety of ways. No other county in Pennsylvania or South Jersey has done so. "It's really groundbreaking . . . and is a real model for what other counties or regional bodies can do," said Brian Hill, president of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council, a statewide nonprofit advocacy group.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey is poised to take on global warming with a plan that imposes some of the nation's strictest limits on greenhouse-gas emissions. Under legislation overwhelmingly approved last week by the Assembly and Senate, the state would cut its emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 and to 80 percent of last year's levels by 2050. The bill would set into law the recommendations Gov. Corzine made in February via executive order and now awaits his signature. The plan puts New Jersey at the forefront of a growing number of states imposing their own global-warming crackdowns while citing an absence of federal leadership.
NEWS
January 22, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Climate change is by nature a global problem. So when a Pennsylvania State University graduate student presented Montgomery County officials with a 145-page report on what it could do to reduce greenhouse gases - the culprits in global warming - Commissioner Thomas Jay Ellis was skeptical. Could one county - even one with more people than some states - make a difference in such a huge problem? Ellis and his fellow commissioners decided this month that it could at least try. Montgomery County, which emits more greenhouse gases than more than half the world's nations do individually, thereby joined a burgeoning list of cities, counties and states that have stopped waiting for federal direction on global-warming remediation.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
President Obama's new initiative to combat climate change could help New Jersey achieve its aggressive goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, even as some of the state's programs to deal with the problem have been curtailed in recent years, according to environmentalists. In a major policy announcement Tuesday, the president outlined steps to require reductions in carbon dioxide emissions from power plants, to curb greenhouse gas emissions from heavy trucks, and to develop more energy-efficiency standards for appliances and buildings.
NEWS
July 26, 2011
Monday's "GreenSpace" column gave incorrect equivalents in English measure for a new report about eating and climate change. The report ranked foods according to greenhouse-gas emissions per kilogram of food - which is equal to 2.2 pounds. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
September 16, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's five nuclear power plants contribute about $2.4 billion to the state's economy, and the industry supports 15,600 direct and indirect jobs, according to a study commissioned by the advocacy group Nuclear Matters. The state's greenhouse gas emissions would be about 52 million tons greater if fossil-fuel plants replaced the carbon-free reactors, according to a report released Monday by The Brattle Group, a global consulting firm. The state report is part of a broader campaign by Nuclear Matters to build support for retaining the nation's atomic plants, which produce about 19 percent of America's electricity.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Mark Alan Hughes
Just because we can do something doesn't necessarily mean we should. Yet this homely admonition seems forgotten in the otherwise admirable efforts of cities and regions around the globe to create more sustainable energy policies. Since 2007, many governments have adopted a policy goal of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions by 80 percent by the year 2050. It's a goal based on solid science about what needs to happen in the Earth's atmosphere to avoid the worst effects of global warming: floods, famine, disease, war . . . the whole biblical catalog.
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Tomas Brannemo
Climate change is taking a toll on our nation. New government data confirms that 2015 was the second-hottest year on record in the United States. Record warmth contributed to 10 climate disasters last year, which cost billions of dollars and hundreds of lives. The United States just joined a global coalition to arrest climate change. At the United Nations Climate Change Conference in December, nearly 200 countries, including the United States, forged an agreement to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
ISSUE | ENERGY N.J.'s green goals The New Jersey Senate passed a bill last month that establishes renewable-energy portfolio standards and requires a percentage of our electricity to come from Class I renewable energy. This percentage would increase every five years to 2050, with a goal of reaching 80 percent renewable. The bill, which was referred to the Assembly Telecommunications and Utilities Committee, needs to be posted by Jan. 11 to pass the Assembly. Solar, wind, and geothermal power, microgrids, and wave technologies can be used to reach these goals.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is joining a coalition of 24 states, cities and counties seeking to intervene to defend the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's "Clean Power Plan" against legal challenge. The motion is in response to a flood of lawsuits from states and industry groups challenging the rule that would curb greenhouse-gas emissions. City Solicitor Shelley R. Smith said concerns about carbon emissions and climate change "make the Clean Power Plan a necessary regulation for protecting the health and safety and quality of life of our residents.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a call from coal producers to go slowly, Pennsylvania environmental regulators are steaming full speed ahead to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. "We view the Clean Power Plan as presenting some major opportunities for Pennsylvania," John Quigley, secretary of the state Department of Environmental Protection, said Wednesday at a "listening session" the DEP held in Philadelphia to gather public comment on its emissions-reduction strategy.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 100 faith leaders have launched a campaign, timed to Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia next week, urging Gov. Wolf to ban natural gas development. The clergy, joined by a coalition of anti-drilling groups called Pennsylvanians Against Fracking, say their call to Wolf was inspired by the pope's recent encyclical urging Catholics to take action against climate change. "Gov. Wolf, you have the opportunity and the obligation to act," the clergy said in a letter. "Shale gas development is not only putting us in an increasingly precarious position, it is also keeping us from making the necessary and urgent transition to clean, renewable energy.
NEWS
September 16, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's five nuclear power plants contribute about $2.4 billion to the state's economy, and the industry supports 15,600 direct and indirect jobs, according to a study commissioned by the advocacy group Nuclear Matters. The state's greenhouse gas emissions would be about 52 million tons greater if fossil-fuel plants replaced the carbon-free reactors, according to a report released Monday by The Brattle Group, a global consulting firm. The state report is part of a broader campaign by Nuclear Matters to build support for retaining the nation's atomic plants, which produce about 19 percent of America's electricity.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walt Moore's 850 cows lounge on beds of soft sand. They are cooled by spritzes of water and breezes generated by fans. They eat a custom-blended diet of gourmet grains that a computer tells Moore will suit them best. He orders sophisticated analyses of their rations and manure, getting the results on his iPhone, synced to his watch. Each cow wears a collar with a computer chip that keeps track of her milk production, nearly four times that of the cows his father once tended, not to mention those his great-grandfather started the family farm with in 1909.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
LUSBY, Md. - Not many ships dock these days at the gigantic Dominion Resources pier that sprouts out of the Chesapeake Bay here, about a mile off Maryland's western shore. Since the American shale-gas boom began, there has been little call for imports of liquefied natural gas for which this pier and a massive onshore processing plant opened 36 years ago. The pier, which can accommodate two 1,100-foot LNG tankers simultaneously, is mostly home for a raucous and untidy colony of gulls, well-fed from a nearby landfill.
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Monday, the Obama administration is expected to take one of its most significant steps yet toward addressing climate change, proposing a rule to limit carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. According to individuals briefed on the plan, the Environmental Protection Agency will propose cutting emissions by up to 30 percent compared with 2005 levels by 2030. The draft rule reportedly would give states and utilities options for how to meet the new standard. States could, for instance, require retrofits at coal plants and bolster energy-efficiency programs.
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