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NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Arthur Max and Karl Ritter, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The hard-won deal at a U.N. global climate conference in South Africa keeps talks alive but doesn't address the core problem: The world's biggest carbon polluters aren't willing to cut emissions of greenhouse gases enough to stave off dangerous levels of global warming. With many scientists saying time is running out, a bigger part of the solution may have to come from the rise of climate-friendly technologies being developed outside the U.N. process. Scientists say that if levels of greenhouse gases continue to rise, eventually the world's climate will reach a tipping point, with melting of some ice sheets and a catastrophic rise of several feet in sea levels.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
The heat on meat consumption keeps rising. For decades, environmentalists have insisted that vegetables and other plant foods are the way to go. The latest lob comes from the Environmental Working Group, which adds new number-crunching to the debate. The national nonprofit commissioned a life-cycle analysis of 20 common foods - meat, fish, dairy, and vegetables. In a report released last week, "Meat Eater's Guide to Climate Change and Health," the group ranked them according to the amount of greenhouse gas emissions per kilogram - roughly four ounces - of the food.
NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Josh Lederman, Associated Press
TRENTON - Democratic lawmakers introduced legislation Monday to force Gov. Christie to stay in a multistate pact to reduce greenhouse gases blamed for global warming. The effort to thwart the governor's planned pullout from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) comes amid protests that New Jersey is forfeiting its status as a national leader in green economy and a debate over what impact the state's two years of participation has really had. Christie announced last month that he would pull the state from the initiative by year's end. A three-bill package introduced Monday would foil that by making participation in the initiative a state law and framing deviation from it as inconsistent with the Legislature's expressed intent to support initiatives that combat global warming.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Maya Rao, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie said today New Jersey will withdraw from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a cap-and-trade agreement between 10 northeast states, by the end of the year. The governor acknowledged that humans play a role in global warming but said the program does not address the problem. "This program is not effective in reducing greenhouse gases and is unlikely to be in the future," said the governor, standing alongside Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin at a statehouse news conference.
NEWS
April 21, 2009
Change your diet and help the world Tomorrow's Earth Day observance should encourage every one of us to leave adequate natural resources for our children and grandchildren by making needed changes, including in our diet. A 2006 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization blamed meat production for 18 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. That's more than automobiles! Carbon dioxide, the chief greenhouse gas, is emitted by burning forests to create animal pastures and by combustion of fossil fuels to operate farm machinery, trucks, refrigeration equipment, factory farms, and slaughterhouses.
FOOD
February 12, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It was Saturday, preview night for Union Trust, the latest front in the city's untimely steak wars, and the shots of Sobieski vodka were suitably chilled after sluicing through onion-domed ice sculptures that recalled - given the moment - the gilded end days of czarist Russia. Outside at Seventh and Chestnut were the requisite lines of invitees, the up-sweep of floodlights, cadres of hop-to-it valets. Inside, vaulted ceilings, once a signature of Jack Kellmer's jewelers, soared like a cathedral's, a breathtaking 47 feet.
NEWS
January 29, 2009
President Obama's executive order on greenhouse gas emissions is a refreshing first step toward reversing the government's harmful inaction on climate change. With a stroke of his pen, Obama repudiated eight years of the Bush administration's head-in-the-sand approach to global warming. The president directed Environmental Protection Agency chief Lisa Jackson to consider California's request to establish its own limits for emissions from cars and trucks, action that Bush resisted.
NEWS
July 13, 2008 | By Steve Young
Seeking to play down the effects of global warming, in October 2007 Vice President Dick Cheney's office pushed to delete from congressional testimony references about the consequences of climate change on public health, a former senior EPA official claimed Tuesday. . . . From the Desk of The Vice President of the United States Date: October, 2007 To: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention From: Darth Subject: Public health consequences of climate change hoax I've been going over the 14 - make that 13 pages (note to self: Don't sit so close to shredder)
NEWS
July 10, 2008
The G-8 summit concluded yesterday in Japan, with headlines about a climate-change agreement - and that President Bush had signed it. A big shift for Bush, said the headlines. A first. Yes and no. It is notable that the president signed the accord, in which the eight nations agreed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent by the year 2050. It was the first time Bush ever signed anything agreeing to a numerical goal. He refused at last year's G-8. As president, Bush has opposed U.S. agreement to the Kyoto Protocols, has expressed doubts about climate science, and has regularly called reduction targets unrealistic.
NEWS
May 26, 2008 | By Pat Rakowski
As much as most of us would like to help the environment, it's not always as simple as it might sound. More than 20 years ago, I moved to Philadelphia to be close to where I worked. I was feeling pretty green until 2001, when I started working in New Jersey. Getting to the new job by public transportation would have involved taking three buses and spending three hours of my time. Getting home would have required three more buses and another three hours. That's when I discovered I wasn't a green-at-any-cost kind of person.
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