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Greg Maddux

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SPORTS
October 21, 1995 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one corner, you have Mr. October. In the other corner, you have Mr. April-May-June-July-August-September. So those classic World Series pitching matchups don't roll off the assembly line any more perfectly than this: Orel Hershiser versus Greg Maddux. They will duel tonight in baseball's first World Series game in 728 days. And this sport couldn't script it any better. It gets a dream World Series in Indians versus Braves. It gets the ultimate pitcher's duel in Hershiser versus Maddux.
SPORTS
October 11, 1998 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Greg Maddux said he had lost this game on one pitch, and the Cy Young collector from Atlanta was right. He did lose Game 3 of the National League Championship Series yesterday on one pitch. Only thing is, he didn't lose it on the pitch he thinks he did. He didn't lose it on that fifth-inning fastball, the one Steve Finley turned into the gapper that fueled a two-out, two-run rally and propelled the rampaging San Diego Padres to a 4-1 victory over the Braves at deafening Qualcomm Stadium.
NEWS
August 18, 1997
There is no longer a need to tune in to Wall Street analysts for predictions (guesses?) as to which investment approach to take for the next boom. The next successful investment vehicle is "pitching," and it's part of a repeatedly ridiculous sport (business?) called baseball. The Atlanta Braves, predicting a bull market, invested heavily in Greg Maddux futures this month, guaranteeing the pitcher $57.5 million over five years. The genius of this decision is best described by some market indices and expected performance: Performance.
SPORTS
October 8, 1993 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Greg Maddux shot par. Seven innings pitched, two runs allowed, five hits, to lead his team back to a comfortable position. Except this time was different. Maddux had help, lots of it, almost as much help in this one game as he received in all 10 of his regular-season losses. That's right. Greg Maddux received 15 runs of support in his 10 losses this season. Last night, in winning his first-ever playoff game, he won by a 14-3 count. "As a pitcher, you really enjoy that," he said.
SPORTS
January 15, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The Chicago Cubs would like Greg Maddux to finish where he started. The Cubs offered Maddux a 2-year deal earlier this week, thought to be worth a total of $14 million to $15 million. Maddux made $14.75 million last year, his final season with Atlanta. Maddux hadn't given the Cubs an answer as of yesterday, and general manager Jim Hendry said he expects the righthander to take his time before deciding. Maddux is only 11 wins shy of his 300th victory. He spent his first seven seasons in Chicago, going 95-75 and winning the first of his four Cy Young Awards.
SPORTS
October 20, 2001 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Greg Maddux is going to start Game 4 of the National League Championship Series tonight on three days' rest. Doubters of the wisdom of that might feel different after examining Maddux's remarkable resume on reduced rest. Since 1987, his rookie season, Maddux has pitched on less than four days' rest 34 times in regular-season games. He is 18-5 for a .783 winning percentage with a 2.52 ERA in those games. Eight of them have been complete games, including three shutouts. With four days' rest or more, he has a .629 winning percentage and a 3.30 ERA. That, perhaps, is why Maddux thinks that it is not such a big deal that he will come back tonight against the Arizona Diamondbacks after having lost Game 1 on Wednesday at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix.
SPORTS
April 8, 2013
It has been 20 years since Daulton, Dykstra, Kruk, Hollins, Mitchy-Poo, and Schilling captivated the city with an improbable worst-to-first run that did not end until Toronto's Joe Carter launched a World Series-ending home run into the left-field seats at the SkyDome. Throughout this season, The Inquirer will profile one of the cast of characters from that unforgettable team. This week's profile: Jim Fregosi. Age: 71. Current job: In his 13th season as special assistant to the general manager with the Atlanta Braves.
SPORTS
October 5, 2002 | By Ray Glier FOR THE INQUIRER
Thirty minutes after they beat the San Francisco Giants on Thursday night to even their best-of-five division series at one game apiece, the Atlanta Braves were slipping into collared shirts, ties, and sport coats and boarding a flight to the West Coast for Game 3. The Braves looked perfectly comfortable and content in their business attire, in fact almost gleeful, even with a lengthy flight ahead of them. Why shouldn't the Braves feel comfortable and content? They've played two games in the 2002 postseason and Greg Maddux, their four-time Cy Young Award winner, hasn't thrown a pitch.
SPORTS
July 7, 1998 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What if they played a baseball All-Star Game, and an NBA All-Star Game score broke out? It could happen tonight, when baseball holds its first All-Star Game on the moon. Or, at least, the closest ballpark to it. That would be Denver's magnificent, highly altitudinous Coors Field - where the fly balls aren't just outs, they're journeys to the next galaxy. "Tell you what," Yankees pitcher David Wells said yesterday. "I think my son can go deep here. " For the record, Wells' son, Brandon, is 6. Also for the record, Brandon Wells' father - the man who made that statement - happens to be the American League's starting pitcher.
NEWS
May 21, 1998 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
Baseball, the next hot sport. Baseball? That surly dowager? The sport of Bud Selig and Albert Belle, of chronic strikes and greedy agents, of endless pauses and plummeting ratings? That pastoral pastime, so out of place in a high-tech, hip-hop world? Yep, that one. It was never as ailing as the premature obituaries claimed (though it did have a nasty cough and a touch of arthritis). Right now, it's looking surprisingly buff, just as America's other major sports show some telltale decay.
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SPORTS
April 8, 2013
It has been 20 years since Daulton, Dykstra, Kruk, Hollins, Mitchy-Poo, and Schilling captivated the city with an improbable worst-to-first run that did not end until Toronto's Joe Carter launched a World Series-ending home run into the left-field seats at the SkyDome. Throughout this season, The Inquirer will profile one of the cast of characters from that unforgettable team. This week's profile: Jim Fregosi. Age: 71. Current job: In his 13th season as special assistant to the general manager with the Atlanta Braves.
SPORTS
June 24, 2008 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies are well into their annual midseason quest to land a starting pitcher. C.C. Sabathia, Greg Maddux, Roy Oswalt and Erik Bedard are some of the names being tossed around. Any of them could help. Teams, however, just don't push a button and make a deal. No-trade clauses must be waived. Salaries must be fit into payroll structures. The hope of winning now must be weighed against the risk of mortgaging potential stars. First and foremost, though, a team seeking a commodity must have the wherewithal to acquire it. There lies the rub for the Phillies.
SPORTS
January 15, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The Chicago Cubs would like Greg Maddux to finish where he started. The Cubs offered Maddux a 2-year deal earlier this week, thought to be worth a total of $14 million to $15 million. Maddux made $14.75 million last year, his final season with Atlanta. Maddux hadn't given the Cubs an answer as of yesterday, and general manager Jim Hendry said he expects the righthander to take his time before deciding. Maddux is only 11 wins shy of his 300th victory. He spent his first seven seasons in Chicago, going 95-75 and winning the first of his four Cy Young Awards.
SPORTS
April 19, 2003 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So close that it put knots in the stomach of Randy Wolf afterward. So very close. "It's going to be hard to sleep tonight," Wolf said after the Phillies fell, 5-4, last night to the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field. Hard to sleep because the Phillies had a 4-1 lead in the top of the sixth inning and had knocked Braves pitcher Greg Maddux out of the game in the process. Hard to sleep because of the way they lost it. "Things just kind of snowballed," Wolf said. "It just got away.
SPORTS
November 4, 2002 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies' free-agent quest is getting more and more interesting. They will give first baseman Jim Thome a tour of their new ballpark site on Thursday, and they have zeroed in on Atlanta lefthander Tom Glavine as a top pitching priority. General manager Ed Wade said he talked to Glavine's agent several times last week, and he hoped to express the Phillies' high level of interest directly to the two-time Cy Young Award winner in a phone conversation today. Glavine, a free agent for the first time in his career, reportedly was offended when the Braves initially offered nothing more than a one-year deal worth $8 million plus four option years.
SPORTS
October 5, 2002 | By Ray Glier FOR THE INQUIRER
Thirty minutes after they beat the San Francisco Giants on Thursday night to even their best-of-five division series at one game apiece, the Atlanta Braves were slipping into collared shirts, ties, and sport coats and boarding a flight to the West Coast for Game 3. The Braves looked perfectly comfortable and content in their business attire, in fact almost gleeful, even with a lengthy flight ahead of them. Why shouldn't the Braves feel comfortable and content? They've played two games in the 2002 postseason and Greg Maddux, their four-time Cy Young Award winner, hasn't thrown a pitch.
SPORTS
October 20, 2001 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Greg Maddux is going to start Game 4 of the National League Championship Series tonight on three days' rest. Doubters of the wisdom of that might feel different after examining Maddux's remarkable resume on reduced rest. Since 1987, his rookie season, Maddux has pitched on less than four days' rest 34 times in regular-season games. He is 18-5 for a .783 winning percentage with a 2.52 ERA in those games. Eight of them have been complete games, including three shutouts. With four days' rest or more, he has a .629 winning percentage and a 3.30 ERA. That, perhaps, is why Maddux thinks that it is not such a big deal that he will come back tonight against the Arizona Diamondbacks after having lost Game 1 on Wednesday at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix.
SPORTS
October 11, 1998 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Greg Maddux said he had lost this game on one pitch, and the Cy Young collector from Atlanta was right. He did lose Game 3 of the National League Championship Series yesterday on one pitch. Only thing is, he didn't lose it on the pitch he thinks he did. He didn't lose it on that fifth-inning fastball, the one Steve Finley turned into the gapper that fueled a two-out, two-run rally and propelled the rampaging San Diego Padres to a 4-1 victory over the Braves at deafening Qualcomm Stadium.
SPORTS
July 7, 1998 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What if they played a baseball All-Star Game, and an NBA All-Star Game score broke out? It could happen tonight, when baseball holds its first All-Star Game on the moon. Or, at least, the closest ballpark to it. That would be Denver's magnificent, highly altitudinous Coors Field - where the fly balls aren't just outs, they're journeys to the next galaxy. "Tell you what," Yankees pitcher David Wells said yesterday. "I think my son can go deep here. " For the record, Wells' son, Brandon, is 6. Also for the record, Brandon Wells' father - the man who made that statement - happens to be the American League's starting pitcher.
NEWS
May 21, 1998 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
Baseball, the next hot sport. Baseball? That surly dowager? The sport of Bud Selig and Albert Belle, of chronic strikes and greedy agents, of endless pauses and plummeting ratings? That pastoral pastime, so out of place in a high-tech, hip-hop world? Yep, that one. It was never as ailing as the premature obituaries claimed (though it did have a nasty cough and a touch of arthritis). Right now, it's looking surprisingly buff, just as America's other major sports show some telltale decay.
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