CollectionsGreg Wood
IN THE NEWS

Greg Wood

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Lantern Theater's frothy French frolic, The School for Wives, is Moli?re on a small scale. One theme, a handful of characters, and a happy ending: Love triumphs over the best-laid plans and passionate youth trumps middle-aged wealth and scheming. We are warned in the opening scene, "We must dread the denouement," but no need, no need. The goofy, colorful set (Nick Embree) at St. Stephen's Theater, full of smirking cupids and cockeyed windows, establishes the playful tone of director Kathryn Nocero MacMillan's production.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the press material for Foundation Theater's production of Much Ado About Nothing, artistic director Julie Ellen Prusinowksi notes that the play is her favorite Shakespearean comedy. But Prusinowski's fondness for the tale of love and deception is not evident in the lifeless, rote, decidedly unhumorous reading she has directed. This version of the comedy will not make it a favorite with anyone who sees it. Prusinowski has moved the setting from 16th-century Sicily to America just after World War I. The postwar period's changing codes of behavior, she feels, lend themselves to the issues raised in the play.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1996 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Arden Theatre Company has brought the suburbs its production of William Finn's bittersweet Falsettos, which invigorated the 1995-96 theater season when it played the Arden's Old City home base in November and December. With three replacements for original cast members, the musical runs through Sunday on the main stage of the People's Light and Theatre Company in Malvern. The new players fit snugly into an already tight ensemble. As Trina, the wife whose husband, Marvin, takes up with a male lover (thus driving her into the arms of Marvin's psychiatrist, Mendel)
NEWS
July 22, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The only thing more outstanding than the ungainly nose on the title character in Cyrano de Bergerac is the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's impressive production itself. The festival's final offering this summer, Edmund Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac, is gorgeous in many ways: its melodic translation by Anthony Burgess, the one used on Broadway last season in a production with Kevin Kline and Jennifer Garner; an inspired portrait of a renegade with a broken heart of gold by Philadelphia actor Greg Wood; a staging by director Dennis Razze that embraces the play's most emotional scenes, then milks them for all they're worth.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
About halfway through the first act of Macbett, Eugene Ionesco's absurdist take on Macbeth, playing at the Bristol Riverside Theater, it occurred to me that I'd really rather be watching the original. Shakespeare wrote a better play. Within the framework of a much revised version of Macbeth, Ionesco's comedy is sporadically funny but, on the whole, it's a somewhat tedious satirical commentary on such topics as the mindless violence of war, ambitious politicians and soldiers and the corruptibility of power.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The Walnut Street Theatre's set for Jon Robin Baitz's Other Desert Cities , with its airy vaulted ceiling, floating staircase, and open hearth with an enormous hammered-copper hood, implies multimillion-dollar mountain views, and clubhouse access. Combined with midcentury modern furnishings - all wood, with pops of teal and mustard upholstery - set designer Todd Edward Ivins tells us all we need to know about this sunken living-room melodrama long before we realize it. The play, a Pulitzer finalist and Tony winner, is firmly rooted in the 20th-century stage tradition of dysfunctional families taking a long journey, drinking, and fighting well into night.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In 1882, a young Oscar Wilde took a one-day break from his lecture tour of North America to visit the Camden home of Walt Whitman. Thematically, Michael Whistler's Mickle Street, now at the Walnut Theatre's Independence Studio on 3, depicts this event as a gay apologia and examination of the difficulties one faced living as a homosexual in 1880s England and America (which Wilde would find out for himself a few decades later). Dramatically and in content, Mickle Street is so contrived that Whistler might just as well have invented their historic meeting.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Jim Rutter and FOR THE INQUIRER
Strong acting and bold direction too often overshadow the work that a design team contributes to a play's success. In the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's staging of The Tempest, the designers provide all the elements that make this production memorable. Not that the actors and director Jim Helsinger don't uphold the Festival's high standards. Greg Wood delivers a compelling, sympathetic performance as Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan exiled for 15 years on a remote island with his daughter Miranda (the earnest and endearing Kelsey Formost)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Sum of Us deals with the relationship between a father and his homosexual son, but don't sigh and assume that it is yet another work about a son's frustrating search for parental acceptance and a father's learning to come to terms with his child's sexuality. Far from it. In Australian David Stevens' play, which opens the Walnut Street Theatre's studio theater series, the father is so accepting and supportive of his son's sexual preference that he's a major nuisance to the younger man, becoming the oddly refracted image of a meddling mother determined to see her daughter happily married.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
David P. Gordon's unit set for The Grapes of Wrath, which opened on Tuesday at the Arden Theatre Company, is an astounding creation, a single swath of canvas that covers the stage floor, sweeps upward over the back wall, and projects forward over the playing area like a giant butterfly wing. As you study it before the play begins, its nature seems constantly in flux: At one moment it's an expansive cyclorama; at the next, an enfolding cocoon. As such, it's the perfect environment for Terrence J. Nolen's production of John Steinbeck's poignant story of the Joad family in the fall of 1938, adapted for the stage by Frank Galati.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In 1882, a young Oscar Wilde took a one-day break from his lecture tour of North America to visit the Camden home of Walt Whitman. Thematically, Michael Whistler's Mickle Street, now at the Walnut Theatre's Independence Studio on 3, depicts this event as a gay apologia and examination of the difficulties one faced living as a homosexual in 1880s England and America (which Wilde would find out for himself a few decades later). Dramatically and in content, Mickle Street is so contrived that Whistler might just as well have invented their historic meeting.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The Walnut Street Theatre's set for Jon Robin Baitz's Other Desert Cities , with its airy vaulted ceiling, floating staircase, and open hearth with an enormous hammered-copper hood, implies multimillion-dollar mountain views, and clubhouse access. Combined with midcentury modern furnishings - all wood, with pops of teal and mustard upholstery - set designer Todd Edward Ivins tells us all we need to know about this sunken living-room melodrama long before we realize it. The play, a Pulitzer finalist and Tony winner, is firmly rooted in the 20th-century stage tradition of dysfunctional families taking a long journey, drinking, and fighting well into night.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Jim Rutter and FOR THE INQUIRER
Strong acting and bold direction too often overshadow the work that a design team contributes to a play's success. In the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's staging of The Tempest, the designers provide all the elements that make this production memorable. Not that the actors and director Jim Helsinger don't uphold the Festival's high standards. Greg Wood delivers a compelling, sympathetic performance as Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan exiled for 15 years on a remote island with his daughter Miranda (the earnest and endearing Kelsey Formost)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Everyone, it seems, loves to watch A.R. Gurney's Sylvia , and everyone loves to produce it. Since 1995, the comedy about a boy and his dog, and his wife, and his midlife crisis as projected onto the dog, played by a cute young woman (Jessica Bedford) with shaggy blond curls, is a perennial on regional stages. This time, the lassie comes home to Ambler's Act II Playhouse, and why not? People love dogs, people love marriages weathering crisis, people love a happy ending. I do not love Sylvia , though I do anthropomorphize and love dogs, and all the rest of it. Lines such as Sylvia's wide-eyed declaration, "Even when you hit me, I love you" always struck me as a lose-lose proposition.
NEWS
July 22, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The only thing more outstanding than the ungainly nose on the title character in Cyrano de Bergerac is the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's impressive production itself. The festival's final offering this summer, Edmund Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac, is gorgeous in many ways: its melodic translation by Anthony Burgess, the one used on Broadway last season in a production with Kevin Kline and Jennifer Garner; an inspired portrait of a renegade with a broken heart of gold by Philadelphia actor Greg Wood; a staging by director Dennis Razze that embraces the play's most emotional scenes, then milks them for all they're worth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Lantern Theater's frothy French frolic, The School for Wives, is Moli?re on a small scale. One theme, a handful of characters, and a happy ending: Love triumphs over the best-laid plans and passionate youth trumps middle-aged wealth and scheming. We are warned in the opening scene, "We must dread the denouement," but no need, no need. The goofy, colorful set (Nick Embree) at St. Stephen's Theater, full of smirking cupids and cockeyed windows, establishes the playful tone of director Kathryn Nocero MacMillan's production.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In the tradition of J.D. Salinger and Thomas Pynchon, Editorial Decisions, the new play presented by Brick Playhouse, gives us Maxwell Kingfisher, a reclusive, highly regarded novelist about whom very little is known. Or does it really give us Maxwell Kingfisher? The ambiguity surrounding this character, who may or may not be the famous author, lies at the heart of this easy-to-take, amusing but ultimately unsatisfying comedy. In the end the audience learns almost nothing about him, but that's all right because Nicholas Wardigo's play isn't really about him and his carefully cultivated mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
David P. Gordon's unit set for The Grapes of Wrath, which opened on Tuesday at the Arden Theatre Company, is an astounding creation, a single swath of canvas that covers the stage floor, sweeps upward over the back wall, and projects forward over the playing area like a giant butterfly wing. As you study it before the play begins, its nature seems constantly in flux: At one moment it's an expansive cyclorama; at the next, an enfolding cocoon. As such, it's the perfect environment for Terrence J. Nolen's production of John Steinbeck's poignant story of the Joad family in the fall of 1938, adapted for the stage by Frank Galati.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1996 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Arden Theatre Company has brought the suburbs its production of William Finn's bittersweet Falsettos, which invigorated the 1995-96 theater season when it played the Arden's Old City home base in November and December. With three replacements for original cast members, the musical runs through Sunday on the main stage of the People's Light and Theatre Company in Malvern. The new players fit snugly into an already tight ensemble. As Trina, the wife whose husband, Marvin, takes up with a male lover (thus driving her into the arms of Marvin's psychiatrist, Mendel)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Among the pleasures of theatergoing in an area such as ours is watching gifted actors deepen their craft from season to season and role to role. None in Philadelphia has done so more consistently than Greg Wood, who has played everything from Shaw to Pinter in a career notable for a willingness to take risks - and for the excitement that often results when the risks pay off. Now Wood has taken the young actor's biggest risk of all, playing the title role in the production of Hamlet that debuted Friday as the 1995 season-opener of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|