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Greenhouse

NEWS
June 21, 1986 | By Monica Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County horticulturist Susan Goldsworthy marveled at the efficiency of the makeshift greenhouse at the Jardin de la Comunidad on Berks Street in Kensington. The small greenhouse, constructed of wooden posts draped in thick plastic, enables gardeners to grow vegetables year-round. The greenhouse, Goldsworthy said, is a beautiful piece of architecture, in contrast to the graffiti-stained wall against which it is built. Goldsworthy came across the greenhouse as she and about 80 other people were visiting 10 Philadelphia community gardens yesterday, on the ninth, and possibly final, Urban Gardening Tour.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
You hear a lot these days about how mindless government policy stifles innovation in the private sector. But in West Virginia's coal country, the opposite has happened. The lack of government rules has prompted a private company to stop work on a promising antipollution technology, which sets a dangerous precedent that utilities across the nation may follow. American Electric Power has dropped its effort to capture carbon dioxide from a huge coal-fired power plant, even though a pilot project was successful.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The central ingredients of a 1995 New Jersey fresh salad have, in this third week in January, already been combined on Allan Bylone's farm. Those ingredients would be: Earth. Water. Fire. Plastic. Lots of plastic. Two sheets of the stuff are stretched loosely over a 100-foot-long series of metal hoops to form each of two greenhouses. Other sheets are spread over the entire earthen floor of the greenhouse to keep out weeds. There's a 100-foot-long tube of plastic, used as a duct to carry hot air the length of the greenhouse.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some of them see their children every day because they live with them. Others see them on occasion because they don't. Some of them have resolved their emotional conflicts concerning jealousy, guilt, responsibility and death. Others have not. But whatever the circumstances, many single fathers celebrate Father's Day today as would any other father. Some are doted upon; others are remembered with a telephone call. For many of them, divorce, separation or the death of a spouse has not necessarily meant a break in relations with the children.
LIVING
February 8, 1987 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Their greenhouse is crammed with orchids - some on benches, others cascading down from a metal frame and still more under light units in the rear of the structure. At a guess, Stephen Bowen and Margo Brinton have 700 plants in their collection, which is, according to Bowen, average for a "normal orchid fanatic. " When I first met this couple, they were growing orchids in a high-rise greenhouse near the University of Pennsylvania campus. When Bowen was transferred to the federal Centers for Disease Control office in Harrisburg, they moved farther west, purchased a house in Malvern and added a greenhouse to accommodate the orchids.
NEWS
September 11, 2011
Museumgoers this fall will be able to piece together crime-scene evidence via mass spectrometry, ponder bloodsucking creatures of the imagination, and consider the imperfect mosaic of nationhood as a parade of diverse and unusual exhibitions and programs marches through the region's specialized museums. Offerings include the start of a yearlong project seeking to "imagine Africa," a show of works exploring the African American imagination, an outdoor exhibition focusing on worldwide malnutrition, and a portable greenhouse of the future, complete with room for future fossils - a kind of museum-to-be.
LIVING
December 13, 1996 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
If the gardeners in your neighborhood have been looking downcast lately, try to be understanding. These folks are into gardening because they love to propagate and sustain life. To be surrounded by so much death as winter approaches is a tough row to hoe, so to speak. Compounding the problem is that nurseries and garden centers just about give up on day-to-day horticulture in mid-October. Cell-packs of flowers and vegetables ready for the ground are replaced by Christmas wreaths, craft items, tulip bulbs, and bunches of colorful, though dead, cornstalks.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | By Jane Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
Cyclamen are plants for which the saying "small is more beautiful" is appropriate. The large florist cyclamen has a certain blowzy beauty. The smaller but still tender varieties more readily available in the last few years are even better because their flowers are more delicate, they are sometimes scented and their leaves are often mottled. Even smaller are species that will flower in cool greenhouses and outside in the area. You'll find them a challenge because, like other cyclamen, they're native to central and southern Europe and grow in areas where the weather is hot and very dry in the summer - conditions hard to duplicate around here.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
In a cozy corner of a quaint inn, Judith Elder is in a tizzy of anticipation, plumping pillows and planting daffodils for the benefit of tourists hoping to find a friend in Pennsylvania this summer. Planting daffodils, at this time of year? "Any reasonably well-informed person that knows anything at all about daffodils and horticulture ought to know that daffodils are planted in the fall," lectured City Councilman John Street, as he held before Council yesterday a state Department of Commerce ad containing a photo feature of Elder's preparations for the tourist season.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Thompson, who was raised in Audubon, N.J., grows hothouse tomatoes and lettuce in Camden, Maine, where the winter temperatures drop to minus 30 degrees Fahrenheit and the wind-chill factor creates a hospitable environment for polar bears. Yesterday, Thompson returned to New Jersey, and he got a cordial - perhaps even warm - reception from the Burlington County freeholders when he said he would like to help them grow tomatoes at the county landfill. Farmer Thompson, in a blue banker's suit, a paisley tie and a striped button-down shirt, said he could foresee a range of relationships, any one of which he would be happy to form with the freeholders: from helping them start their own hothouse to operating the business for the county.
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