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Greenhouse Gas

NEWS
May 21, 2010
Clearing the air about greenhouse gases will be the focus of a public meeting on Thursday, the Chester County commissioners said in a news release. The meeting will include a presentation from the Chester County Greenhouse Gas Reduction Task Force. The 64-member group was formed in December 2007 to address climate change and recommend ways the county, municipalities, the private sector and individuals can continue to reduce greenhouse emissions, the release said. The meeting will be held in Courtroom One of the historic Courthouse, Market and High streets, West Chester, beginning at 6:30 p.m.    Kathleen Brady Shea
NEWS
July 26, 2011
Monday's "GreenSpace" column gave incorrect equivalents in English measure for a new report about eating and climate change. The report ranked foods according to greenhouse-gas emissions per kilogram of food - which is equal to 2.2 pounds. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
October 25, 2011
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Tuesday announced $4.4 million in grants to develop infrastructure for natural gas and electric vehicles. The grants, funded by the state's annual utilities gross receipts tax, will encourage the use of alternatives fuels for fleets and transit systems. Waste Management Inc. will receive $400,000 to help pay for a compressed natural gas fueling station in Bristol borough that DEP says will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2,238 tons per year.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walt Moore's 850 cows lounge on beds of soft sand. They are cooled by spritzes of water and breezes generated by fans. They eat a custom-blended diet of gourmet grains that a computer tells Moore will suit them best. He orders sophisticated analyses of their rations and manure, getting the results on his iPhone, synced to his watch. Each cow wears a collar with a computer chip that keeps track of her milk production, nearly four times that of the cows his father once tended, not to mention those his great-grandfather started the family farm with in 1909.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IF YOU WANTED fireworks, you're going to have to wait for the Fourth of July. The tone was low-key, but the policy contrasts were sharp as Gov. Corbett and his fall challenger, Tom Wolf, offered their visions for Pennsylvania's environment last night on a Philadelphia stage - their first joint appearance since Wolf won the Democratic nomination for governor last month. Speaking back-to-back to the Pennsylvania Environmental Council in Center City, the dueling Toms barely acknowledged one another - although the balding Wolf did offer the contrast that the ivory-topped Corbett has "too much hair on top of his head.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
Challenged by British Prime Minister Tony Blair to help slow global warming, President Bush responded Tuesday that "my administration isn't waiting around to deal with the issue; we're acting. " He's not acting fast enough for scientists, states and industry. They want more than the weak voluntary measures and calls for more research that Bush has reluctantly offered up for four years. The scientific academies of 11 countries, including the United States, released a joint letter Tuesday calling on all nations to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, which contribute to global warming.
NEWS
November 26, 2001
The latest round of negotiations over international climate change policies has concluded, and once again, the United States is taking heat for holding back its support .. . .Though advocates of greenhouse gas reduction treaties will continue to flagellate the United States for its refusal to participate, and portray us as an arrogant and irresponsible force of global destruction, the Bush administration's decision is the right one.. . . The United States [has] only a certain amount of resources to invest in protecting us from all the risks we face.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein and Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
More than 50 U.S. companies are not waiting for White House action on global warming. They are following Europe's lead, and are cutting emissions, an issue that President Bush will hear a lot about when he meets with European leaders today. A growing number of American companies - including DuPont Co., of Wilmington, Del.; General Motors Corp., International Business Machines Corp. and Eastman Kodak Co. - are pledging to cut or limit their emissions of greenhouse gases, which most scientists say cause global warming.
NEWS
March 20, 2006
THE MOST immediate danger to our global environment is our weakened perception of threat. Many people like to simply deny that a problem exists. These people hate to think about the future. Why should they? Kurt Vonnegut calls these people "PP's (psychopathic personalities) a medical term for smart, personable people who have no consciences. " Our senator from Pennsylvania, Rick Santorum, is such a person. In 2005, he voted against requiring power plants to cut their greenhouse gas emissions and electric utilities to generate 10 percent of electricity from renewable sources.
NEWS
June 16, 2005
RE SENS. McCain and Lieberman promoting nuclear power in the global-warming amendment they plan to add to the Senate energy plan: Although the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is an important goal, giving more than $5 billion in government subsidies to nuclear power is not the best way to solve this problem. Nuclear technology is expensive, and nuclear waste remains lethal for generations. Re-introducing this long-abandoned option will not be the most efficient way to combat global warming.
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