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Greenway

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NEWS
August 2, 2000 | By Patricio G. Balona, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Pedaling a bicycle or strolling from one end of the township to the other should be safer with a two-mile greenway proposed for the western section of the township. "Besides saving open space, citizens will be able to go from one side of the town to the other without using a car," Parks and Recreation director Larry Brown said. "Citizens will be able to travel without getting onto major busy roadways like Germantown Pike. " Brown said construction was expected to start next spring for the greenway from Ballard-Wolffe Park at Woodland Avenue and Trooper Road to Paul Fly Elementary School at Potshop Road.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Montgomery County commissioners, all of whom are preparing to step down in January, have decided to forgo the traditional ride into the sunset in favor of a canoe trip down the Schuylkill. But the two-day excursion, scheduled for June 9 and 10, is not strictly for fun. Dubbed the "Voyage of Rediscovery," the trip is the first tentative step toward creation of a greenway along the 42-mile stretch of the river that winds through Montgomery County - a years-long process that Commissioner Jim Maza hopes will be the current county leaders' lasting legacy.
NEWS
August 7, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Borski heads down a long lane off State Road and stops his car at a city park on the Delaware River in Northeast Philadelphia. The former congressman scans the broad shoulders of the muddy river. "It's spectacular," Borski said. "And no one ever gets over here to see it. " That is set to change dramatically in the next two years. The long-discussed North Delaware riverfront greenway is moving closer to reality, with enough public support and public money - $34 million - to begin construction on two-thirds of the proposed 11-mile trail for runners, walkers and cyclists.
NEWS
November 9, 1999 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
More than 80 state and local politicians yesterday turned their attention to revitalizing a hidden hotbed of economic growth: the Schuylkill. "The splendor of the Schuylkill has been ignored by every Montgomery County community through which it flows," U.S. Rep. Joe Hoeffel (D., Pa.) said during yesterday's "Come to the River!" conference at the Montgomery County Fire Academy in Plymouth. The half-day event preceded three public-input sessions today through Thursday. The sessions, from 4:30 to 9:30 p.m., will be held today at Montgomery County Community College in Pottstown, tomorrow at the Upper Merion Township Building, and Thursday at Lee Park in Conshohocken.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The preservation of a scenic 137-acre property along the Route 3 corridor in Chester County will be celebrated today. The tract, known as the Okehocking Preserve, is between Garrett Mill and Delchester Roads. A former dairy farm, the preserve was originally part of William Penn's land grant to the Okehocking Indians who lived along Ridley Creek. Today's celebration is the culmination of a 15-year effort by the Willistown Conservation Trust, Willistown Township, Chester County, and the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources to save the property from development.
NEWS
December 17, 2011
Does it make sense to dramatically transform an often busy street like Spring Garden with a bike and pedestrian greenway?
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a bid to "link up the works of God and the works of man," as preservationist Dulcie Flaharty put it, federal, state and local officials gathered in West Conshohocken yesterday to resume discussion of the opportunities offered by the area's "hidden river," the Schuylkill. About 60 politicians and planners met with U.S. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt to hear Montgomery County's plans for recreational development along the long-neglected waterway. "We've looked at the Schuylkill in utilitarian terms," said Michael Stokes, assistant director of the county Planning Commission.
NEWS
October 6, 2009 | By Rachel Vassar
While it's not always readily apparent, Philadelphia was located here because of its rivers. The city streets were laid out as a grid linking one river, the Delaware, to the other, the Schuylkill. In the early days, the riverfronts served as common areas for public use and enjoyment. They also became gateways of commerce and industry, helping Philadelphia grow. But as manufacturing declined in the second half of the 20th century, large swaths of the rivers' banks fell into neglect, creating a physical and psychological barrier between citizens and the riverfronts.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Jack McGuire and Joe O'Dowd contributed to this report
It was a drug deal gone bad, with a twist: Two men were shot to death, but before dying, one of them got into a traffic accident, injuring a woman and three kids. It happened in Southwest Philadelphia about 9 a.m. yesterday. Cops believe it began with a drug deal on 61st Street near Reinhard Avenue. Two men were shot. One who died fell onto a pile of bills - about $800. The other got into a nearby Dodge Intrepid with a man and a woman, and fled. As the car was careening north on 61st, it slammed into Latonya Henry's car. A woman who lives on the corner of Greenway and 61st, where the crash occurred, said she heard a screech and a bang, and she ran to her window.
NEWS
October 6, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seeking clout in unity, the newly formed Coalition for Philadelphia's Riverfronts is an alliance of more than three dozen civic, neighborhood, governmental, faith-based, and business groups dedicated to revitalizing the city's waterfront areas through the creation of a comprehensive rivers' edge greenway. "Riverfront groups generally have advocated for a local portion or a section" of the rivers, said coalition coordinator Rachel Vassar. What distinguishes the coalition, she said, is that it brings together diverse constituencies, from South Philadelphia's Passyunk Square Civic Association to Port Richmond's Friends of Pulaski Park.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 2, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Government planners fanned out along Spring Garden Street on Thursday to consider replacing its median with a bicycle pathway. Armed with clipboards and checklists, the federal, state, and local planners were taking the first step toward creating an $8 million, 2.2-mile-long "Spring Garden Greenway" that would connect to paths along the Schuylkill and the Delaware River. Thursday's assessment "will really help to lift this project and give it momentum," said Patrick Starr, executive vice president of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council, which is seeking a $900,000 grant from the state to advance the project.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along both branches of Pennsylvania's Brandywine Creek - in 24 hilly communities west of Philadelphia - about 37,000 acres have been marked off-limits to development. Part is public parkland; most is owned by private landowners who have given up development rights in exchange for lower property taxes and other incentives. The acreage covers nearly a quarter of the land in those communities, an area four times the size of Philadelphia's park system, including Fairmount Park . Is it enough?
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
MANTUA Walking through trash-strewn lots and past dilapidated houses, Mayor Nutter and Federal Housing Administration Commissioner Carol Galante listened to officials and community leaders talk about the future transformation of Mantua. The tour was the first one for city and federal officials since President Obama designated Mantua a Promise Zone. "We will bring back Mantua," the mayor said. The one-hour jaunt, which started at 37th and Brown Streets and ended about an hour later at 35th Street and Fairmount Avenue, allowed the entourage to envision possibilities, such as a transit stop at Philadelphia Zoo, 34th Street and Mantua Avenue, and a 10-block greenway along Mantua, a street now littered with diapers and other trash.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pedestrian ramp for the Ben Franklin Bridge, a former rail bridge over the Schuylkill in Manayunk, and a Burlington County trail are among 13 trails getting $4 million for design and construction, local officials said Wednesday. The trails are part of a 750-mile network being built for pedestrians and bicyclists in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey. About 285 miles of trails in the network are built, and an additional 50 miles are in development, leaving about 415 miles to go. Trail advocates hope to complete the network within 20 years at a cost of $250 million.
TRAVEL
June 17, 2013 | By Gretchen Mckay, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
ROANOKE, Va. - Its heritage is tied to the railroad. Yet even before Norfolk & Western Railway's steam locomotives rolled into the heart of Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, this picturesque little town was a happening place. A hub along the long and bumpy Great Wagon Road that brought 18th-century settlers from Philadelphia to central North Carolina, Big Lick, as the town originally was known, bustled with three hotels, five tobacco factories, a cigar factory, and five churches. It also boasted a shoemaker, harness-maker, undertaker, four doctors, and two lawyers.
SPORTS
February 10, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
GARY GORDON'S first cousin, John Johnson, is a freshman basketball player at Pitt and Gary, natch, also hopes to enjoy a successful college career. So, early last November, when he suffered an injury to his right knee while playing in an independent league, the last thing he wanted to do was acknowledge it. "I made a pass to the wing, then went to set a pick so a guy could come up and shoot a jumper," Gordon said. "I felt something rip and fell right to the floor. My leg had a 90-degree angle.
NEWS
December 17, 2011
Does it make sense to dramatically transform an often busy street like Spring Garden with a bike and pedestrian greenway?
NEWS
December 17, 2011
Wouldn't it be fun to safely ride your bike or take a leisurely walk on a tree-studded path from the banks of the Delaware to the Schuylkill? The Pennsylvania Environmental Planning Council, a statewide organization with regional offices that work to revitalize communities, protect working farms, preserve critical wildlife habitat, and protect lakes, streams, and rivers, is working its way through an extensive process to come up with a plan,...
NEWS
October 6, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seeking clout in unity, the newly formed Coalition for Philadelphia's Riverfronts is an alliance of more than three dozen civic, neighborhood, governmental, faith-based, and business groups dedicated to revitalizing the city's waterfront areas through the creation of a comprehensive rivers' edge greenway. "Riverfront groups generally have advocated for a local portion or a section" of the rivers, said coalition coordinator Rachel Vassar. What distinguishes the coalition, she said, is that it brings together diverse constituencies, from South Philadelphia's Passyunk Square Civic Association to Port Richmond's Friends of Pulaski Park.
NEWS
October 6, 2009 | By Rachel Vassar
While it's not always readily apparent, Philadelphia was located here because of its rivers. The city streets were laid out as a grid linking one river, the Delaware, to the other, the Schuylkill. In the early days, the riverfronts served as common areas for public use and enjoyment. They also became gateways of commerce and industry, helping Philadelphia grow. But as manufacturing declined in the second half of the 20th century, large swaths of the rivers' banks fell into neglect, creating a physical and psychological barrier between citizens and the riverfronts.
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