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NEWS
July 26, 2011
Monday's "GreenSpace" column gave incorrect equivalents in English measure for a new report about eating and climate change. The report ranked foods according to greenhouse-gas emissions per kilogram of food - which is equal to 2.2 pounds. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
October 25, 2011
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Tuesday announced $4.4 million in grants to develop infrastructure for natural gas and electric vehicles. The grants, funded by the state's annual utilities gross receipts tax, will encourage the use of alternatives fuels for fleets and transit systems. Waste Management Inc. will receive $400,000 to help pay for a compressed natural gas fueling station in Bristol borough that DEP says will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2,238 tons per year.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
Challenged by British Prime Minister Tony Blair to help slow global warming, President Bush responded Tuesday that "my administration isn't waiting around to deal with the issue; we're acting. " He's not acting fast enough for scientists, states and industry. They want more than the weak voluntary measures and calls for more research that Bush has reluctantly offered up for four years. The scientific academies of 11 countries, including the United States, released a joint letter Tuesday calling on all nations to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, which contribute to global warming.
NEWS
November 26, 2001
The latest round of negotiations over international climate change policies has concluded, and once again, the United States is taking heat for holding back its support .. . .Though advocates of greenhouse gas reduction treaties will continue to flagellate the United States for its refusal to participate, and portray us as an arrogant and irresponsible force of global destruction, the Bush administration's decision is the right one.. . . The United States [has] only a certain amount of resources to invest in protecting us from all the risks we face.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein and Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
More than 50 U.S. companies are not waiting for White House action on global warming. They are following Europe's lead, and are cutting emissions, an issue that President Bush will hear a lot about when he meets with European leaders today. A growing number of American companies - including DuPont Co., of Wilmington, Del.; General Motors Corp., International Business Machines Corp. and Eastman Kodak Co. - are pledging to cut or limit their emissions of greenhouse gases, which most scientists say cause global warming.
NEWS
March 20, 2006
THE MOST immediate danger to our global environment is our weakened perception of threat. Many people like to simply deny that a problem exists. These people hate to think about the future. Why should they? Kurt Vonnegut calls these people "PP's (psychopathic personalities) a medical term for smart, personable people who have no consciences. " Our senator from Pennsylvania, Rick Santorum, is such a person. In 2005, he voted against requiring power plants to cut their greenhouse gas emissions and electric utilities to generate 10 percent of electricity from renewable sources.
NEWS
June 16, 2005
RE SENS. McCain and Lieberman promoting nuclear power in the global-warming amendment they plan to add to the Senate energy plan: Although the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is an important goal, giving more than $5 billion in government subsidies to nuclear power is not the best way to solve this problem. Nuclear technology is expensive, and nuclear waste remains lethal for generations. Re-introducing this long-abandoned option will not be the most efficient way to combat global warming.
NEWS
April 22, 2002 | By Robert C. Shinn
As we celebrate the 32d Earth Day, we have entered a new era that requires state governments to look beyond their borders to see how they can work with others. While I was commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, we signed an international declaration, sponsored by the United Nations Environment Program, committing our agency to join with other states and nations to seek reductions in emissions to increase environmental and economic sustainability.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | By James Gustave Speth
In the midst of global economic turmoil, scientific projections about the consequences of a warmer planet may seem more remote to countries negotiating a climate change treaty this week in Buenos Aires. Fears that warming temperatures could raise sea levels, alter rainfall patterns, and wreak havoc on food production systems could temporarily take a back seat to the social and economic concerns posed by the global financial crisis. But economic turmoil will eventually settle down, as it has in the past.
NEWS
April 4, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court's groundbreaking decision that regulation of so-called greenhouse gases appears to fall under the Clean Air Act is expected to have far-reaching consequences. But for New Jersey and Pennsylvania, experts said yesterday, the biggest impact of Monday's ruling is likely to be what they won't experience - legal challenges to their programs to mandate cleaner-burning cars. Both states have enacted rules based on California legislation that regulates carbon-dioxide emissions from passenger cars and light trucks.
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