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Greenhouse

BUSINESS
May 18, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Spring House start-up that is developing nonantibiotic therapies for gastrointestinal diseases has received a $500,000 investment from BioAdvance, the Philadelphia region's life-sciences "greenhouse. " Midway Pharmaceuticals is a biopharmaceutical firm focusing on drugs for GI diseases, including Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, and irritable-bowel syndrome. Midway's experimental compound, the polymer MDY-1001, inhibits bacteria in the GI tract and potentially could create nonantibiotic, nonimmunosuppressive therapies to treat a variety of GI disorders.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The truth is, the Greenhouse was going nowhere fast as a Philadelphia band. A record contract was out of the question. These guys couldn't even get steady work playing club dates around town. Even the city water department knew that the Greenhouse wasn't happenin'. "WATER SHUT OFF!" There was no mistaking the handwritten note scrawled across the calendar in the dining room of the band's rowhouse-studio in the Logan section. The Greenhouse needed a break. Something big. Something soon.
FOOD
April 19, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Lightfoot, marathon runner and local food zealot, is determined to change the way highly perishable, expensive-to-ship produce is grown and distributed to supermarkets in the Northeast and other parts of the nation. Starting in Yardley. As CEO of BrightFarms Inc., a big-picture company with a hyper-local focus, Lightfoot wants to "create beautiful local produce, near grocery retailers, that's thousands of miles fresher, and do it with the same food safety and year-round commercial volume as a large, centralized supplier might have been doing from a huge facility in California.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Charlie Frush, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The fixation began innocently enough. "I went to a garden mart to get Easter flowers," said Nancy Volpe of Tabernacle. The salesperson gave her a plant and said, "Why don't you take this and try to grow it? It's not growing here. " It was a simple gesture, but when she took the plant home and pampered it and it flourished, the Volpe household changed forever. So did the Volpe house. Where once it was just a home, now it includes a greenhouse addition and two extensions under glass, all to grow what has come to obsess the Volpes: Orchids.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dane Fleming of Malvern wanted to know what the dirty glass room with the whitewashed windows was for at Great Valley High School. Last year, as far as anyone could tell, it was a place for teachers to put their classroom plants during vacation breaks. To Fleming, now 17, that didn't seem like good management of the space. So he asked science teacher Robert McCarter if, after 18 years of relative neglect, there was not some better use for the 15-by-30-foot greenhouse. Indeed there was. Fleming, a junior this year, has prompted school officials to let him turn the greenhouse into a "natural habitat" - a virtual zoo that he and McCarter hope will sustain a collection of birds, mammals, reptiles, fish and plants for the educational enrichment of the district's students.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | by Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
This brutal winter found every breach in the windows and frames of the old greenhouse and overpowered the heaters, wiping out the brimming indoor garden. The budding greenhouse horticulturists - Overbrook High School students - had nurtured the cabbage and herbs and mustard greens and sunflowers since September. But January felled the flora. "It was a stressful time," said Sidney Bryant, a sophomore at the school, at 59th Street and Lancaster Avenue. Cora Turpin, biologist and head of Overbrook's science department, noted their disappointment.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | By William J. Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
In this, his 67th year, Barrington greenhouse operator John Hocking has found both deep sorrow and his greatest joy. His sorrow comes from the impending sale of the home in which he was born, and the demise of the successful greenhouse business at which he has worked for a half-century. Over the decades, as a bachelor living alone, Hocking cherished what he calls his "spiritual relationship" with hundreds of customers who visited his greenhouse to admire nature's blossoms.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / BONNIE WELLER
To show the beauty that can flourish in the most severe conditions, Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square has created the Silver Garden. Silver, gray and white foliage, native to Mediterranean and desert climates, is displayed in a setting of boulders and slate. The renovated greenhouse is equipped with heating and air-circulation systems duplicating the plants' habitats. The Silver Garden is open during regular conservatory hours, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
NEWS
April 26, 2006 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How's this for a farming technique of the future: workers harvesting red, ripe tomatoes without ever setting foot in a field. They wait for the crop to come to them, assembly-line style, from energy-efficient, computer-controlled greenhouses. This unusual patented system is being perfected at the Rutgers EcoComplex in Mansfield Township, Burlington County, where scientists hope to provide a source of economical fresh produce year-round. In the home of the world-famous Jersey tomato, hydroponically grown tomatoes are being pampered in a greenhouse powered by methane gas from a nearby landfill.
LIVING
June 13, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1997, Diane Newbury and her husband, Steven Berman, bought a large 19th-century house in Chestnut Hill that needed overhauling from top to bottom. So did the two acres surrounding it. Imagine overgrown trees, poison ivy and patchy lawn. Superimpose a gummy pool and enough paved surfaces to park a truck fleet, a greenhouse covered with wood paneling, and a broken fountain filled with dirt. "A bit of a wasteland," says Berman. But Newbury was undaunted. In fact, she says, when she first laid eyes on this rather forlorn L-shaped property on the Montgomery County line, "I had tingles all over my body.
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