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NEWS
March 28, 2005 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Climate historians call 1816 the "year without a summer. " Loyal readers might well be wondering if this is going to be a year without a spring. "Even the meteorologists all have this sallow look," said Wayne Higgins, principal scientist at the Climate Prediction Center, outside Washington. "They're asking, 'When is spring going to arrive?' " In Philadelphia, this almost certainly will be the coolest March in more than 20 years. Through Wednesday, below-normal temperatures were posted on every day but one, March 7, when the thermometer soared to 69. Nature celebrated by snowing on us the very next day. Incredibly, the first 16 days of March were 7.2 degrees colder than the first 16 days of January and 4.5 lower than the comparable February period.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Fueled by global warming, polar ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are melting three times faster than they did in the 1990s, a study says. So far, that's added about half an inch to rising sea levels, not as bad as some earlier worst-case scenarios. But the melting's quicker pace, especially in Greenland, has ice scientists worried. One of the biggest wild cards in climate change has been figuring out how much the melting of the massive sheets of ice at the two poles would add to the seas.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Bill Bozzone has filled all sorts of comedic writing assignments, including the script for the 1988 feature film, "Full Moon in Blue Water," starring Gene Hackman and Teri Garr. But his true metier is the one-act play, of which several have been produced by New York's Ensemble Studio Theatre and Manhattan Punch Line and the Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays. "The Inuit," which opened last night at the Harold Prince Theatre of the Annenberg Center, is Bozzone's first full-length play written expressly for the Festival Theatre; yet, despite its respectable 100-minute length, it has the feel of a one-act comedy trying desperately to find an escape hatch.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Nearly all of Greenland's massive ice sheet suddenly started melting a bit this month, a freak event that surprised scientists. Even Greenland's coldest and highest place, Summit station, showed melting. Ice-core records show that last happened in 1889 and occurs about once every 150 years. Three satellites show what NASA calls unprecedented melting of the ice sheet that blankets the island, starting July 8 and lasting four days. Most of the thick ice remains. While some ice usually melts during the summer, what was unusual was that the melting happened in a flash and across a widespread area.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
There's gold in them thar hills! And rubies, sapphires, platinum, and silver. Who could resist that siren call? Not Philly guy Americo DiSantis. "It was a chance to change my family's life," says the 31-year-old father of two, who works for AmeriDrill in Levittown. "How could you not do that?" Actually, a few reasons spring to mind. First of all, them thar weren't hills. They were rugged, forbidding mountains. In Greenland. With one of the most inhospitable and treacherous climates on the planet.
NEWS
March 10, 1997 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He was a Pew Fellowship finalist, and his work has been praised by writers from the Village Voice and Keyboard magazine. But John Greenland describes his best-known work as: "You know, the heroine walking down the street, being pursued by the monster. " The short piece, "Rites," has been used as background music on dozens of television shows. Greenland can't recall exactly which - he doesn't watch much TV. "That's where the monster appears," he says, narrating a playback of the piece with an amused expression.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Mike Leary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like the dragon ships of Eric the Red and Leif Ericson a millennium ago, the icebergs sailed the still and shimmering fiord, the jagged, frozen peaks not merely white and glittering, but blue - lapis lazuli, cerulean, royal, aquamarine. Periodically, there was a loud boom, startling when first heard, as one of the ridges on a melting berg noisily collapsed. Watching from a meadow ablaze with clumps of blue harebells and pink and purple dwarf fireweed, it was easy to imagine the legendary Norse explorers surveying the same scene.
NEWS
August 21, 2011 | By Charles J. Hanley, Associated Press
DISKO ISLAND, Greenland - The old hunter was troubled by the foreigners encroaching on his Inuit people's frozen lands. "The Inuit say that they are going to heat the siku [the sea ice] to make it melt. There will be almost no more winter," the elder said of the southerners in Jean Malaurie's The Last Kings of Thule, the French explorer's classic account of a year in the Arctic. That was 1951. Years later, another Inuit hunter looked out at Disko Bay from this island's rocky fringe and remembered driving his dogsled team over the solid glitter of the siku all the way to Ilulissat, a town 55 miles across the water.
LIVING
August 21, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The seafaring people known as Vikings left a great legacy of adventure: pillaging and looting their way through Europe, beating Columbus to North America, and settling the wilderness islands of Iceland and Greenland 1,000 years ago. They also left the historical record with a long-standing mystery: How - and why - did they suddenly vanish from Greenland after seeming to thrive there for more than three centuries? The Vikings were originally from Norway, and traces of their lineage can be found throughout Europe as well as Iceland.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
A foot dangling from a North Wildwood roller coaster became the unlikely weapon of death for a maintenance worker yesterday. The 36-year-old man, whom police would not identify, was killed when the foot of a rider on the "Great Noreaster" on Morey's Pier at 25th Street and the Boardwalk struck him in the head as he was picking up trash at 1:24 p.m. The worker was in a fenced-in area where the ride comes close to the ground. He was not supposed to be in there, said Detective Lt. George Greenland of the North Wildwood police.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE ONLY way to enjoy "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" is to ignore its frayed connection to the famous short story, and to take this reworked material on its own. Even then, it's a strange ride, the story of a day-dreaming loner (Ben Stiller) who learns to leave his comfort zone - an intimate story that director Stiller chooses to tell on a gigantic scale. Shut-in Walter (Stiller) works in the photo morgue of a dying magazine, and he's put in charge of the precious photo negative that will provide the cover image of the final print issue.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
Bolivia expels U.S. aid agency LA PAZ, Bolivia - President Evo Morales acted on a longtime threat Wednesday and expelled the U.S. Agency for International Development for allegedly seeking to undermine Bolivia's leftist government, and he harangued Washington's top diplomat for calling the Western Hemisphere his country's "backyard. " Bolivia's ABI state news agency said USAID was "accused of alleged political interference in peasant unions and other social organizations. " In the past, Morales has accused the agency of funding groups that opposed his policies, including a lowlands indigenous federation that organized protests against a Morales-backed highway through a rain-forest preserve.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
There's gold in them thar hills! And rubies, sapphires, platinum, and silver. Who could resist that siren call? Not Philly guy Americo DiSantis. "It was a chance to change my family's life," says the 31-year-old father of two, who works for AmeriDrill in Levittown. "How could you not do that?" Actually, a few reasons spring to mind. First of all, them thar weren't hills. They were rugged, forbidding mountains. In Greenland. With one of the most inhospitable and treacherous climates on the planet.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Fueled by global warming, polar ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are melting three times faster than they did in the 1990s, a study says. So far, that's added about half an inch to rising sea levels, not as bad as some earlier worst-case scenarios. But the melting's quicker pace, especially in Greenland, has ice scientists worried. One of the biggest wild cards in climate change has been figuring out how much the melting of the massive sheets of ice at the two poles would add to the seas.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | WASHINGTON POST
THE GIANT polar ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are losing three times as much ice as 20 years ago, adding to the rising sea level that threatens low-lying coastal areas, according to a new study hailed by scientists as the most accurate assessment of polar ice melt to date. In one startling finding, Greenland's melt was five times higher than it was in the mid-1990s, representing more than two-thirds of the ice loss, according to the study, published online Thursday in the journal Science . Antarctica's slower thaw accounted for the rest.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Nearly all of Greenland's massive ice sheet suddenly started melting a bit this month, a freak event that surprised scientists. Even Greenland's coldest and highest place, Summit station, showed melting. Ice-core records show that last happened in 1889 and occurs about once every 150 years. Three satellites show what NASA calls unprecedented melting of the ice sheet that blankets the island, starting July 8 and lasting four days. Most of the thick ice remains. While some ice usually melts during the summer, what was unusual was that the melting happened in a flash and across a widespread area.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lonnie Thompson routinely scales the world's highest peaks, in the Himalayas, the Andes and beyond, notwithstanding his chronic asthma and 63 years of age. His wife, Ellen Mosley-Thompson, treks through the forbidding expanses of Greenland and Antarctica. But the real exploration comes only after they get back to the laboratory at Ohio State University. The two researchers bring back long cylinders of ice they've extracted from these remote locales, analyzing them to monitor the Earth's changing climate.
NEWS
August 21, 2011 | By Charles J. Hanley, Associated Press
DISKO ISLAND, Greenland - The old hunter was troubled by the foreigners encroaching on his Inuit people's frozen lands. "The Inuit say that they are going to heat the siku [the sea ice] to make it melt. There will be almost no more winter," the elder said of the southerners in Jean Malaurie's The Last Kings of Thule, the French explorer's classic account of a year in the Arctic. That was 1951. Years later, another Inuit hunter looked out at Disko Bay from this island's rocky fringe and remembered driving his dogsled team over the solid glitter of the siku all the way to Ilulissat, a town 55 miles across the water.
NEWS
June 5, 2011 | By Louise Nordstrom, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM - Police have arrested 14 Greenpeace activists who climbed aboard an oil rig off Greenland's coast to protest deepwater drilling in the Arctic. Four Greenpeace members were still onboard the Leiv Eiriksson oil rig, where they had locked themselves into two crane cabins, police and the environmental group said Saturday. The rig is operated by the Scottish oil group Cairn Energy, which has temporarily suspended its drilling due to the protest. Police spokesman Morten Nielsen said those arrested would be taken to Nuuk, the semiautonomous Danish territory's capital, and kept in detention.
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