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NEWS
May 21, 2010
Clearing the air about greenhouse gases will be the focus of a public meeting on Thursday, the Chester County commissioners said in a news release. The meeting will include a presentation from the Chester County Greenhouse Gas Reduction Task Force. The 64-member group was formed in December 2007 to address climate change and recommend ways the county, municipalities, the private sector and individuals can continue to reduce greenhouse emissions, the release said. The meeting will be held in Courtroom One of the historic Courthouse, Market and High streets, West Chester, beginning at 6:30 p.m.    Kathleen Brady Shea
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to public understanding of climate change - the forecast is hazy with a 90 percent chance of confusion. Is it a threat to life as we know it? Is it a hoax perpetrated by some bicycle-riding, SUV-hating, tofu-eating eggheads? In Copenhagen, President Obama is scheduled to speak on Friday as world leaders continue to work out strategies to curb the world's ever-increasing carbon emissions. Meanwhile, critics are still pointing to a cache of leaked e-mails that hackers stole from climate scientists.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to public understanding of climate change - the forecast is hazy with a 90 percent chance of confusion. Is it a threat to life as we know it? Is it a hoax perpetrated by some bicycle-riding, SUV-hating, tofu-eating eggheads? In Copenhagen, President Obama is scheduled to speak on Friday as world leaders continue to work out strategies to curb the world's ever-increasing carbon emissions. Meanwhile, critics are still pointing to a cache of leaked e-mails that hackers stole from climate scientists.
NEWS
April 18, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers and John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In a landmark move that countered eight years of inaction by the Bush administration, the Environmental Protection Agency determined yesterday that greenhouse gases threaten public health and welfare because they contribute to climate change. The ruling set the stage for the agency to regulate emissions from a spectrum of sources, including automobiles, ships, airplanes, power plants, oil refineries, steel mills, and more. Supporters and critics agreed that the finding was a game-changer with potentially profound consequences, though opponents warned that implementing new rules would have devastating impact on the economy.
NEWS
January 29, 2009
President Obama's executive order on greenhouse gas emissions is a refreshing first step toward reversing the government's harmful inaction on climate change. With a stroke of his pen, Obama repudiated eight years of the Bush administration's head-in-the-sand approach to global warming. The president directed Environmental Protection Agency chief Lisa Jackson to consider California's request to establish its own limits for emissions from cars and trucks, action that Bush resisted.
NEWS
July 13, 2008 | By Steve Young
Seeking to play down the effects of global warming, in October 2007 Vice President Dick Cheney's office pushed to delete from congressional testimony references about the consequences of climate change on public health, a former senior EPA official claimed Tuesday. . . . From the Desk of The Vice President of the United States Date: October, 2007 To: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention From: Darth Subject: Public health consequences of climate change hoax I've been going over the 14 - make that 13 pages (note to self: Don't sit so close to shredder)
LIVING
June 13, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1997, Diane Newbury and her husband, Steven Berman, bought a large 19th-century house in Chestnut Hill that needed overhauling from top to bottom. So did the two acres surrounding it. Imagine overgrown trees, poison ivy and patchy lawn. Superimpose a gummy pool and enough paved surfaces to park a truck fleet, a greenhouse covered with wood paneling, and a broken fountain filled with dirt. "A bit of a wasteland," says Berman. But Newbury was undaunted. In fact, she says, when she first laid eyes on this rather forlorn L-shaped property on the Montgomery County line, "I had tingles all over my body.
NEWS
January 9, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda M. Ciccantelli, 56, director of the horticulture therapy program at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, who for 32 years helped heal broken bodies and spirits by encouraging patients to nurture plants while learning to care for themselves, died Dec. 19 of coronary artery disease at her Chestnut Hill home. "Linda devoted her life to her horticulture program and patients," said Ron Siggs, a Magee spokesman. "She had a magical quality about her, and helped thousands of head and spinal-cord injury victims find a reason to live again through her therapy program.
NEWS
December 23, 2007 | By Bill Raftery INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County is going green. The county last week announced the formation of a 64-member Green House Gas Reduction Task Force that will recommend to the county commissioners ways to deal with climate change and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The panel is patterned after a similar effort in Montgomery County, said Steve Fromnick, director of facilities management for Chester County, who heads the project here. Like their Montgomery County counterparts, Fromnick said his group can't force anyone to do anything and will leave any issues that involve money or taxes to elected officials, the commissioners.
NEWS
December 6, 2007 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As part of the world's carbon footprint, Montgomery County doesn't even constitute as much as a toe. But the county wants to make an even smaller impression. So today, its commissioners are expected to take a rare step and adopt a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a variety of ways. No other county in Pennsylvania or South Jersey has done so. "It's really groundbreaking . . . and is a real model for what other counties or regional bodies can do," said Brian Hill, president of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council, a statewide nonprofit advocacy group.
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